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Christleton Junction - 1986 - It’s back (or it will be)

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'The Reality'

 

Christleton would have been a relatively inconspicuous village south east of Chester, had it not been for an anti-railway landowner on the outskirts of Chester in the late 1840’s. Lord George Scott unintentionally created a future mecca for train spotters in the North West. Following the completion of the Crewe to Chester Railway and the onward link to Holyhead, the Birkenhead, Lancashire and Cheshire Railway sought to decrease the Manchester to Chester journey time and cut out the need to travel via Crewe. The original intention was to run directly from Warrington to Chester, and many current maps incorrectly reflect that route. Lord Scott’s refusal to sell land, and his influence with the city council, led the BL&CR to build the route and join the Crewe lines just south of Chester. Despite numerous proposals, the connection could not be made to get a direct lead into Chester station and so they settled for a Warrington to Crewe connection, leading to the creation of a station at Christleton with reversal platforms to allow trains to run from Manchester to Holyhead. Of course in the early days of railways, a loco change half way between Manchester and Holyhead was positively welcomed and only in later days did it become something of a nuisance. In the Heyday of steam it became a must visit spot for school boys keen to see black 5s, patriots and jubilees coming and going, particularly on the summer holiday trains from Yorkshire and the North East. The South to North connection had another advantage; the Christleton loop became a diversionary route for the West Coast mainline and was often used to relieve pressure on the main line. Cross country services from the South coast to Scotland became regular callers at Christleton to allow better connections from Holyhead to the North. In the late 60’s the loop was included in the West Coast electrification programme, although the mooted wiring onward to Holyhead never happened, so the terminal platforms and yard were never electrified.

 

In the summer of 1986, Christleton was still a favourite with enthusiasts keen to see the last days of the Peaks reversing on the trans-pennine services, watching the electric to diesel loco changes on the Euston – Holyheads, the varied traction heading for the North Wales coast and the plethora of trains diverted off the West Coast. Reduced to being a sub-shed of Crewe at this stage, the stabling points for both diesel and electric were nevertheless still firm favourites for loco fans, being just off the platform ends.

 

The real surprise is that it hasn’t been modelled before…

 

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The Model

 

The layout has been a long time coming and is the result of several years of being a background rmweb reader. Having renovated a Victorian house over the last 10 years, planning permission was received last year for a railway in the cellar, which put an end to 20 plus years of model railway wilderness.

 

They say plagiarism is the highest form of complement, so there should be a number of flattered authors on rmweb. Essentially I’ve stolen all the bits I like about other people’s railways and combined them into my own plan. I want to model the transitional years from blue and grey to sectorisation, running the diesels and electrics I remember from my youth. An 85 on intercity and a 45 on trans-pennine wasn’t an easy combination to mix, but eventually the idea for Christleton Junction formed into a sort of believable concept. With the cellar renovated and the sub-boards built, I decided it was finally time to open the rmweb closet door and step into the light.

 

Before I move on to the next stage, which I think is to start cutting wood for baseboards, I thought it would be useful to gather some views from the rmweb community and gain from the benefit of the combined experience of others. I have drafted the first track plan using Anyrail based on Peco pointwork, although it is my intention to use Marcway or handbuilt track for the scenic areas. I’m currently thinking templot may be required.

 

The backstory has been developed to allow me to have a continuous run and a terminus in one. The station is entirely fictional although I have tried to design it in keeping with LNWR practice as subsequently modified by BR for electrification. I originally started with Huddersfield in mind, and some parts may well end up along those lines, although I’m not sure Yorkshire stone is right for Cheshire.

 

I’ve designed the layout against the following operating possibilities, with a specific period of September 1986:

 

Euston – Holyhead intercity services. Aircon mk 2s in blue grey and intercity, with traction changing from electric (85, 86, 87) to diesel (47) and vice versa. Some services may change traction at Crewe to allow testing of locos from Crewe works.

 

Anglo – Scottish interregional services, mixed mk 2 con blue grey rakes, with the odd intercity coach, hauled by 85s and 86s.

 

Transpennine services, reversing in the terminal platforms, hauled by 45s and 47s. Mk 2 non-air con, with the first of the trans pennine livery coaches appearing, plus the other random liveries that Heaton used to put out. And a first real modelling challenge to create some sealed beam class 45s!

 

Cardiff / Crewe – Bangor / Holyhead services, mk 1s, class 33 and 47 hauled. Did these occasionally get 25 or 31 hauled?

 

Manchester – Holyhead loco hauled relief services, mk 1s, 47 hauled. Reversing in the terminal platforms.

 

Stoke – Llandudno loco hauled, mk 1s, 47s and maybe D200!

 

Crewe – Warrington EMU local service, a chance to build some 305 / 310 kits.

 

Parcels trains have various options and can be 25, 31 or 47 hauled. I’m not sure if Newspaper trains would be an option in 86?

 

A couple of DMUs should also be able to potter around.

 

On the freight side there are a number of through freights, including MGR, steel, tanks and freightliner with haulage by 20, 25, 31, 45, 47 plus some electrics. I’m not sure 37s or 56s would be appropriate?

 

The layout allows for some speedlink and permanent way train shunting, so 25, 31 and 47 again, with the bonus of an ex 40 in the shape of a 97. As well as an 08 or two, I think the Chester area was one of the last to have 03s – it is certainly going to be!

 

My draft layout plan is below, together with a few iphone shots of the room. The sub-boards go most of the way around, no additional legs should be needed. On the future station site, the first rolling stock and some Marcway templates are laid out to give me an impression of how it will look. I welcome your thoughts before I make any regrettable mistakes!

 

Andy

 

 

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General view of the station area.

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The station, with a class 40 in the bay and the 37 on the down main.

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The station area again. The BG sits in what will be platform 5, with some speedlink wagons in the yard.

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An overview of the fiddle yard area, where the Warrington and Holyhead lines come in.

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The other end of the fiddle yard.

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The area where the through lines will be. I may need a couple of baseboard legs here.

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Edited by 61656
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Hi Andy,

 

Such an interesting and well presented background to what appears to be the making of a fabulous railway. You look to have made a fantastic start and with such a cracking space to use also this has all the makings of a fabulous project.

Will be following this one!

Enjoy,

 

John

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Looking forward to this one. Looks really excellent so far and love your plan, history and your intended mix of rolling stock

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This weekend I hope to get chance to do some more work with the Marcway templates to see if I can get them to provide the smooth flowing trackwork that I'm hoping for. I will probably roll out some lining paper to sketch the plain line sections to see how it fits. One of the challenges is that I want the sharply curved section in the 4 tracks of the station to be hidden by an overall roof and to then gently curve through the station throat area, however I'm not sure how achievable this is going to be with set track. The main issue is the curved crossover between the through lines; really the crossover needs to be a on a transitional curve.

 

The alternative is to use templot and build my own pointwork. I have no real issue with this, having previously built SMP and C&L, aside from time. There are around 30 points in the visible area and that could take me a lifetime to finish! It's hard to balance my desire for perfection with an equal desire to have a working railway. It may be easier to move the crossover!

 

Also today, the postman brought 2 GUVs with him. There's something satisfying about the postal service delivering the postal service. The 2 GUVs were immediately pressed into service on the Christleton test track. My original intention had been to have a small layout and slowly build up some rolling stock whilst planning the main railway. 3 months after construction began and already the rolling stock is too numerous to all fit on the test layout, plus the size of it means it is always in the way. Plan 2 was to simply discard the test layout and crack on. The Head of Operations (2 years old) has decreed that he's not happy with this plan and demands that continuing operations are maintained. It looks like the test track will have a reprieve for a short while yet!

 

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This photo shows that, if nothing else, an iphone and a few halogens aren't really sufficient for decent pictures!

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... did you buy them off eBay... from me? If you did then I hope you're happy with them. (Also what a ridiculously small world this is lol.)

Edited by sub39h

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I did, and isn't it? Me and a 2 year old very happy with them. He'd worked out it was trains even before opening the package. He's going to have to learn to keep his excitement levels quieter if we're not going to give the whole game away to Mrs 61656!

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Welcome to RMWeb Andy.

 

I like your back story, and the track plan looks pretty good.

I assume you have worked through all the likely moves that need to be made?

Can you easily reach the parcels sidings?

 

Regarding your planned locos and stock, since no-one else has offered any thoughts yet, I think newspaper trains did still run beyond 1986 with ECS to Red Bank.

 

Loco wise, class 56s worked flyash trains to Llandudno Junction earlier in 1983, may they have worked MGR trains ex Point of Ayr colliery also?

Class 37s worked on running in turns from Crewe Works around that time, though I don't know whether they worked freight traffic.

The last use of class 03s in the area was at Birkenhead I think.

And I think you couild definitely justify several DMUs, Chester had plenty.

 

cheers

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Welcome to RMWeb Andy.

 

I like your back story, and the track plan looks pretty good.

I assume you have worked through all the likely moves that need to be made?

Can you easily reach the parcels sidings?

 

Regarding your planned locos and stock, since no-one else has offered any thoughts yet, I think newspaper trains did still run beyond 1986 with ECS to Red Bank.

 

Loco wise, class 56s worked flyash trains to Llandudno Junction earlier in 1983, may they have worked MGR trains ex Point of Ayr colliery also?

Class 37s worked on running in turns from Crewe Works around that time, though I don't know whether they worked freight traffic.

The last use of class 03s in the area was at Birkenhead I think.

And I think you couild definitely justify several DMUs, Chester had plenty.

 

cheers

Thanks, exactly the kind of questions I was hoping for. The version of the plan shown in the original post is about iteration 5, and crucially not all my intended moves have been run through theoretically on this version, so you've highlighted some issues.. Most of my iterations have been about getting the electric to diesel loco switch to work in each direction and how to get the trans-pennines to reverse without locking up the whole layout. The current version of the plan works well for passenger and parcels workings, but is less satisfactory for engineering and speedlink trains. One thing that laying the templates out has shown me is that there is more space at the front of the layout than I thought and also in the corner opposite the station, both are now possible siding spaces. The area currently marked as parcels is something of a modeller's trap, being 1600mm from front to back corner. Only Pratchet's librarian will be reaching that far on a regular basis. Currently you could walk on the sub-boards (there's a height restriction, not a weight one), but the main boards will probably be much lighter  in construction,so the back corners need some thought. Linked to this is couplings; I am probably going to go down the kadee route, which makes remote coupling possible, but I don't really think they look right on freight stock. All terminal platforms will be awkward for access to uncouple locos due to station roofing and canopies, so some form of auto-uncoupling is essential.

 

The next version of the plan will therefore have to think about some more sidings, and take into account how I'm going to uncouple stock. I'm reluctant to lose the space at the front of the layout as I would like the running lines to be higher than their surroundings. 

 

I'd love to justify a 56, but have only seen photos in about the '83 period you mention. I remember them on MGR workings crawling through stations and then making a great noise accelerating hard when they got the road, something that should be possible at Christleton. I dare say with sound, a pair of 20s will be an acceptable substitute!

 

Having received a sound class 40 as a present, I invested in the Bachmann sound starter set (just so I could hear the 40!), which comes with an RETB fitted 37/4. This would be seemingly inappropriate for the layout, however I have a picture of a couple of the same class running along the coast in 1986 on the Crewe test train, but I think that's the only 'regular' working of 37s in that period. It's quite hard to believe as they seemed to be absolutely everywhere at the time. 

 

Empties to red bank would be interesting, as they should reverse at Christleton. The terminal platforms being too short means that they would have to do this on the through lines, possibly picking up a couple more empties from the yard (courtesy of an 03...).

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There's been quite a lot of theoretical work since Kevin's (Rivercider) post, with some rework to the track plan. I briefly experimented with Templot, but decided that's for people with a lot more free time, plus I'm never likely to make my own track! I struggled to work through a number of movements on the laptop screen before deciding that I much prefer to work at 1.76 scale. I've therefore run out some lining paper and using the Marcway templates and some lengths of Peco, I've started to build up what it will really look like. The Peco will eventually form part of the fiddle yard -  I have a couple of lengths of Exactoscale fast track bought by a friend - there's no doubt it looks better (although I need words with him about the '30 seconds' to assemble) and should be a better match for the Marcway points.

 

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The revised track plan has a number of alterations to it:

 

1. I realised I couldn't terminate a train on the Up Main, to reverse when running Warrington to Holyhead. As the terminal platforms are of limited length, any summer excursion trains will need to run round in the through platforms. This means the crossover has moved from the platform area to the station approach.

 

2. I wasn't happy with the loco stabling. The original plan had locos reversing 4 or 5 times to get from stabling to train, plus the electric stabling was a facing point from the Up main, which didn't really look right. Moving all the stabling to the free corner will also allow me to have the track raised above the scenic area, with a curved retaining wall at the front of the layout. The loco stabling also offers the option of some half relief engine sheds; I like the idea of the diesels being in a run down former steam shed, but with some modern stabling for the electrics.

 

3. I have also added some more sidings. These still need some work as I would like a speedlink yard and possibly a couple of engineers'  sidings.

 

 

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The first picture shows the track for the 4 through roads in the station. It's important to get this curve right as it really dictates where the rest of the station fits. As ever with model railways, it's a compromise between radius and available space. Also shown in the shot is Christleton's new arrival in platform 3 - a flush fronted peak, found by amazing chance on eBay (I must have searched just seconds after it went on and luckily 'buy it now' was available). The 45 is where the platform ends of the two main bay platforms will be (3 & 4).

 

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The next shot shows an overview of the station area - the buildings are just to give a feel for size, they won't form part of the final layout. The sidings at the back are all reachable, although probably not enough for 3 link couplings to be practical.

 

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The final photo gives an overview of the station throat; I still have some work to do to get the pointwork to flow in a realistic manner. There is still a little playing around to do before I'm brave enough to order the points and cut the baseboard tops. In the meantime I'm sat by the letterbox waiting for a Howes sound chip to arrive!

 

Comments and suggestions welcome as always.

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I'm sure I didn't say "30 seconds"...  Maybe a compromise in the pointwork would be to buy in most and just hand-build the tricky crossover bits?

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It's been a little while since I posted any progress, but that's not to say there hasn't been any. The volume of empty ale bottles in the recycling bin gives only a hint of the amount of talking that has been done! The fundamental track layout has remained unchanged, although the station throat has undergone several iterations trying to get it right. I've also sketched out the fiddle yard, which was a lot more complicated than I'd anticipated - essentially I want 3 terminal fiddle yards, with sidings so locos can get on the other end of the train without the need for any manual handling, but I also want a number of roads with a through connection, to allow trains to go endlessly round.

 

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The first photo shows the revised layout, including the placement of locos and coaches to check that the platforms are long enough. The lining paper shows where the trackbed will be raised above the adjacent areas

With the paper tinkering phase over, the first 4 baseboard tops have been cut, which feels like quite a momentous step. They are cut from 6mm ply using lining paper as templates. I cut each one and then fiddle with the adjacent templates to get a good fit. Once I've done the 7 which will form the scenic side, the framing will be built up. This will be fairly complicated, as having kitchen units under the baseboards rather than conventional legs means access for wiring etc. will be limited, combined with 4 of the boards being open plan. Once I have the front boards finished I will undertake a final check of the track layout and make the big order to Marcway for points - I think there are nearly 40 of them!

 

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The second shot shows the first 4 board tops; they'll eventually sit about 100mm above the sub-board, which should give clearance for whatever point motors I choose and allow the incoming lines to be raised on a viaduct, similar to Manchester Oxford Road.

Away from the layout build, I've also been to see the nice folks at DCC supplies near Worcester and had a play with their comprehensive selection of DCC controllers on their test layout - the NCE power cab currently looks like a winner. The rolling stock fleet continues to grow too, another peak has found its way here and will shortly be joined by a 25/2 (doubling the fleet of locos without 16 wheels...).

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Wednesday evenings, or Model Railway Wednesdays as they are correctly known, tend to see the best progress of the week. Tonight I cut out the last 3 scenic baseboard tops.

 

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The first picture shows the Crewe end of the layout, which is the main station area. I've managed to resist the temptation to undermine the 3 storey chimney breast and the baseboard narrows a little here. To the left are the first of the point templates which show where the scenic section will start with a simple divergence into 4 roads, with a couple of sidings for electric loco stabling.

 

 

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The second photo shows the raised section, which will be on viaduct / retaining wall, with the diesel shed in the background. To the right is the entrance to the Warrington and North Wales fiddle yards. I've only had the board loosely in place for 30 minutes and I've already decided I don't like bending down to go underneath it!

 

Next job is to get the templates back on the baseboard tops and start drawing out the baseboard frames, trying to avoid point machines whilst still giving some much need strength to the tops.

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My focus has recently been on designing the baseboard frames, which is as straightforward as calculating the length by the width in some cases, but gets a little trickier in the open plan sections. I realised quite quickly that the height of the viaduct was key to setting the frame heights. My original intention was to make the frames with 100mm x 9mm ply, in part because it would be high enough for any point motors but mainly because I'm the sort of person that finds whole numbers reliably satisfying. 

 

My intention is that the raised section will look something like the viaducts between Manchester Piccadilly and Oxford Road. I wondered if 100mm might be on the low side for such an impressive structure, so tried guessing how high the viaducts might actually be. Guess work being engineering for the foolish, I thought it may be more practical to look at the Metcalfe viaduct kit, as there's a reasonable chance that that will be used by the main contractor. That kit is 132mm high, which is 33 feet, or just over 10m; that sounded quite high, particularly when I worked out that's even higher than a 3 storey house. With all this chance calculation, there was no course of action left but to actually measure the real thing. Fortunately the nice people at Google make such things easy these days, and street view soon provided enough images with items of a known height in the picture to work out the bridge deck is about 6.25m off the floor. Which is 82mm. By coincidence, I was planning the lower frames to be made out of 18 x 34 mm timber, meaning the main board frames will need to be 100mm high. The outcome is the same, but it now feels like a gratifyingly engineered number, and even more satisfying.

 

Anyway, to make sure the thing will look about right, because there's no point being correct but looking horrible, I cut some 82mm blocks and placed one of the boards on them to get a feel for it. 

 

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The first shot shows a new 25 (in need of some love in the handrail department), with a Metcalfe terrace of shops just shown for context. The shops are actually where the road will be, so if they do end up there we can expect some form of heated debate between client and contractor.

 

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I can never resist lining up a few more bits of stock,just to see what things will look like. The 37 and 45 are on shed, which almost certainly won't be the Metcalfe one.

 

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Another shot, in which you can see the curve, although only loosely in place, isn't really all that smooth. There's sort of a kink in the board caused by curved point geometry. I will have a play with the flexi track and templates, but I think this board may get re-cut.

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I am really liking the look of this, Great work so far.

I would keep the class 37/4 they were working the central Wales line during your time period. During 1988 a 37/4 used to work a Fridays only Cardiff - Rhyl and return. So why not run it on some Cardiff trains. The class 33s took over from the class 25s on the Cardiff - Crewe trains in about 84 I think. But if a class 33 failed or Crewe were short of power class 25 did sometimes turn up.

 

All the best with the layout build. Cheers Peter.

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I am really liking the look of this, Great work so far.

I would keep the class 37/4 they were working the central Wales line during your time period. During 1988 a 37/4 used to work a Fridays only Cardiff - Rhyl and return. So why not run it on some Cardiff trains. The class 33s took over from the class 25s on the Cardiff - Crewe trains in about 84 I think. But if a class 33 failed or Crewe were short of power class 25 did sometimes turn up.

 

All the best with the layout build. Cheers Peter

Peter,

 

Thanks for your comments - you've doubtless spotted a few similarities to Llanbourne, which is definitely one of the biggest influences on not only my layout but also my rekindled interest in the hobby. Having devoured the hundreds of pages of Llanbourne, I've developed something similar and hopefully picked up on a few of your self confessed lessons or wishes if you could start again. All that said, progress would definitely be quicker if I stopped spending so much time reading about your layout and put some effort into mine!

 

The 37/4 will definitely stay, I've become a real fan of it in the last few months. It will probably work a few trains as ex-works on a Crewe-Holyhead service. Having created and electrified a Crewe-Warrington loop on the WCML, I've also switched the point at which traction changes from electric to diesel, so I'm not sure if Crewe works will have to send the 37 up light engine (would they risk it?) or if it will take over at Crewe. I dare say the timetabling department will be sending me a memo on it, as they won't want to be building in allowances at two stations en route.

 

I haven't yet found a picture of a 25 on passenger in 1986, by which time everything seemed to be a 47 except for the 33s and 45s. I have a couple of them on parcels though.

 

Between us we have made the route an operators headache though, with two reversals in 40 miles. Although 3 different peaks between Manchester and Bangor would certainly be popular with haulage fans!

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Hi,

I am glad Llanbourne help you get started again. There are a few things I would do differently but I will stick with it for now. You wouldn't believe how many times I have thought about putting up some overhead wires. I think what has stopped me is I like my Semaphores too much.

 

I had a quick look through some old Rail Enthusiast mags tonight as I was sure a few rats worked Passenger around Chester back in 86. It seems a few worked forwards from Chester to Manchester on Trans- Pennine services when a class 45 or 47 failed in the Chester area. Even a few Euston services had assistance from class 25s.

One report even shows a small pic of a class 25/9 arriving at Crewe with a failed 33201 in tow.  The July 86 issue has a pic of 25259 leaving Newport on a service from Bangor. The caption says. "Summer's here! No. 25259 departs Newport with the IN06 14;17 Bangor - Cardiff on April 29. Once class 25s were rostered on the Crewe-Cardiff trains. Now they are a rarity." 

Another one in the Sept 86 issue. Says " What might be the last working of a class 25 on the Cardiff- Crewe corridor took place by accident on June 16 when 33015 failed in the Crewe area and 25279 was called upon to deputise on the 13:45 Manchester- Cardiff. The return leg, 18:15 Cardiff- Manchester, employed 37255 CF."

 

On Llanbourne I often use a class 25 as station pilot as I remember seeing several reports of this happening at Holyhead when the 08 failed.

 

Cheers Peter.

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Good bit of gen that Peter. I often think the research is the most fun part of it all, although that's probably just because I'm staring down the barrel of a million screws to make the baseboards. 25s will certainly be on stand by, particularly to work a train forward to the coast. My station pilot will be an 08 most of time, with a 03 in the yard. Chester was the last place allocated an 03 I think, although it was just a paper based allocation by 1986 I suspect. I'm sure I've seen a picture of one at Chester in 86, but the lack of coupling rods is probably a bit more than cutting back on maintenance!

 

I thought long and hard about overhead line as I considered semaphores too, but have a slight preference to capture the big power boxes built in the 70's with a large geographical relay interlocking. Most of the resignalling schemes on the LM left the old boxes as ground frames or similar - in fact I remember that all the Pendolinos when new where maintained in depots controlled by a mechinical box.

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Today has seen the construction of board 1, which feels fairly momentous! The board is straightforward, being the only scenic board with 4 right angles. It's 6mm ply on top and 9mm ply round the edges framed with 18 x 34mm planed timber. At the moment there is no bracing, and some fairly rudimentary manual flexing of the board suggests that none will be required, although it may get some mid board support as those 16 wheeled Sulzers have a realistic weight about them. The first two pictures show the basics of the construction.

 

Normally when I'm doing any kind of woodwork I like to glue and screw everything, but the forces involved in model railways don't seem to justify it, so it is all just screwed. I'll be interested to know what others think. The absence of glue does make future alteration more practical.

 

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The final photo shows the board in its intended location, complete with point templates and a class 37 in the electric loco stabling sidings - these will probably extend off the board slightly onto the first fiddle yard board, with a diagonal road bridge across the top.

 

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Just another 6 boards to go and then I can start to think about track laying. Or at least all the things I need to do before track laying, like cork, securing the boards together and wiring runs. 

 

Board 7 will require some though yet, as I've decided it definitely needs to be hinged. Luckily right in the middle of a double junction.... I'm hoping that if I drink enough ale during the construction of the next 5 boards, a moment of inspiration will provide an easy solution.

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A spare hour this evening has seen board 2 assembled. One of the simpler boards in theory, although the curved front proved to be trickier than I'd assumed - 9mm ply may wobble like a jelly when you carry it across the B&Q car park, but it's like an RSJ when you try to curve it along the front of the layout. Still, I'm happy with how it looks and it is nice and solid next to board 1. There's a bit of neatening up to do with the plane and sander before it's finished. Board 4 is the adjacent curved board, which will have to marry up to it and I'll need to see how that looks before making a final judgement. 2 down, 5 to go.

 

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This week I also got a copy of the excellent book 'Diesels in Mid and North Wales', which shows a Mossend to Dee Marsh steel train as well as a Warringtion to Dee Marsh speedlink service. This adds a new freight flow that I hadn't previously considered which involves both a reversal and a change in traction. I need to get the layout plan out again to see how this will work, as I hadn't planned on wiring the sidings. It also means I probably need to increase my electric loco stabling.

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Nice work on the base boards you will be laying track in no time.

 

I also have Diesels in North and Mid Wales, it's like my bible so much good info. Two other books I have that I find very useful are 'Freight Only' Vol 3 Wales & Scotland, and 'Colour of the North Wales Main Line' by Larry Goddard.

 

Cheers Peter.

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A very nice project. Set in a nice era too, you get the best of all liveries. I will enjoy watching your developments.

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A very nice project. Set in a nice era too, you get the best of all liveries. I will enjoy watching your developments.

Thanks. The period took a lot of choosing - I wanted peaks and 40's, plus the new sectorisation liveries. I have an odd sense of prototypical - I don't mind a fictional location, but I want all the trains to be 'real' - without stretching the timelines too far.

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Nice work on the base boards you will be laying track in no time.

 

I also have Diesels in North and Mid Wales, it's like my bible so much good info. Two other books I have that I find very useful are 'Freight Only' Vol 3 Wales & Scotland, and 'Colour of the North Wales Main Line' by Larry Goddard.

 

Cheers Peter.

I'd like to have a train running by Christmas, but it depends mainly on work and two small boys as to how much I can make progress.

 

I already have the Larry Goddard book, which really helped cement all my ideas into place. I'll look out for the freight only book too, it's easy to forget just how varied the freight was as recently as the 80's. Large locos pulling a couple of vans about seems like it should have stopped 50 years earlier!

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You could have oil trains off / to Stanlow running via Hooton (rev) and then Chester / Christleton to Crewe and beyond.

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