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Chris64B

Model Railway Restoration - Painting the Viaduct and Retaining Walls and Point Mods

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Welcome to the forum, if you want to see the master of resurrection on this site visit Coachmann's Ellesmere thread, he lifts and relays more track than Network Rail.

 

I am sure there is a lot you can do to recover this model which looks perfect for your children.

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Chris welcome to the forum.

 

When i lifter my roundy layout in the loft at my parents many moons ago I used the foam underlay to protect rolling stock in boxes. however it deteriorated as per in your photos and made a mess of the wheels. Luckily the wheels cleaned up OK.

 

If you want to replace it under the track without lifting the track you may be able to scrape out a small length of it, ballast the cleaned up area then do the next section once the ballast is dry. You would have to  be careful not to disturb the track in order to keep it level though.

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Welcome to the forum, if you want to see the master of resurrection on this site visit Coachmann's Ellesmere thread, he lifts and relays more track than Network Rail.

 

I am sure there is a lot you can do to recover this model which looks perfect for your children.

 

Thanks Woodenhead! I'll check it out as I'm just embarking on lifting and replacing some of the trackwork - I've learned loads from browsing the forum so far!

 

I'm hoping that as well as giving them something to play with it will still have enough operating interest for me (and them when they get older) and I can really get stuck in on the modelling and scenic side which I really enjoy.

 

Cheers,

Chris

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Chris welcome to the forum.

 

When i lifter my roundy layout in the loft at my parents many moons ago I used the foam underlay to protect rolling stock in boxes. however it deteriorated as per in your photos and made a mess of the wheels. Luckily the wheels cleaned up OK.

 

If you want to replace it under the track without lifting the track you may be able to scrape out a small length of it, ballast the cleaned up area then do the next section once the ballast is dry. You would have to  be careful not to disturb the track in order to keep it level though.

 

Thanks Roundhouse! I was quite impressed at just how bad the underlay has got, especially considering it's been in the dark all these years.

 

I'm definately going to lift and relay all the trackwork - there is damage here and there from the track pins, a couple of the points need replacing and I might adjust the design in a couple of places. I'll probably re-lay it on cork too - will be asking more questions along those lines soon although there's a wealth of info on it here! 

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Looking at those photos I feel you might be better off scrapping the layout and starting again. You could salvage the buildings, but if you already intend to renew the track you might as well do so on a new baseboard. That will give you much better results in the long run.

 

Geoff Endacott

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I will be following your progress with interest, whatever you decide to do.

 

Mike

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Looking at those photos I feel you might be better off scrapping the layout and starting again. You could salvage the buildings, but if you already intend to renew the track you might as well do so on a new baseboard. That will give you much better results in the long run.

 

Geoff Endacott

 

Hiya Geoff, Yes that thought crossed my mind too more than once, although for various reasons I'm planning to stick with it I think:

  • Despite its age the baseboard is in excellent condition and still straight, level and strong. It's an 8x4 hardwood ply sheet braced underneath and the upper level helps in this regard too - I've actually stregthend this level further now, pics to follow later.

     

  • Although they probably don't follow normal base building practice, the fact that it has the 'sides' all round means it can be tipped up and put against the garage wall quite safely when I need the space

     

  • It's all wired up so keeping this will save a massive amount of time, likewise building a new baseboard would expand the project to such a degree that I think I'd struggle to find the time to get it to the same sort of point if you see what I mean (the kids will have probably grown up and lost interest!) and I'm not sure I'd be able to justify the project as easily to 'the management'!!!

     

  • Most of the track is ok, just minor bits here and there need sorting rather than wholesale replacement.

     

  • Also there is some degree of sentimentality on my part - that it would be nice to get them playing with the same layout I used as a child!

Were there any particular aspects you were thinking of as causing problems?

 

Cheers,

Chris

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  • Also there is some degree of sentimentality on my part - that it would be nice to get them playing with the same layout I used as a child!

This is the most important reason to restore it. It's a good layout for the size so it would be fun for your kids to use.

 

I'm intrigued to know how the loop on the top level worked in terms of electrics.  Were there a couple of dead sections?

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Thanks Jon,

 

My dad is the electronics expert (he started as an electronics engineer for the MoD) so he set it up - the loop does have a sort of dead/isolated section between the point where the tracks join and the 'top' of the loop where there are some insulated fishplates.

 

When the train travels along the loop and gets to the halfway point, you have to throw a switch on ‘the fat controller’ to reverse the polarity on the next section of track so it can travel onwards, back towards the point. At least I think that’s how it worked, unfortunately this is one of the bits that seems to have stopped working and we haven’t been able to solve it so far.

 

I’m actually thinking I might remove the loop and replace the track work at the top with another feature (small goods yard, abandoned sidings, old quarry or something) with the track just running straight ‘off the board’ through some sort of scenic break. Although this removes the ‘fun’ loop feature, I wasn’t that keen on how close the loop ran to the edge of the upper level and it’s pretty tight as it is. I was struggling to think of how to integrate this into the scenery. Removing the loop also allows me to re-profile the shape of the upper level a bit and fit a couple of extra things in the yard (a headshunt and relocation of the signal box probably) – will be asking about that on the forums soon I think.

 

Cheers,

Chris

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Hi all,

 

Time for an update. Quite a long one so apologies in advance, I’m trying to catch up with where I am at the moment. Nearly there!

 

We’ve been playing trains quite a bit and by and large everything seems to be working quite well!

post-27854-0-96805300-1506624561_thumb.jpg

 

One of the more amusing games seems to be ‘chase the HST with the Class 09 shunter’ – it keeps up surprisingly well!

post-27854-0-65788300-1506624591_thumb.jpg

 

These photos show the layout on the garage floor still, but I’ve now purchased some excellent Stanley trestle legs which are height adjustable - http://www.toolventure.co.uk/hand-tools/st-70559.html so it’s now off the ground and much easier to work on etc. I would recommend these and this supplier (seemed to be the best price of not many stockists) if anyone is looking for some.

 

As for restoration progress, I’m managed to replace quite a bit of track and make a few other changes here and there – here’s a run down…

 

The first job was to see if I could remove the upper level to get better access to the track beneath. I started by lifting the track on the bridge to allow the top to come off:

post-27854-0-27460800-1506624618_thumb.jpg

 

The screw heads were pretty rusty and a few needed drilling out:

post-27854-0-73398200-1506624623_thumb.jpg

 

But, off it came!

post-27854-0-45326400-1506624633_thumb.jpg

 

 

Another job I wanted to tackle was moving one of the crossings from the far end of the layout, to be adjacent to the sidings entrance, so it would be easier to get trains in and out onto either line. This would hopefully also allow a short head shunt to be squeezed in so that shunting can take place without interfering with running on the main line. The only trouble is that working within the constraints of the existing layout means space is very tight as are the radii required but I’ll see what I can do!

 

First up, here is the existing crossing to be removed at the opposite end to the sidings – as you can see one of the points is actually a large radius Y so it will be good to get rid of this to make the line smoother:

post-27854-0-04237200-1506624638_thumb.jpg

 

Ta, da! All gone, with replacement flexitrack temporarily attached:

post-27854-0-50406700-1506624643_thumb.jpg

 

I needed a couple of new points which I purchased from Track Shack – amazing service! Ordered late one afternoon and they arrived the next morning!

post-27854-0-20544600-1506624716.jpg

 

Unfortunately this threw up one unexpected headache – new setrack ST 244/255 curved points are slightly different shape and length to old ones! See comparison shots below:

post-27854-0-43714700-1506624721_thumb.jpg

post-27854-0-62637100-1506624723.jpg

 

Here’s a quick shot of the current track layout near the yard entrance (I’d started lifting it but remembered to take a snap at the last minute!):

post-27854-0-25794200-1506624735.jpg

 

So I then started laying things out to see what might work – I really wanted to avoid the crossing being half in the tunnel:

post-27854-0-98017200-1506624713_thumb.jpg

 

It was all pretty close, but there were a few awkward bits and a gap that needed to be filled:

post-27854-0-56142300-1506624737.jpg

 

I had a go at making up a small extension piece which worked quite well:

post-27854-0-86338700-1506624739.jpg

 

And then had a go at opening up some of the points very slightly – Only a tiny difference but helped take some of the tension/awkward angles out here and there.

 

Before:

post-27854-0-94360200-1506624727_thumb.jpg

 

After:

post-27854-0-44696900-1506624732_thumb.jpg

 

In the end, I got it to all fit in fairly well in the space available:

post-27854-0-86146400-1506624882_thumb.jpg

 

Clearances seem ok and even the (admittedly old) Lima Class 50 can fit round the curve on the headshunt (might extend it by about an inch):

post-27854-0-22638700-1506624878_thumb.jpg

 

From the other direction (i.e. looking out of the tunnel when it goes back on):

post-27854-0-03038700-1506624936_thumb.jpg

 

It’s only loosely laid at the moment and I’m gathering the bits I need to lay it all properly and re-wire the point motors, droppers, etc. Been giving it all a good test and everything seems to run pretty smoothly through it so far.

 

Thanks for reading! :)

 

Chris

Edited by Chris64B
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That is one of the best 8X4 layouts I have ever seen, decent length platforms and a great period feel, an object lesson in what can be done by mixing streamline and set track and using every square inch of the 8X4.

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Great to see the progress you are making, and the planning you are doing to ensure that things do work.

 

Mike

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Hi again, thanks for the comments and positive feedback so far, much appreciated!

 

I've made a small amount of progress over the last few nights - managed to get some cork cut and glued (with PVA) and a first few lengths of track cleaned up and stuck down using a small amount of copydex - pleased with how well this worked having never used this method before. I put a thin layer roughly on the underside of each sleeper, pressed the track onto the cork lightly to leave an imprint and left it to dry for 10 mins or so, then pressed together (as you would an impact adhesive). Seems to work very effectively.

 

I've also made a couple of impulse loco purchases on Ebay - more details to follow...

 

P.S. I'm also trying the RMWeb photo upload so hope they work - hadn't realised you could do this!

 

 

post-27854-0-03118700-1454088421_thumb.jpg

post-27854-0-66654200-1454088425_thumb.jpg

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Afternoon! A lunctime update to show off some recent purchases from a well known auction site. :)

 

Seeing as I hadn't bought any locos or rolling stock since I was little, I couldn't resist having a look on Ebay and I was suprised by the amount of interesting stuff for sale. For now, I'm sticking to older (cheaper) stock that is happy to run on the tighter curves of my layout and will be a little bit more robsut when little hands are playing!

 

Saying that, I'm looking forward to getting down to some old fashioned moddleing in due course and adding details like handrails and buffer beam bits and giving them a light weathering as they all look a bit 'ex-works' at the moment.

 

So here they are.....

 

47528 - The Queen`s Own Mercian Yeomanry - I really fancied a 47 as I thought it could cover a lot of bases, passenger duties, parcels, etc. I was pleased to find this one as during my research I found that it was named in a ceremony at Worcester Shrub Hill in 1989 so fits the period and location I'm (loosely) modelling. Plus I think this livery suits them particularly well and gives a bit of variety B):

post-27854-0-85695300-1454420599_thumb.jpg

 

37180 - Sir Dyfed / County of Dyfed - Again, I 'needed' a 37 - a serious ommision from my early modelling years! This one fitted the bill nicely as I found a good few pictures of it around Gloucester in the late 1980s. I'm quite tempted to try fitting the shawplan (?) etched windows:

post-27854-0-75453400-1454421149_thumb.jpg

 

The pair of them 'on shed' (the hastily applied sky was to hide the clutter of the garage in the background!)

post-27854-0-06315500-1454421337_thumb.jpg

 

31467 - A nice, plain, run of the mill 31! - I've already got a 31 in railfreight red stripe but I thought another one in BR blue would be nice seeing as they were pretty common in the period:

post-27854-0-78978700-1454421284_thumb.jpg

 

I hadn't planned to buy three at once, but two were from the same seller so I got a bit of a deal - my wife's response when they all turned up on the same day was "why do you need more trains?!" My reply was the obvious one, "why do you need more clothes?" :laugh_mini2: :P

 

Cheers,

Chris

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"why do you need more trains?!" My reply was the obvious one, "why do you need more clothes?" :laugh_mini2: :P

 

And you still felt you'd lost . . . ;)

Nice work and yes the old scratchbuilds have stood the test of time well :)

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Three great locos there and a good base for adding extra details at a later date. I keep thinking about the Hornby Railroad Class 31 in BR Blue as it is such a good price now. They were as you say such a common sight in blue. Just curious what make is your 31?

 

If you get any sluggish running problems with older stock, I have found a bit of an oil to all the running bearing etc makes a positive difference.

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37180 - Sir Dyfed / County of Dyfed - Again, I 'needed' a 37 - a serious ommision from my early modelling years! This one fitted the bill nicely as I found a good few pictures of it around Gloucester in the late 1980s. I'm quite tempted to try fitting the shawplan (?) etched windows:

attachicon.gifDSC_0224.JPG

 

 

Cheers,

Chris

 

The etched windows make a huge difference to those loco's. It's not too diffucult either but worth getting the laser glaze to match.

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Three great locos there and a good base for adding extra details at a later date. I keep thinking about the Hornby Railroad Class 31 in BR Blue as it is such a good price now. They were as you say such a common sight in blue. Just curious what make is your 31?

If you get any sluggish running problems with older stock, I have found a bit of an oil to all the running bearing etc makes a positive difference.

Thanks Jaggz, sorry forgot to say they are all Lima models. The 37 and 47 are pretty much NOS and I don't think they've ever been run! They're already running better after a few runs round the layout! The 31 is a bit more used and needsbsome replacement buffers etc.

 

Agree that the 31s do respond well to basic detailing parts and adding those little ears on the front either side of the centre window (what are they actually?!). I think this Lima shell really captures the look and proportions of the prototype. Is the Hornby Railroad one based on the Lima shell?

 

 

The etched windows make a huge difference to those loco's. It's not too diffucult either but worth getting the laser glaze to match.

Thanks Scott, good plan! I need some snow ploughs for it too.

 

Cheers, Chris

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Agree that the 31s do respond well to basic detailing parts and adding those little ears on the front either side of the centre window (what are they actually?!).

Windscreen washer jets cowlings I think.

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Yes the RR versions use the Lima tooling, i think it is the same for the 37s & 47s too. 

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