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A trip to Middleport Pottery is well worth it if you are in the area (there's a good cafe there also).

 

My wife used to sell some of her artwork there so we had quite a few visits, it a great place to wander round and soak up the industrial ambience (not atmosphere, that would have been rather unpleasant).

 

I did plan a small shunting layout based on the building and canal arrangement at Middleport but realised the buildings would make it quite a time consuming build.

Edited by Argos
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I know next to nothing about the NSR, but have always admired the station building at Stone, which is quite magnificent.

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The building at Sandon is rather fine too, with its porte-cochère - all in the same characteristic Jacobean style. It was the subject of a very fine 4 mm scale model that adorned, rather incongruously, a layout set in Gloucestershire (Midland I think) that was on the exhibition circuit some yeas ago (probably last century). Was in MRJ I think.

Edited by Compound2632
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By rights, Sandon doesn’t really deserve that port cochere, the village is too small and remote. I associate them with places like Marylebone. It seems there was an Earl had his country estate nearby, and it was put in for his convenience.

Stone is different, the way it’s placed across the vee where the two lines split, and a magnificent Jacobean style. On the model I showed there’s an advert for Joules Ales on the end of a building, and their brewery is /was at Stone. Joule was a physicist who gives his name to some unit of heat (?) but I’m glad to say he did turn his creative talent into brewing as well.

A4414794-0037-4AFA-BCE5-53E4B680822E.jpeg.dce3f3bf469914a50b1b0c2efd5deff1.jpeg

Edited by Northroader
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Just to add to that, Sandon in a somewhat neglected condition in BR days (down, Annie) and a CHE painting of Stone, with NSR train to Stafford in front, and a LNWR train tucked behind.

E4EE5B73-31C9-446E-90A0-EC1E155125C8.jpeg.ebb5321f59d91c1b7507a68e0d619d76.jpeg1DA15329-A119-42B3-A8C9-467798E8AC7F.jpeg.c9c25d4d8970e297522e94fd397693ad.jpeg

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Mr Joule’s unit is used to register energy, rather than heat.

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1 hour ago, Nearholmer said:

Mr Joule’s unit is used to register energy, rather than heat.

Heat is energy: not to be confused with temperature, which is possibly what you mean by “heat” here (as this is the everyday use of the term).


Scientifically, heat refers to energy in transfer, and is in fact measured in Joules. 

 

The difference is easiest explained by two lumps of the same metal, one twice as big as the other. Whilst they may be at the same temperature, the larger one contains more energy.
 

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The joule is the unit of energy in the International System of Units (SI). It is a derived unit, in other words, it is not directly defined but can be expressed in terms of the base units kilogram, metre, and second: J = kg m^2 s^−2*. It is thus also the unit of work, and the unit of heat.

 

Note that, as for all units named after persons, the name of the unit is not capitalised but the unit symbol is.

 

*As far as I've worked out, the text editor in the current version of RMWeb doesn't support superscripts etc., neither does it support pasting such formatting in from elsewhere. I have therefore used the notation ^ to indicate a superscript.

Edited by Compound2632
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Yes, I was clumsily attempting to make the point that J signifies any form of energy, not  only heat energy.

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5 hours ago, Northroader said:

Just to add to that, Sandon in a somewhat neglected condition in BR days (down, Annie) and a CHE painting of Stone, with NSR train to Stafford in front, and a LNWR train tucked behind.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/E4EE5B73-31C9-446E-90A0-EC1E155125C8.jpeg.ebb5321f59d91c1b7507a68e0d619d76.jpeghttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1DA15329-A119-42B3-A8C9-467798E8AC7F.jpeg.c9c25d4d8970e297522e94fd397693ad.jpeg

Vandals!  How could they leave such a lovely building to rot.  Grrrrrrrr :angry:

 

And I note that yet again gettyimages is attempting to expensively sell the rights to images that can be found for nothing in the public domain.  I wonder how many people get taken in by their fraudulent claims to their ownership of images..

 

BkXbISR.jpg

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You’ll be glad to hear that it’s been done up as a private residence now, although as it’s right on top of a 24/7 main line, they’ll need sound proofing. I like the way your technical expertise can lose that Getty overprint. Can I call round and you show me how to do that, as I’ve just realised you’re only living five miles away?

A4AAAB6E-E679-4446-9E29-BE501EE2CC7E.jpeg.b329ef88c45977bc74d1b9c83f66d343.jpeg

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Look on any packet of food and it will tell you how many joules it contains which could be used to keep you warm, run upstairs or saw up wood for your baseboards. Unfortunately those that don't get used seem to become fat.

 

Don

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3 hours ago, Northroader said:

You’ll be glad to hear that it’s been done up as a private residence now, although as it’s right on top of a 24/7 main line, they’ll need sound proofing. I like the way your technical expertise can lose that Getty overprint. Can I call round and you show me how to do that, as I’ve just realised you’re only living five miles away?

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/A4AAAB6E-E679-4446-9E29-BE501EE2CC7E.jpeg.b329ef88c45977bc74d1b9c83f66d343.jpeg

Interesting.  Does that mean I could move over to the old mother country and live there because I'm a New Zealand citizen?

 

It's good that Sandon station building is now getting some love.  Far too many beautiful old stations buildings were left to rot in the aftermath of the demon Beeching's foul works.

 

And I did really find that old Hamilton-Ellis print completely free of gettyimages overprint on the interwebs.  I always check to see if any of their Uk railway images they claim title to are freely available elsewhere and in most cases they are.

Edited by Annie
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13 minutes ago, Annie said:

Far too many beautiful old stations buildings were left to rot in the aftermath of the demon Beeching's foul works.

 

 

Some were sold off at a very reasonable price to the incumbent station master, if they were the live-in sort and if he was close to retirement anyway. I have no idea what proportion of redundant station buildings were disposed of in this way.

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30 minutes ago, Annie said:

Interesting.  Does that mean I could move over to the old mother country and live there because I'm a New Zealand citizen?

It’s not very big, but as it’s between Catcombe and Goatacre you could bring a pet.

97B40DCA-CE07-4E01-8B22-8CBF555609D3.jpeg.713d582c7b1aabb2b78c4b06f4ac5e0a.jpeg

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  Thousands of railway houses were sold-off to staff during the sixties and seventies - I remover there being a sort of weekly notice of sales and lettings to staff even as recently as c1980, and I looked at a few when I was a junior engineer, because they were keenly priced and often had very interesting history. Trouble was that they had all suffered years of neglect and needed a fortune spent on them.
 

One I got very tempted by was a LBSCR house at Arundel, but the flashings around the chimneys had been allowed to “go”, allowing water to run down the internal walls and rot the roof timbers, and the timbers of both floors ....... it needed every timber in it to be replaced, which was beyond my means.

 

i went for a completely brand new house instead, and ironically had problems with rot in exterior woodwork after <3 years, which the builders had to put right on about ten houses in the street!

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19 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

Some were sold off at a very reasonable price to the incumbent station master, if they were the live-in sort and if he was close to retirement anyway. I have no idea what proportion of redundant station buildings were disposed of in this way.

I doubt if many were, a lot of places seem to have station / goods yard sold as a package, rather than just split the main building off. With the Beeching plan I get the idea that Whitehall had a policy with any closures to sell off any blocks of land across the right of way to make it difficult as possible to reopen the line. Certainly when Swindon works finally closed, there was some uncertainty about wether it might still be needed, but all the main line connections and signalling were whipped out straight away which made any financial case that much harder.

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5 minutes ago, Northroader said:

I doubt if many were, a lot of places seem to have station / goods yard sold as a package, rather than just split the main building off. With the Beeching plan I get the idea that Whitehall had a policy with any closures to sell off any blocks of land across the right of way to make it difficult as possible to reopen the line. Certainly when Swindon works finally closed, there was some uncertainty about wether it might still be needed, but all the main line connections and signalling were whipped out straight away which made any financial case that much harder.

There certainly seems to have been a very deliberate attempt made to permanently kill off as many railways as possible.  A particular case in point was the former GER line Hunstanton which had a  healthy passenger traffic and was paying its way and was closed despite considerable local opposition.

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On 11/11/2019 at 01:30, Northroader said:

Being lazy, I’m just sticking a link in, he regarded himself as a brewer, and the rest such as inventing heat and energy was just a hobby. Quite a lad.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Prescott_Joule

Joule demonstrated the equivalence of heat and work, which is why the SI unit of energy was named for him.

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12 minutes ago, St Enodoc said:

Joule demonstrated the equivalence of heat and work, which is why the SI unit of energy was named for him.

I like the way he was on honeymoon in Switzerland, and he accidentally met up with a great rival to his studies, so the two of them were trying to measure the gain in heat top to bottom from  a famous scenic waterfall. Bet his bride was impressed by that?

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 Continuing a look at Knotty territory matters, a walk on down the canal towpath from Middleport pottery brings you to the Etruscan Bone and Flint Mill, another of Angus’s involved buildings. Happily now preserved, with occasional demonstrations. Here it’s the subject of a painting by my favourite artist, Rowland Hilder. Just occasionally he left Kent and went slumming, here for a Shell calendar series.80290393-B1A3-419B-A63E-6344D55B7692.jpeg.08b51be7ca35bb1ce1d75007897ffab0.jpeg

The large square chimney is in fact a calcining kiln, where either flint or bone was heated up to very high temperatures losing moisture and altering the character of the material, then being crushed to a fine powder in wet pans, the rollers being steam driven in this case. If powdered flint was added to clay and made into pottery, you got stoneware, a strong opaque ceramic, and and powdered bone to clay gave you bone china, a fine translucent ware. Why Etruscan? Well, back in the mid 1700s, archaeologists were in full flow in the Ancient classical sites of Greece, Etruria, and Rome, and their discoveries became most fashionable and copied, with the Stoke on Trent potters trying hard to capture the styles and material, together with the imports coming from China. Probably the best known was Josiah Wedgwood, the eleventh child of a pottery family (eleven kids-Mamma  Mia!) with a physical disability he became more involved in design than potting, following the fashions of the day. From there he went to introducing large scale production methods and new pottery techniques. He was one of the main driving forces to get the Trent and Mersey canal built. His goods needed to be sold, and he went on, rather surprisingly, to pioneer most of the sales techniques used up to nowadays, when “on-line” methods are supplanting them, so another Potteries figure with an intellect to match Joule.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josiah_Wedgwood

My sister used to live at Stoke in the late fifties, and you became aware that the big names for high quality pottery were Wedgwood, Mintons, and Spode. It’s worthwhile doing an enquiry on the web for these names to appreciate the ceramic design and art in use from then on into the Victorian era. Anyhow, Wedgwood had a new factory built at a place he called Etruria, just north of Stoke proper, also a large mansion, Etruria Hall. With the Industrial Revolution and population rise and prosperity, the pottery industries boomed, such as the Mill we  were looking at. All were producing smoke from hundreds of kilns fired by local coal, and I’m afraid Stoke became one of the blackest, smokiest places in Britain. Next to Etruria there was Shelton with a large ironworks adding to the blackness. Here’s an old engraving of the place with a tasty selection of the local private owner wagons, but, shock, horror, not one wagon of a certain diagram from a certain railway.

40F9A40F-E4E5-426F-82CB-6BF1C15BC9BD.jpeg.5d3e3ccb6733edecbcaaf84abae1d390.jpeg

In the end, Wedgwoods moved out of town to a greenfield site at Barlaston, alongside the Knotty main line where the workers could travel out of the centre to the new works. The new kilns were electric, and the jasper ware produced was a pale blue, rather than the dark blue from a coal kiln. I bought some, probably very passé these days, but I’m quite fond of it.

B12DA0CF-CC73-4D9F-ABAA-0290EA81081C.jpeg.11b50a9029728dad0246974c027ba95c.jpeg

 

 

Edited by Northroader
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1 hour ago, Northroader said:

I’m afraid Stoke became one of the blackest, smokiest places in Britain.

Another place which would have been in the same league is Coatbridge, 'The Iron Borough'!

 

1147251595_Image(26).jpg.451cea1097f304519787964146ed776b.jpg

 

Jim 

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Rather like Ironbridge/Coalbrookdale with the famous painting of the Bedlam Furnace by P J Loutherberg

 

Don 

 

 

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