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6 hours ago, Andy Hayter said:

 

And I think Cologne comes from French re-spelling, which the English adopted.  

 

 

Well the name is derived from the Latin name Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium because it was founded as a Roman colony. So in practical terms you have a colony named Colony. 

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9 hours ago, drmditch said:

... why do the English insist on re-spelling other peoples place names? 

 

I don't know, but I think I'll holiday in Leghorn this year.

 

9 hours ago, drmditch said:

 

By-the-by I think that the other verses of 'God save the Queen' make much more sense than the first one. 'Confound their knavish tricks, upset their Politics' sounds very appropriate at the moment, depending on who 'they' are. 

 

 

The task of filling up the blanks I'd rather leave to you
But it really doesn't matter whom you put upon the list
For they'd none of 'em be missed — they'd none of 'em be missed!
 

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Its not just the English in these Sceptered Isles that rename places for their own cultural reasons.....

 

(And I'm not just thinking of the renaming of places that English-speaking folk renamed/transliterated to suit their own tongues)

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Ireland: chock full of places that were given English names by phonetic equivalent of the original name, which have then been translated back slightly differently, then re-phoneticised again later.

 

It results in some very weird things like rivers that that are called RiverRiverSomething.

 

Actually, thinking about it, the various English River Avons are River Rivers.

 

Avon, Afon, Abhain, Owen etc

 

And, that’s without the shamelessly colonial names that have now been largely got rid of, and the originally English ones, not phonetic translations, that have then been given Irish equivalents, or the ones where the intermediate English version was a genuine translation, sometimes slightly wrong, rather than a phonetic equivalent.

 

Or, the propensity to give the same geographic feature different names according to where it is viewed from - rivers that change names at townland (parish) boundaries, and hills called one thing looking from the north, and another when looking south.

 

Entire, fat, books exist giving Irish place-name etymologies.

 

Poland ........ ten times more complicated!

Edited by Nearholmer
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Constantinople

 

Having read Byzantine history, I still struggle to think of it as Istanbul, though I realise that this is nobody's business but the Turks.  

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52 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

It results in some very weird things like rivers that that are called RiverRiverSomething.

 

Actually, thinking about it, the various English River Avons are River Rivers.

Also the various rivers Ouse (from old Norse?) and rivers Stour. 

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2 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

rivers that change names at townland (parish) boundaries

Near where I once lived there was a street, the east side of which was Boundary Road, Hove. The west side of the same street was Station Road, Portslade.

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4 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

 

It results in some very weird things like rivers that that are called RiverRiverSomething.

 

Actually, thinking about it, the various English River Avons are River Rivers.

 

Or for added linguistic accretion, may I present

 

Torpenhow (HillHillHill)

 

Sometimes with an appended "Hill" to make sure you've got the idea!

 

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20 hours ago, brack said:

His grandfather, also called Ludwig van Beethoven was Belgian though.

Which does make it technically correct to say that Ludwig van Beethoven was Belgian (or at least from the area we currently know as belgium).

Are we not still pre-grouping pedants? Surely to any self respecting pedant technically correct is the best sort of correctness.

 

A bijou snagette – Beethoven died in 1827, three years before the state of Belgium was created. His grandfather had been born in the Duchy of Brabant, then part of Austria...

 

PS: the umlaut on the Mac keyboard is Alt+u. Simples.

Edited by wagonman
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5 hours ago, Edwardian said:

Königsberg

 

The town where my late mother-in-law was born is likewise so far east it's now in the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad – and renamed in honour of a Red Army general.

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58 minutes ago, wagonman said:

 

The town where my late mother-in-law was born is likewise so far east it's now in the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad – and renamed in honour of a Red Army general.

 

Doesn't have 7 bridges anymore, either.

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1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

Lviv / Lvov / Lwów / Lemberg (in no particular order, there are more). Although Ukranians are reluctant to acknowledge it, the name of their country is "The Borderlands".

Plays "No Rest For the Wicked" by Cage the Elephant

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Don't worry. In Welsh place names can have their first letters changed depending what follows, and in Albanian the ending depends on their function in the sentence.

Anyone fancy a trip to Fanceinion or Caer Efrog?

Fortunately i don't think that either nationality has managed to sabotage East Anglian place names.

And it is questionable whether Beograd should be in the Roman or Ciryllic alphabet.

Jonathan

PS Has Edwardian found his lost town yet?

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Some years ago the diarist in The Herald asked for suggestions of French translations of Scottish place names, which produced some very creative thinking.

 

There was Verre va = Glasgow; Moins Chien = Douglas (dug-les) and Occupé = Tain (taken) among others!

 

Jim

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Well done to your daughter and the layout is becoming a delight the last view of a loco and coach with the castle in the background is a treat. It gives a nice bit of main line to enjoy seeing the trains running. So many of these micro layouts deny one that pleasure.

 

Don

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