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Jonny's "where are these?" photo album


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17 minutes ago, jonny777 said:

In the foreground appears to be a suburban DMU with a toilet in one of the vehicles (probably a trailer composite).

Mk1 suburban coaches is another possibility.

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Posted (edited)

Looks a bit like the north end of Aylesbury. (Edit: old-maps seems to confirm)

 

Signalling on the GW/GC Jt was a joint responsibility. So what there was by way of signals would depend on which year it was installed. Seems an odd way of working to me.

Edited by Joseph_Pestell
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The problem with Aylesbury as my reading of the maps are concerned, is that the north end should have a footbridge between the platforms. 

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This is an interesting photo. 

 

An exhibition with 71000 and a Hymek.  My question is why would BR go to the trouble of exhibiting a large steam locomotive which would be withdrawn in less than 12 months?

 

802631914_71000exhibition1962.jpg.e818ecddc89b3b0e528adad1d835c4d1.jpg

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32 minutes ago, jonny777 said:

The problem with Aylesbury as my reading of the maps are concerned, is that the north end should have a footbridge between the platforms. 

Looking at the map linked below, the track layout seems to match if the photographer is standing on the footbridge leading from "Friarage Path", just north of the platforms which have a separate footbridge.  

 

Aylesbury was purely Metropolitan with GC running powers I believe, so presumably the joint signaling arrangements didn't apply.  

 

https://maps.nls.uk/view/104182214

Edited by Edwin_m
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17 minutes ago, jonny777 said:

This is an interesting photo. 

 

An exhibition with 71000 and a Hymek.  My question is why would BR go to the trouble of exhibiting a large steam locomotive which would be withdrawn in less than 12 months?

 

802631914_71000exhibition1962.jpg.e818ecddc89b3b0e528adad1d835c4d1.jpg

Suspect this is the Marylebone parcels depot open day 11-14 May 1961, details at :

 

http://www.bropendays.co.uk/marylebone1961.html

 

At least the 'Duke' was still in service at the time unlike the two Bulleid 'West Country' Pacifics that were en-route for scrapping in South Wales but were diverted to star in the open day at Bristol Bath Road depot:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8469264292/in/pool-hampshire-railways

 

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3 minutes ago, SP Steve said:

Suspect this is the Marylebone parcels depot open day 11-14 May 1961, details at :

 

http://www.bropendays.co.uk/marylebone1961.html

 

At least the 'Duke' was still in service at the time unlike the two Bulleid 'West Country' Pacifics that were en-route for scrapping in South Wales but were diverted to star in the open day at Bristol Bath Road depot:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8469264292/in/pool-hampshire-railways

 

 

 

A slight exaggeration. 34013 and 34100 did not *star* at the Open Day. 

 

I think 46201, 7029 and 7808 were considered the stars of that day. 

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1 hour ago, Edwin_m said:

Looking at the map linked below, the track layout seems to match if the photographer is standing on the footbridge leading from "Friarage Path", just north of the platforms which have a separate footbridge.  

 

Aylesbury was purely Metropolitan with GC running powers I believe, so presumably the joint signaling arrangements didn't apply.  

 

https://maps.nls.uk/view/104182214

IIRC Aylesbury was originally a broad gauge GW station on the "Wycombe Railway"

 

Edit Opened 1863 by Wycombe Railway, 1867 GW, 1892/3 Met/GW joint

After the GC arrived the Met lines outside the  GW/Met joint station confines became Met/GC jt.

Edited by melmerby
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Edwin_m said:

Looking at the map linked below, the track layout seems to match if the photographer is standing on the footbridge leading from "Friarage Path", just north of the platforms which have a separate footbridge.  

 

Aylesbury was purely Metropolitan with GC running powers I believe, so presumably the joint signaling arrangements didn't apply.  

 

https://maps.nls.uk/view/104182214

 

The signal box by the goods shed fits too.

The signals on the either side of the overbridge are also visible.

 

The ground signals on the left look to be LNER and follow the practice of being side by side while the one on the right looks to be LMR.

 

Edited by beast66606
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13 hours ago, melmerby said:

IIRC Aylesbury was originally a broad gauge GW station on the "Wycombe Railway"

 

Edit Opened 1863 by Wycombe Railway, 1867 GW, 1892/3 Met/GW joint

After the GC arrived the Met lines outside the  GW/Met joint station confines became Met/GC jt.

Agree.  This RCH map shows the pwneship after the opening of the GCR London Extension -

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/46/Aylesbury%2C_High_Wycombe%2C_Princes_Risboro%2C_Quainton_Road_%26_Verney_Ashendon_RJD_146.jpg

 

The BR period 'ownership' was confusing to say the least as the southern end of the GCR was at various times under the control of three different Regions - the Eastern (briefly), then the Western (briefly the first time round), then the LMR for a long while, and finally back to the Western until sectorisation when it went to NSE.  In signalling terms there were very few signs of the first Western period of ownership about from one or two ground discs so visible signalling was basically LNER or LM Region.

 

The GW & GC Joint Line was a bit different - signalling had over the years involved both the LNER and the GWR and the line operated under Joint Committee Rules & Regulations.  Following nationalisation the Joint Line went to WR management subsequently transferring in the late 1960s to the LMR and finally back to WR operational management in late 1987.

 

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Thanks everyone. Aylesbury it is; which explains the presence of a 115 DMU and the TCL. 

 

The strange thing is that I visited Aylesbury station a few times in the early 1970s but didn't recognise it at all from the photo (or the Robert Carroll one TBH). Everything there just looks so rural. 

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, jonny777 said:

The problem with Aylesbury as my reading of the maps are concerned, is that the north end should have a footbridge between the platforms. 

Where do you think the photographer is standing?

 

Edit: Sorry, Edwin has already remarked upon this.

Edited by Joseph_Pestell
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I came across this image in a negative strip I was scanning. 

 

Not in the UK obviously, but are there some European experts out there who can fill in some vital details on this rother grainy photo, please? 

 

 

 

2020-09-04-0013.jpg.dca56c2b6bb976549aacfbcfece26b69.jpg

 

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The loco is an FS class 735, 100 built by ALCO in 1917 and 300 from Montreal loco in 1919, so most likely you’re in Italy. The surroundings suggest a repair shop rather than a running shed, otherwise?

would that be a weighbridge the lorry is standing on?

Edited by Northroader
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Is that lettering beside the lorry cab? If so, is it legible on your original?

And is that electrification wiring in the foreground? Although that wouldn't narrow it down much.

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No, the lettering is not readable when the image is expanded. 

 

Another photo appeared on the same strip, and might be nearby to the first one. 

 

 

612781736_italiansteam3.jpg.ab3738968e26695e18b8463716f4cb8e.jpg

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18 hours ago, Northroader said:

would that be a weighbridge the lorry is standing on?

If I had to take a wild guess, I would say that the lorry is also a rail vehicle, and the structure in front of it, its refuelling point.

 

D

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The other picture is a class 851 0-6-0T,  210 of these built 1898-1918, becoming one of the standard shunting engines found all over the system. Here it’s acting as a carriage pilot. There’s a neat row of starting signals, is the place a terminus?The nearest carriage, possibly the one tone Castanato with an aluminium roof introduced 1961. The carriages further back are the two tone Castanato / Isabella scheme 1936 -1980.

Theres a lot of knitting up above, but the complication looks due to a scissors crossing underneath, and it’s standard 3000 volts, not three phase, so it still could be pretty well anywhere, until you can match the background.

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I’m guessing that the photos date from the 1960s, as both the 735 and 851 classes barely survived into the ‘seventies.  Apart from some 735s sold into industrial service, the last use of the class by FS seems to have been based on Rimini, and from there to Ravenna.  From what I remember, examples of the 735 played a starring role in “Von Ryan’s Express”, outshining that well-known railway modeller, Frank Sinatra.

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Back to the UK with this one, but I still don't recognise the location. 

 

There seems to be a strange platform arrangement but the track has been removed. 

 

 

2020-09-06-0008.jpg.c6a4492f957b08f0d41943f0ffd146c7.jpg

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