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It's worth watching eBay for used Peco track. I've bought some not perfect, but perfectly usable, track and points, and some that's as good as new, for a fair bit less than the new price. Most of what's available is code 100, which in my opinion could spoil the look of what you've done so far, especially on a minor line, but there is code 75 around too, and I've bought some of it. You can hide the rough bits, as well as the appalling sleepers, by ballasting over the sleepers, an advantage of modelling the 19th or early 20th century.

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These K's kits are MR three plank opens, as per the later Slaters kit. The good thing is that the MR actively sold off old wagon and coaching stock to the smaller pre-group railways, so having some ex-MR stock on your line is actually very authentic.

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Good luck with this venture, you're off to a flyer with the row of cottages. Watching this one with great interest.

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Have followed your buildings construction & will  follow the layout construction with interest.  And hopefully more building projects to come. 

 

Regards, Daisy.

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A couple of shots of Castle Acre showing the area that 'inspired' the cottage backs and gateway:

post-25673-0-98565100-1454313631_thumb.jpg

post-25673-0-34240800-1454313653_thumb.jpg

Edited by Edwardian
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Will watch with interest ........ Might even drag the family to Norfolk again, on the strength of this.

 

K

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Ah the delightful Castle Acre, just up the road from me. I cant wait to see the layout unfold, especially to the standard that the buildings are being built to! Good luck!!

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Well then, Ian, they'll be no fooling you if I get any of the details wrong!

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This is where I ask for your kind assistance.  Normally I find myself with a strong mental image of what something should look like.  Of course, it may well be beyond my abilities to achieve, but I know what it should look like.

 

I had a strong mental picture of a shop and how it should look.  I also quickly arrived at a firm view as to the name of its proprietor.  What I have no sense of at all is what it should be selling!

 

So, here below is the start I have made on the shop.  It's the Edwardian period in a fair sized village, i.e. one that sustains several shops, but probably nothing non-essential. So, what is this fine fellow a purveyor of?  Be he butcher, baker or candlestick maker?

 

It has the look of a very fine bookshop to me!

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With a name like that, he must be a purveyor of fine model railways to the local well to do. You could have a model of your village in the window, which of course will need a model of JH Ahern's shop displaying a model of the village in the window, with a model of JH Ahern's shop with.......... :jester:

Edited by BG John
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My first thought was an undertaker - but no side entrance for the hearse so that was ruled out.  I therefore reckon a nice straightforward everyday grocer's or baker's shop.

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What about a pharmacist?

 

This started with thoughts of madder, which led to dyestuffs in general, aniline (sp?) dyes, chemistry, and thereby pharmacist.

 

Which, in turn, leads to that well known Norfolk folk song:

 

"The sun had set behind the hill across the dreary moor,

When sickly and lame a boy there came up to a doctor's door.

Can you tell me where e'er there be one who can me assist

To cure my ills, prescribe me pills, and be a pharmacist,

And be a pharmacist ?"

 

Anyone able to name both the artists, and the album from which this comes, is clearly a person of deep good taste.

 

K

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If we are talking the Edwardian period, it could be a Photographer's studio - remembering that was John Ahern's profession.

 

Regards

Chris H

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Chris

 

I was about to add the photographer suggestion myself, a pharmacist/photographer being a common combination in small towns. You could have his mobile studio caravan parked outside, being loaded.

 

[edit: lots about a typical photographic business of the period, with pictures of their kit, here: http://tbmod.com/rm/Madder%20Valley%20MRJ%201994%20dec.pdf . My father used a lot of work from this firm in local history books that he wrote.]

 

But, I thought Ahern was a lawyer by profession,mand a photographer by hobby ...... Am I getting mixed-up with someone else? [ Edit: He was an insurance broker ...... The excellent MRJ survey of his contribution to RM is on-line here http://tbmod.com/rm/Madder%20Valley%20MRJ%201994%20dec.pdf ]

Kevin

Edited by Nearholmer
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Shop in a mid size deep Norfolk village would push me towards a butcher, hardware or general store.

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Deepest Norfolk ?

 

Mountaineering equipment suppliers.

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Taxidermist?

 

No, didn't think so... Some great suggestions, thanks, already much to ponder on.

post-25673-0-90182000-1454500636.jpg

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Deepest Norfolk ?

Mountaineering equipment suppliers.

There a mountain warehouse shop in Holt!

 

This looks an excellent project, I love the flint buildings which having built some myself are no mean feat. You have built an entire village

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