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41 minutes ago, webbcompound said:

however everything has to end and that includes Webbcompound


I sincerely hope that there is room for reconsideration in that statement.

 

Not knowing how isolated your isolation is, I can assure you of two things: even those who normally get along splendidly can rub one another up the wrong way given too much time together under the pressured circumstance of “isolation”; and, if company is annoying, the complete absence of it is much worse.

 

 

 

 

 

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EM gauge has been a subject that has cropped up in recent postings on this forum, but does anybody else remember EEM gauge?. I recall many years ago reading an article in a model railway magazine from either the late 1950's or early 1960's about a group of railway modellers in 4mm/ft scale, that wished to work to a more exacting standard as far as gauge went, than even EM. The EEM gauge was a reference to 18.8mm gauge. This was before the Protofour Society was formed.

 

As I no longer possess the magazine the article was published in, and google does not appear to be my friend, in regards to providing the relevant information, maybe it is all just a product of my imagination.

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39 minutes ago, rocor said:

EM gauge has been a subject that has cropped up in recent postings on this forum, but does anybody else remember EEM gauge?. I recall many years ago reading an article in a model railway magazine from either the late 1950's or early 1960's about a group of railway modellers in 4mm/ft scale, that wished to work to a more exacting standard as far as gauge went, than even EM. The EEM gauge was a reference to 18.8mm gauge. This was before the Protofour Society was formed.

From Scalefour Soc:

 

In the early 1960's a group of modellers formed, interested in creating more accurate scale models than the then available commercial options. Initially calling themsleves the Model Standards Study Group, they became known as the Model Railway Study Group (MRSG) as they formalised their work. Comprising: J.S. Brook Smith, D.E. Jones, M.S. Cross, W.L. Kidston, B. Morgan and Dr. B. Weller, they acted to create new, more accurate, standards to build models to.

An initial proposal was called EEM, and then the Protofour and related 'Proto' standards were developed. Formalised by the MRSG, these were promoted in a pair of articles in Model Railway News, published in August and September 1966.

A further thirteen part series in Model Railway Constructor started the following year, and became a seminal introduction to their ideas and the Protofour and other Proto standards.

The group went on to form the Protofour Society, founded in 1969.

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Nice picture. I posted some more recent ones some time ago probably 600 or more pages back

 

not quite the moving finger having writ..... but one could lose a whole day searching CA for something.

Future historians will have afield day trawling through it.

Don

 

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9 hours ago, Schooner said:

Forgive me, I can't recall where the canon stands on subject Wells-next-the-Sea. Regardless, here's a rather fine wagon (or three) there in 1895. Sorry about all the clutter.

 

Interesting wagon behind the fisher-folk family - rounded end, but with a flat bit at each side, and dumb buffers. Of the two wagons further round the key, is the one on the right a D299? Or am I imagining the letters M R?

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4 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

Interesting wagon behind the fisher-folk family - rounded end, but with a flat bit at each side, and dumb buffers.

 

Yes, I spotted that and thought it almost looked French, although I think it is actually an English-style construction. 

 

Mind you, British builders did turn-out wagons on the French model for export . Somewhere, deep in a cupboard, I have a Majorcan Railways open in 15mm/ft scale that I built years ago. British-built to contemporary French style - the way the framing works is quite different from an English-style wagon, and they used planks at 45 degrees in the sides to add strength. Thinking about it, the style might actually be "Archaic English", dating back to the 1830/40s, and rooted in road cart design, from before the emergence of what we think of a typically English.

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10 hours ago, Schooner said:

Forgive me, I can't recall where the canon stands on subject Wells-next-the-Sea. Regardless, here's a rather fine wagon (or three) there in 1895. Sorry about all the clutter.

wells-the-quay-1895-from-round-the-coast

 

Hopefully of some interest. As per, open in new tab and zoom for full glory :)

 

Ah, the dear old Minstrel, often to be seen at Blakeney quay...

 

 

 

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That is a really interesting wagon, because it is half-way between the "French/Archaic-English" and the "Typical English" in its construction. 

 

The basic story seems to have been of iron components (knees, long washer-plates, corner reinforcements etc) supplanting structural timber, almost certainly allowing a more robust, lighter, and very slightly larger-capacity, wagon.

 

One tends to think of the typical four-wheeled open as bein stuck in the past, but it clearly had an even earlier past before the one it got stuck in.

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6 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

it clearly had an even earlier past before the one it got stuck in.

I've no idea why but that put me in mind of a joke by (I think) Les Dawson:

 

"When we got married I took her for better or worse but she turned out a lot worse than I took her for".

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1 hour ago, Northroader said:

Here’s a drawing, MRN 8/62, in S scale by popular request, so you’ve all got a nice little job to keep you occupied over the Christmas holidays, and not get into any “relationships” - yeuk!

 

Very tempting - though I'd do it as running c. 1902 with help from Basilica Fields. As to relationships, I'm well in and unlikely to be forming any new ones under the present conditions!

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1 hour ago, Annie said:

Colburn's original drawing can be found here  on page 174   https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015021736437&view=1up&seq=23

 

Unfortunately like many digitalised books not much care was taken to smooth most of the drawings out properly.

 

It appears that the original book is is still available in paper form.

 

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=30591120204&searchurl=an%3Dzerah%2Bcolburn%26sortby%3D20%26tn%3Dlocomotive%2Bengineering%2Band%2Bthe%2Bmechanism%2Bof%2Brailways&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-title1

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That is a digital copy from an original - a real copy of Colburn would cost a lot more than that, but you could probably get one via someone like the guy at Stamford.

 

I have only ever bought one of those digital copy jobs, via Blackwell's in Oxford no less, and it was utter rubbish, so poorly scanned that it was genuinely illegible. They sent a replacement, and that was rubbish too, so I got my money back, and then, eventually, found a high-quality scan on-line through an American library for free!

 

 

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1 hour ago, Nearholmer said:

That is a digital copy from an original - a real copy of Colburn would cost a lot more than that, but you could probably get one via someone like the guy at Stamford.

 

I have only ever bought one of those digital copy jobs, via Blackwell's in Oxford no less, and it was utter rubbish, so poorly scanned that it was genuinely illegible. They sent a replacement, and that was rubbish too, so I got my money back, and then, eventually, found a high-quality scan on-line through an American library for free!

 

 

A quick look around on the internet and I found prices for an original copy in tatty condition starting at £248 and heading skywards from there depending on condition, quality of binding etc.

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2 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

Yes, well, my mind went even blanker than usual, and I couldn’t recall his name.

An ever more frequent occurrence in my experience! :(

 

Jim

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20 hours ago, Annie said:

Colburn's original drawing can be found here  on page 174   https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015021736437&view=1up&seq=23

 

Unfortunately like many digitalised books not much care was taken to smooth most of the drawings out properly.

 

Is there not a problem also with binding?

One doesn't want to 'force flatten' a book if that would damage it.

 

Any printed works that I have where required drawings cover two pages gets handled carefully, with any measurements 'across a page' taken from quoted figures and then lined up with a reference point on the same side as the page.

 

Also, I am experiencing an increasing problem with my RCTS 'Green Books'. They live in my bedside-reading bookcase, and get taken care of. Even so, one or two of the most used volumes are showing some deterioration of the spines and binding.

 

(The essential reason for them being bedside books is that if afflicted with sleeplessness (an unfortunately increasing problem for me), a slow study of Gateshead/Darlington boiler types and the number of tubes/stay-tubes/flues is interesting without being exiting.)

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Are you talking about what I think is called "perfect" binding, which really means stuck together, and to a feeble spine, with a dollop of glue?

 

Not durable at all. To last, books need to be sewn together, and probably ideally printed on vellum, although that might be a bit OTT for the sort of material you mention.

 

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33 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

To last, books need to be sewn together, and probably ideally printed on vellum, although that might be a bit OTT for the sort of material you mention.

In the post armageddon world of "A Canticle for Liebowitz" technical knowledge is kept alive through the dark ages in monastries where surviving blueprints and circuit diagrams are carefully hand transcribed onto vellum, (with of course the addition of marginalia and illuminated capitals). Wait a few months and we might yet get there.

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