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Photo's Of East Yorkshire Railways


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Reverting back to Springbank North and the signal bracket, I don't have a "Full Frontal" so this back view will have to do. The date is 18 March 1955, and the engine is A7 No 69973. The signal originates from 1885 and the opening of the railway, the H&B would have replaced the original arms c1910, and by 1955 only the two Distant arms of this pattern remain. The Main Line arm to Locomotive Jct was renewed as a NERly LQ in June 1939, the two UQ arms were fitted on Sunday 24 August 1952. The signal, and has altered remained in use until early 1957 when it was replaced by a "Modern" steel bracket.

attachicon.gifSPRINGBANK NORTH 69973 18 March 1955.jpg

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Sorry to come to this so late, but perhaps you mean 69773, or 69783?

 

Great pictures (especially D20 707) and thanks for the D20 number 62360.

 

Regards,

 

Roy Marshall

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37174 shunting in Melton Cement works 7/4/99, reopened to rail traffic the previous year taking calcium carbonate to Aberdeen this sadly didn't last long despite considerable track replacement and all the stored PDA tanks been scrapped on site, there were also 3 industrial shunters here as well one of which is still there.

 

Rob

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Thank you everyone for your contributions. I would like to ask, for I have not been able to find out, why the tracks were lowered under the Argyle Street bridge. I have not noticed the trains having any problems. Thanks in advance for any help about this.

 

With regards,

 

Rob.

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Nice one Mick,so other road driver's could be trusted to stop when the gates were across, but tram drivers couldn't!

In 1899 the fastest thing on the road was the electric tramcar, I don't know on who's insistence the tram signals were provided, possibly the BoT or the NERly, such signals were not unique to Hull, so possibly the former. The Tramway rule book stated any driver passing a signal at danger would face instant dismissal, trap points were also provided.

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 Hi, it is me again. The above question is a very interesting one, which, hopefully, Mick can answer.

 

Tonight I have a photo' of the front of the former station at Stamford Bridge. It shows the typical Andrews front, as applied to many other stations, i.e. Nafferton, Hutton Cranswick.

 

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With regards,

 

Rob.

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What happened if a tram set back over the trailing crossover to the right of the level crossing in the diagram?!

Steve, a good question, no doubt there was something in the signalbox "Special Authority's", but we must also remember in those far off days, common sense also prevailed.

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In 1899 the fastest thing on the road was the electric tramcar, I don't know on who's insistence the tram signals were provided, possibly the BoT or the NERly, such signals were not unique to Hull, so possibly the former. The Tramway rule book stated any driver passing a signal at danger would face instant dismissal, trap points were also provided.

There was what I assume was a tram signal in Sunderland which survived the end of the trams by 25 years finally disappearing in about 1980. It was a huge lamp case which looked like one of those headlamps favoured on American steam engines and had a big red lens with "STOP" in black. It annoys me that I didn't take photos of non railway things like that.

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Steve, a good question, no doubt there was something in the signalbox "Special Authority's", but we must also remember in those far off days, common sense also prevailed.

 

Thanks Mick, I expect it was a case of 'a clear understanding to be reached between all involved' and common sense would prevail (and I don't suppose it happened very often), just looked a bit odd as it circumvents the trap points!

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What happened if a tram set back over the trailing crossover to the right of the level crossing in the diagram?!

No reason at all why the signal would not apply to it as far as I can see.  The signals are clearly there to stop a tram approaching the railway unless the level crossing is set for them thus all the Signalman needed to now was that a tram would be reversing rather than arriving on the right line.  Whether or not it was in the 'box Instructions is another issue and it might have been but as already noted there seems to have been a lot more common sense about in those days.

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Rob, Previous track renewals had made the passage under Argyle St Bridge slightly out of gauge to steam locos on charters. In fact one hit it's chimney under the bridge hence no steam locos into Hull Paragon for the last few years. Hopefully this will now be resolved.

 

Paul

Thank you. I did not know that, hopefully it will be OK now. Useful information, I thought that the line closure was for track renewals, you see!

 

With regards,

 

Rob.

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In the picture of the 66 at West Parade Jctn what is the large grey building in the background please I have noticed in a dvd I have in other pictures and has mystified me?

It depends which of the photo's you are referring to. It is either the KC Stadium or The Hull Royal Infirmary.

 

Regards,

 

Rob.

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In August 1977 I caught a bus to Ganton and then made a long walk to the site of the station, past the famous golf course. The station had been razed and all that remained was the lovely signalbox.

Hearing my accent the signalman tried to engage me in conversation about football, a subject which I have absolutely no interest in !

 

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Years later the signalbox diagram turned up at the Malton railwayana auction.
 
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Hello, everyone. And thank you for your contributions, especially PinzaC55 for the photo' and signalling diagram of Ganton, which a few years ago I cycled through as part of a cycle tour to the North York Moors and back.

 

Tonight we are looking at the former signal box at Warthill on the one time railway to Market Weighton from York. The photo' was taken in mid-August of this year, and shows that the box is in a fairly good condition, complete with burglar alarm!

 

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With regards,

 

Rob.

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In 1978 I walked from somewhere (can't remember after all these years !) to Malton via Huttons Ambo. The station here was one of the prettiest I ever saw, in an idyllic setting; luckily the current owners have respected it somewhat.

This was not long after I bought my Praktica LTL-3 camera which gave great results compared to my dad's clunky old Zenith-E.

 

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At the time the former goods weighbridge existed though it has long since disappeared.
 
Edited by PinzaC55
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