Jump to content

7mm VIX Ferry Van Kit


Recommended Posts

Hi Pete,

 

The wagon looks really tempting. By researching I found that it was built starting in 1962. Am I right? Does anybody know how far south in continental Europe these wagons were coming? I would be tempted for my greek theme....

 

Cheers

Andreas

No reason that they couldn't have worked as far as Greece, or anywhere else in Europe which used standard-gauge track, though whether they did is another matter. I have seen other BR Ferry vehicles in Italy, whilst someone saw a BR Ferry Van in what was then Yugoslavia.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Fat Controller,

 

It looks tempting. There has been the opposite, greek ferry wagons coming to the UK in the 60s so I guess the other way round could also be the case....desicions, desicions....

 

Cheers

Andreas

In one of the older Barrowmere Diagram books dedicated to Ferry Wagons, some of the Diagrams have notes (often hand-written) indicating route restrictions to which individual types were subject. The notes for the Greek vehicles included restrictions on the Isle of Wight, Hayling Island and Wenford Bridge lines. I would love to hear how some of these restrictions came about: did someone send an OSR van to Wenford Bridge to pick up bagged china clay, only for it to get stuck between two buildings..?

The Barrowmere books are to be found here:- http://www.barrowmoremrg.co.uk/Prototype.html

The one to look at is this one : British Railways - Ferry Vehicles Diagram Book contributed by Clive Mortimore of this parish. It's a lot earlier than the other Ferry Wagon books, and has some fascinating drawings.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No reason that they couldn't have worked as far as Greece, or anywhere else in Europe which used standard-gauge track, though whether they did is another matter. I have seen other BR Ferry vehicles in Italy, whilst someone saw a BR Ferry Van in what was then Yugoslavia.

 

Certainly no reason why not, although British owned ferry wagons (and particularly BR administration owned) were relatively thin on the ground - until these LWB 'UIC-ORE type 3' vans were built the Brits had always provided the boats and the linkspans and continental railways the rolling stock (with a few notable exceptions).

 

I've certainly seen photo's of a BR VIX at Bad Shandau on the German/Czechoslovakian border, and in Stuttgart RBf. There were quite strict rules on ferry vans in the UK - the priority was to return them to the continent PDQ, and they could be back-loaded, but only if it was in broadly the right direction i.e. you could send an Italian van to most of southern Europe, but couldn't send it northward to Scandinavia or northern Germany. 

 

There were a batch of Greek ferry vans that were shared with Czech and supplied by the UN IIRC?

 

Jon

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Pete,

 

The wagon looks really tempting. By researching I found that it was built starting in 1962. Am I right? Does anybody know how far south in continental Europe these wagons were coming? I would be tempted for my greek theme....

 

Cheers

Andreas

 

There is this example which shows a load of loos for Bagdad - not sure what the correct routing for that would be?

http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/brferryvan/hF8652F#h66d6c5ca

 

there were two batches of these vans 1962 from Pressed Steel(contractor), and 1963 from Ashford (BR) but I can't say if there were differences between the two types.

 

Jon

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Fat Controller,

 

It looks tempting. There has been the opposite, greek ferry wagons coming to the UK in the 60s so I guess the other way round could also be the case....desicions, desicions....

 

Cheers

Andreas

Note this is to 1/43.5 scale, not sure what scale you use but many continental European models are 1/45.
Link to post
Share on other sites

There is this example which shows a load of loos for Bagdad - not sure what the correct routing for that would be?

http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/brferryvan/hF8652F#h66d6c5ca

 

there were two batches of these vans 1962 from Pressed Steel(contractor), and 1963 from Ashford (BR) but I can't say if there were differences between the two types.

 

Jon

Jon,

 

The scroll irons were different.  I think the kit is of the earlier type, I'll check out my pictures..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Over the New Year period during a short Dry time I managed to add some colour to the Vix kit when I get chance if the weather allows I will try to get some gloss varnish on the model ready for the decals.

 

post-6665-0-72972600-1452441910_thumb.jpg

 

post-6665-0-21901300-1452441914_thumb.jpg

 

post-6665-0-99102700-1452441916_thumb.jpg

 

post-6665-0-74695600-1452441919_thumb.jpg

 

post-6665-0-65635100-1452441921_thumb.jpg

 

Pete

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Ian

 

I would certanly sell the frames as a seperate kit I can think of several wagon types that the frames could be used for as in real life.

 

I'm exhibiting Peters Street 4mm Layout at the Stafford show 6th & 7th and I will have the wagon with me if anyone wants a look?

 

Pete

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 years later...

No reason that they couldn't have worked as far as Greece, or anywhere else in Europe which used standard-gauge track, though whether they did is another matter. I have seen other BR Ferry vehicles in Italy, whilst someone saw a BR Ferry Van in what was then Yugoslavia.

 

The question as to which British ferry vehicles appeared in Italy has appeared on an Italian forum.  Can you remember which ones you saw?

 

http://www.forum-duegieditrice.com/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=99375

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.