Jump to content

Recommended Posts

31 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

More on-topic, we are on the long drive home from a day at the West Norfolk seaside, which was looking very fine today.

 

 

706CA417-2E67-4A49-B788-D810DED562F6.jpeg

2F022E20-4E38-4281-9188-E0E1C45B6397.jpeg

Just south of sunny hunny? 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, TheQ said:

Just south of sunny hunny? 

That's a bit over familiar, dearie.

  • Funny 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Malcolm 0-6-0 said:

Speaking of narrow gauge - has there ever been an OO model of the narrowest of all -

 

OO? No.

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Annie said:

I have the 'A' frames for the track in 1/16 scale in my tiny Shapeways shop.

 

https://www.shapeways.com/shops/annie-s-lartigue-monorail-shop

 

This was a project I was working on when I got ill with narcolepsy.  I've never sold any and it's something I've long ago consigned to the 'complete waste of time' basket.

 

Stop trying to tempt me with new projects I  have quite enough.  1/16th would be a grand scale gauge 1 track 1 3/4 ins pretty close for Tal y Llyn. Garden railways have largely settled for 1/19 and 7/8ths plus G scale which is a sort of anything you want it to be scale around 1:22.5 not especially convenient scales.

 

Don

 

PS rmWEB offline tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Malcolm 0-6-0 said:

 

 

Midsomer Brevis isn't that the motto of Midsomer where three murders per visit are mandatory? :jester:

 

At least Father Brown has a real railway handy!

   Brian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That really is rather charming and delightful James. 

  • Like 1
  • Agree 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

50 minutes ago, Donw said:

Stop trying to tempt me with new projects I  have quite enough. 

1/16th is a nice scale to work in Don.  At that size things can be constructed in much the same way as the prototype which is really good when it comes to making buildings.  Small narrow gauge lines with small and interesting rolling stock is where 1/16th scale really shines.

 

Once I developed narcolepsy though I threw it all into some boxes and I haven't looked at since.

  • Friendly/supportive 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

Some further progress on the OO9 station ...

Now that is lovely James.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, NeilHB said:

That really is rather charming and delightful James. 

 

26 minutes ago, Annie said:

Now that is lovely James.

 

Thank you both.

 

The plan was to print out this HO Rural or Small Town Dépôt kit in 4mm scale and Anglicise. This, I reasoned, could look like some cheaply done but orné 1890s Light Railway structure, drawing on the Swiss Chalet style that cropped up here, France and in the US as previously discussed, with that mix of Tudor and classical influences one sees in a 'Queen Anne' revival style.  

 

My thoughts were:

 

- Give the building a masonry base (here Smart Models brick)

 

- Replace the clapboard with render (here Scalescenes stucco)

 

- Instead of having a separate, lower, roof, have a single roof (like e.g. Lynton station, albeit with the overhang at a different, shallower, pitch). 

 

- Replace the diamond tiles.  Although occasionally seen in England, e.g.Tetbury, they would not be as typically English as small clay tiles (here Scalescenes).

 

- Lose the goods shed end (a separate small lock-up would better represent UK practice).

 

Things did not go exactly to plan, however.  I almost never do mock-ups, but here I printed the kit enlarged to 4mm scale in greyscale to get an impression of how it would look.  Even shorn of the goods section it was too large. 

 

So, I decided that I would print the kit to the original HO size, but with the doors printed to 4mm scale and the 4mm scale masonry plinth adding height. 

 

What we need now are two tall brick chimneys.

  • Like 5
  • Craftsmanship/clever 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, brack said:

Im often tempted to try a brennan monorail in 7mm. I know it's been done in 1:22, I rather suspect the physics gets quite a lot harder as you go down scales.

What, gyroscopes and all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

More on-topic, we are on the long drive home from a day at the West Norfolk seaside, which was looking very fine today.

 

 

706CA417-2E67-4A49-B788-D810DED562F6.jpeg

2F022E20-4E38-4281-9188-E0E1C45B6397.jpeg

Very flat, Norfolk.

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really flat at all.... Even the Fens go up and down, but as you head away from the fens it is really quite rolling....

 

Andy G

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Annie said:

 

1/16th is a nice scale to work in Don.  At that size things can be constructed in much the same way as the prototype which is really good when it comes to making buildings.  Small narrow gauge lines with small and interesting rolling stock is where 1/16th scale really shines.

 

Once I developed narcolepsy though I threw it all into some boxes and I haven't looked at since.

 

I suppose knives are a problem. How about scissors cut out parts from card then treat with shellac simply glue the dried parts together some small bits of stripwood sawn with a small razor saw nothing too dangerous there. Is that feasible? I dont wish to pry I would imagine it is whether you have any warning or not. You have my sympathy it must be frustrating.

Don

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, uax6 said:

Not really flat at all..

.. Even the Fens go up and down, but as you head away from the fens it is really quite rolling....

 

Andy G

 

The halt at Kelling Heath on the Poppy line is so steep that trains only stop on the way down

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, St Enodoc said:

Very flat, Norfolk.

 

Castle Rising football pitch and Narborough cricket fields had slopes to match anything that I played on in the West Riding!

 

Ian T

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, uax6 said:

Not really flat at all.... Even the Fens go up and down, but as you head away from the fens it is really quite rolling....

 

Andy G

 

1 hour ago, Donw said:

 

The halt at Kelling Heath on the Poppy line is so steep that trains only stop on the way down

 

39 minutes ago, ianathompson said:

 

Castle Rising football pitch and Narborough cricket fields had slopes to match anything that I played on in the West Riding!

 

Ian T

Don't blame me, blame Noel Coward!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Annie said:

Knives were definitely out Don.  I was a bit so-so about scissors, but razor saws were a lot safer.  After injuring my hands a few times and spilling things I gave up in frustration, but back then I didn't really understand what was going on with me.  I do now though and I'm much more aware of warning signs that I'm likely to drop into a sleep state.

I worked a lot in wood and for that I found a razor saw to be my most useful tool.  I used to cut wooden parts for models from offcuts of wood that had been given to me for kindling for our wood stove and I have a couple of goods wagons that were made this way for the larger timbers with the rest of the planking provided by coffee stirrers and lolly sticks from the local craft shop.

 

I don't want to hi-jack James's thread, but this is a project that I would like to finish.  I know it's unashamedly whimsical, but I had a lot of fun getting it to this stage before I stopped model making.

 

586g0Sj.jpg

 

That is so full of charisma.

 

What;s the project?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Very flat, Norfolk.

I think the sea is generally flat, or at least curved at such a large radius that it seems flat, everywhere, isn't it?

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

 

That is so full of charisma.

 

What;s the project?

 

I was going to build a small line in 1/16th scale featuring the signal box and a small station with a passing loop James.  Being 1/16th scale it wouldn't have been all that small in the amount of ground covered as compared with other scales, but I wasn't worried about that.  I still have the template pieces I made for the station building and the beginnings of a tram engine that owes a lot to Wantage Tramway No.4 in its general design.

It's lucky that these items have survived since I became very depressed after developing narcolepsy and I threw away a lot of things.  What I will be doing though is finding everything that I still have for this project and putting it in a safe place since it would be nice if I could continue with it.

  • Friendly/supportive 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Norfolk were flat, all the rivers would overflow and we'd be living on marshland..

  • Informative/Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure that rivers could exist in a perfectly flat world; wouldn't rain just create a sort of infinite shallow puddle, and slowly soak in?

 

I think St Enodoc was teasing, but the seaside excursion was good cover for a quick passing re-survey of the territory for the Wolfringham Branch and the WM Mineral Railway, which makes the point that the coast along there is actually all former bog and saltmarsh, under a quite steep original "edge" at the Sandringham-Dersingham Ridge. I can see why HMQ's ancestors chose it for their residence, because themix if flat bits and low hills, and the mix of soil-types makes it very picturesque.

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, TheQ said:

If Norfolk were flat, all the rivers would overflow and we'd be living on marshland..

 

and it would be called The Broads.

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I always took the Coward quip to refer to the Broads; if you think about it, a lot of tourist traffic from outside the county was directed to the Broads, so that might have informed the erroneous view that Norfolk is a flat county.

 

The Fens are really a thing of North Cambridgeshire and Lincolnshire. 

 

One of the attractions of flat-landscape modelling is the challenge it represents. My theory is that, provided one goes for a Ricean height, his view-blocking techniques should work well in a landscape where the highest anyone generally gets is the first floor of a building. 

 

Likewise, a 3D back-scene formed of a series of receding flats, representing successive distant fields ought to work. Alternatively, a mature hedge row is generally enough to mark the edge of the world. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.