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I had thought of that, but nobody would get it! 

 

It's also home for me; I have far too much useless old tat that nobody modern and sensible would care about.

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29 minutes ago, sem34090 said:

I took a few more last night; The university photographic society is running a competition with the theme of "Home". With each shot I think I get further from that theme... I suppose they might count if one can claim "Home Front" to be valid. Need to decide which one to enter.

1163507205_IMG_20201025_001111_3092.jpg.48115ee9f8d951526c38adadd0a5809d.jpg

 

IMG_20201025_011806_569.jpg.c4e51035ead2c9fb15a086c301f77a85.jpg

 

IMG_20201025_013330_447.jpg.af006a1f6211d962cd75e534f5704535.jpg

 

IMG_20201025_013521_488.jpg.f78cfd4a93566824cb5d30608170e402.jpg

 

IMG_20201025_013655_209.jpg.f7fc8716401e2e6eac664711ae963718.jpg

 

IMG_20201025_014236_685.jpg.0434320c57d343f6a1dcf4d94f2bdb21.jpg

I'm not sure about this last one. I like to think there's a story behind it, but despite a sort of general impression of espionage I'm not sure what that is. Besides, in a university environment I expect even possessing anything with that symbol on it is enough to get me publicly shamed. At any rate it's not exactly relevant to the theme. As it happens, the symbol shown is on the cover of the 1978 edition of Shirer's The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich.

 

Superb pictures, Sem, though I suspect the last is to court unnecessary controversy.

 

Real period feel.  You evidently live in a museum, or, perhaps, like me, simply in the past!

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I think the last is the least likely to be entered; I liked the idea of a narrative there but as you say it's unnecessarily controversial.

 

It's hard to tell which sometimes, but I'd venture "museum" rather than "past" as my views on various things are perhaps rather more modern than the prevailing ones during the periods represented (Although the one with the P isn't meant to be a period shot).

 

As I said, though, I think the real answer is that I own an awful lot of tat!

 

Oh, and both cameras shown in the photos have film in them. Not sure how easy it is to get 9.5mm Cine developed these days, mind... Let alone buy new film. The sealed film is marked "Not to be developed later than Jan 31 1930" so probably best not to un-seal it. It may be usable, but there's something nice about something that has survived so many years unopened.

Edited by sem34090
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Interesting, very interesting.

 

When I was in my late teens I was also into photography, and set up a very similar series of shots, using material from the 30s, 40s and early 50s, and you may know that my taste for the aesthetic of those years has not departed.

 

Personally, I would steer well clear of even flirting with Nazi symbolism though - I have no idea what it means to you personally, but it's what it means to other people that is important in the context of something that is to become public. If the theme is "home", then "heimat" means a lot more in German than just the place where you grew-up, and has very dark connotations in connection with that symbol.

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This has all been occurring to me since I took it... As I say I was going for something relating to espionage (Hence why everything else in the shot is British) but you're quite right.

 

Currently seeing if I can go for "BR Goods Office".

321100703_IMG_20201025_112632_6953.jpg.13666ce5f7fdec674ba1bff9996d188a.jpg

And in B&W;

1159297825_IMG_20201025_112632_6955.jpg.dfec099c2b075e02f6f55dfede782fcc.jpg

If anyone can suggest how they fit the theme of "Home"...

 

Edited by sem34090
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21 hours ago, Edwardian said:

 

I'll try to do better when the sun returns to the North!

 

Excuse me! We've been having some magnificent dawns recently.

(Although perhaps I'm a little further North than you!)

 

Post_04.jpg.0e9f4ec9595d64c69829d9b05b040690.jpg

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7 hours ago, sem34090 said:

This has all been occurring to me since I took it... As I say I was going for something relating to espionage (Hence why everything else in the shot is British) but you're quite right.

 

Currently seeing if I can go for "BR Goods Office".

321100703_IMG_20201025_112632_6953.jpg.13666ce5f7fdec674ba1bff9996d188a.jpg

And in B&W;

1159297825_IMG_20201025_112632_6955.jpg.dfec099c2b075e02f6f55dfede782fcc.jpg

If anyone can suggest how they fit the theme of "Home"...

 

 

"What's that?  You're calling from the casting department about a remake of Oh, Mr Porter?"

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You're the third person to say that today! I never thought of myself as a Graham Moffatt lookalike, but it seems there must be something in that...

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2 hours ago, Edwardian said:

"dawn"?

 

Sorry, you'll have to explain what that is.

 

Someone tried to describe the experience but it appears you have to get up early which lets me out!-_-

       Brian.

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The point is surely that in the winter you don't have to get up early to see the dawn, in fact it takes a lie-in to miss it.

 

And, can anyone tell me why, very often in winter the sun rises all nice and red and bright and promising, only to instantly disappear into a dark-admiralty-grey cloud sheet that then covers the sky for the entire day, until the sun dips below it in the distant west for about half a millisecond as it sets? If I believed in deities, I might imagine that they deliberately tease us by having the sun wink at us twice a day.

 

But, thankfully we don't seem to have got to that bit of winter yet. We are having the torrential downpours part of Autumn currently.

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34 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

The point is surely that in the winter you don't have to get up early to see the dawn, in fact it takes a lie-in to miss it.

 

And, can anyone tell me why, very often in winter the sun rises all nice and red and bright and promising, only to instantly disappear into a dark-admiralty-grey cloud sheet that then covers the sky for the entire day, until the sun dips below it in the distant west for about half a millisecond as it sets? If I believed in deities, I might imagine that they deliberately tease us by having the sun wink at us twice a day.

 

But, thankfully we don't seem to have got to that bit of winter yet. We are having the torrential downpours part of Autumn currently.

Red sky in morning sheperds warning   etc

 

Nick B

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1 hour ago, Nearholmer said:

The point is surely that in the winter you don't have to get up early to see the dawn, in fact it takes a lie-in to miss it.

 

And, can anyone tell me why, very often in winter the sun rises all nice and red and bright and promising, only to instantly disappear into a dark-admiralty-grey cloud sheet that then covers the sky for the entire day, until the sun dips below it in the distant west for about half a millisecond as it sets? If I believed in deities, I might imagine that they deliberately tease us by having the sun wink at us twice a day.

 

But, thankfully we don't seem to have got to that bit of winter yet. We are having the torrential downpours part of Autumn currently.

Difficult without providing a picture, so, taking a deep breath.....  are you good at mental pictures?

 

The Earth's atmosphere tends to be of similar, rather thin, depth around the World. 

The same atmosphere contains various amounts of dust and other pollutants.

If you are fortunate enough to look at the Sun when it passes vertically overhead, then there will only be that thin layer between you and the Sun.  Minimum amount of pollutants to pass through, en route to you.

At Dawn and Dusk the Sun is viewed more tangentially, so has to pass through a vastly increased distance through the atmosphere, so much increased amount of pollutants to pass through.

 

Those particles in the atmosphere diffuse the light.  The further the light passes through the atmosphere, the more the light gets defused {spread} and the greater the visual effect. {Dawn / Dusk}

Some colours get deflected more than others.

Sun overhead, full bright white light, Sun on the horizon, blue light spreads more than the red/orange, so red/orange then becomes more predominant and so more visible -  {Big Harvest Moon}

 

My brain hurts and awaits the pedants.....

 

Julian

 

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8 hours ago, Edwardian said:

"dawn"?

 

Sorry, you'll have to explain what that is.

 

Delightful girl, rosy-fingered, something of a goer: Eos / Aurora, daughter of Hyperion and Theia, mother of the winds. Sister to Helios / Apollo, god of the sun and Selene / Luna, goddess of the moon. I knew a girl called Dawn Moon. She married a chap called Hamilton as soon as possible. He was in the navy so she was thenceforward known as Emma.

Edited by Compound2632
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Jcredfer

 

That explains why the sun appears red/orange when low in the sky.

 

It doesn’t explain why it often appears at the edge of cloud sheet at dawn and dusk.

 

K

 

 

Edited by Nearholmer
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15 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

Jcredfer

 

That explains why the sun appears red/orange when low in the sky.

 

It doesn’t explain why it often appears at the edge of cloud sheet at dawn and dusk.

 

K

 

 

Is it just because the rays are shining horizontally (or rather tangentially) so can sneak underneath the clouds?

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Yes. But, why do the cloud sheets so often have their edges at positions that permit this?

 

(The truth is, I think, that they probably don’t often. It is more likely that on those odd occasions when they do it produces a memorable winking sunrise/set, rather than a forgettably grey slow increase/decrease in light level.)

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11 hours ago, jcredfer said:

Some colours get deflected more than others.

Yes. Shorter wavelengths get scattered more easily, which is the blue end of the spectrum, which is why the sky is blue.

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38 minutes ago, Northroader said:

What I don’t understand is why the dawn comes up like thunder on the road to Mandalay?

In fact no-one does. The main reason for this is that if you were looking from the road to Mandalay across some kind of Bay you would be looking West towards the Bay of Bengal and the line should read "The night comes down like thunder over India cross the bay, which wouldn't scan unless you used the Imperial pronuciation of InJa rather than In-Di-A and would have little poetic value. Such is life.

Edited by webbcompound
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4 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

I had always assumed that colonial mariners used the term “road” in much the way that railwaymen do, to mean “route”. 

 

That was my thinking too. Also "road" in the sense of an anchorage, though I think that's usually in the plural.

Edited by Compound2632
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