Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Glad to hear that alls turned out well, thanks to your vigilance and the skill and caring of the hospital staff.

 

We often hear when some things go wrong, and feel sorry for those affected but never the happy outcomes for those sucessfully treated.  Like you, my life intersected with the NHS last week when my father was rushed to hospital with a stroke.  The ambulance turned up within minutes of making the call and he was transferred to the acute stroke unit on arrival, where he was well looked after and discharged by the weekend.  He's now recovering at home.

 

So once again, best wishes to you and your family.  Onwards, eh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

positive thing to note is that the NHS is strengthening the vaccination programme. A new vaccine has already been introduced for 'pre-university', and another new one has been introduced for babies.

Edited by Nearholmer
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As 'Hroth' says... SER No.240...

401086.jpg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very glad to hear that the boy is on the mend James - sending best wishes to all of you and hope he makes a speedy recovery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just caught up with this, glad to hear the outcome and that your lad is mending. You know where we are if you need a cuppa in Darlo....

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly. And if you ever need someone to talk to the Crown pub here in Great Ellingham is very nice. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Very uplifting news James.

As you say: the 'laws' of chance play a life and death part. Not least having the good fortune to ejoy ready access to DMH - where many clinical staff will have had past experiences, enabling instant response to the symptoms.

 

Growing up in east and west Africa, our children (now all in their 50s) had regular exposure to sudden death among school classmates from bacterial, as well as hereditary (blood sickle cell disease), maladies, and still recall their clases all being taken off to view open coffins.

In Ghana I was thought to have gone down with bacterial meningitis (via indirect diagnosis by telephone to Accra!). I lost a term's teaching and it destroyed my confidence in myself for more than a year. Several decades later it was considered more likely to have been a reaction to Lariam - the controversial anti malarial drug.

 

Now.... just get L's attractive brochure on the P'boro house back on the web - and the WNR could be re-equiped with new rolling stock by Christmas.

dh

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent news James a great relief to all the family.

 

Don

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are now all back from the hospital.

 

I just want to go to bed now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You all probably need to put your feet up for the rest of the afternoon!

 

At least grab a cup of tea first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just caught up with this, glad to hear the outcome and that your lad is mending. You know where we are if you need a cuppa in Darlo....

 

Thanks.  I'd love to, and I am very conscious that I have models still to return to you.

 

In other news, another set of etches arrived.  This time the 3-Compartment GER 4-Wheel Brake Third, Peter K etches.  I realise that the style of etching will differ from the Eveleigh Creations set, but I hope I can blend them in, because it gives me a 4-coach set but with both a 2 and 3-Compt. Brake.

 

Well, that's the plan, anyhow.

post-25673-0-23660300-1532701039_thumb.jpg

post-25673-0-59591300-1532701172_thumb.jpg

  • Like 17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to hear the positive news. I know it will have been a very stressful, trying and worrying time but hopefully everything is on the mend now. Thoughts remain with you and your family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stumbled across this whilst searching for something completely different. Perhaps the WNR needs a bespoke inspection vehicle

 

http://haylingbillyheritage.org/engines/sharp-stewart/rare-photograph-1-of-481-inspector-ex-499-hayling-island/

 

Has crossed my mind!  You could hack one of those little Sharp Stewarts out of a RTR Terrier, as the tanks extend forward far enough on the Brighton examples to accommodate the motor on the Dapol/Hornby version.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm seriously worried that the occupants would be crushed the moment this contraption buffered up to any other item of rolling stock. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm seriously worried that the occupants would be crushed the moment this contraption buffered up to any other item of rolling stock. 

If the loco briskly buffered up to anything at the front, as an occupant of the inspectors saloon I'd be worried about stray lumps of coal coming through the roof!

 

I see it only lasted 9 years!

 

Perhaps something like this would be more in keeping with the ethos of Castle Aching?

 

post-21933-0-92962200-1533043992.jpg

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The technology for getting a sail-powered vehicle under a restricted-clearance overbridge was certainly available at the other end of the county.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The technology for getting a sail-powered vehicle under a restricted-clearance overbridge was certainly available at the other end of the county.

Wherry good.....   :jester:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see it only lasted 9 years!

 

Perhaps it was the high mortality rate of the inspectors that caused its withdrawal.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

Glad to hear that your son is 'on the  mend'.

 

The Inspection saloon was a vehicle in regular use on several railways , one of the larger ones for was for was for Mr Webb, of the L&NWR, 

 

Here is a link to a photo  of the style of vehicle  https://hattonsimages.blob.core.windows.net/products/KB315_3198374_Qty1_3.jpg This is a large one, smaller ones are on e-ay on the web,, try 'LNWR inspection saloon', there were several designs

 

The Caledonian Railway used a redundant ( ex WCJS) 6 wheeler that was rebuilt for the same sort of purpose, .

 

A side view is on the caledonian Railway society web pages athttps://www.crassoc.org.uk/forum/download/file.php?id=2412&sid=c9c13abaa8e93f348140618d5813c37f

 

When more space was needed (extra persons involved) the large Family saloon vehicles were used.

 

Peter. 

Edited by PeterR
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.