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31 minutes ago, RedGemAlchemist said:

 

I remember being told about this too. The 1707 Battle of Almansa, the French were led by the Duke of Berwick and the English by Henri de Massue, an exiled Huguenot who became Earl of Galway. The English were also subcommanded by an 80-year-old Portuguese man.

 

Well done that man!

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

Well done that man!

I come from a family of history nuts :P

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19 hours ago, Edwardian said:

That makes perfect sense, and explains the elevated viewpoint. I had wondered if that was the station starter given how close to the station the marsh starts. 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/1176527988_MarizonMarshes.jpg.fcb29ece0776a94e3f3872486ccd63c9.jpg

 

This stretch of line from St Erth to Marazion wasn't doubled until June 1929. For a circa-1925 photo taken from the bridge, with what is probably the CRE (the stock matches that defined in the 1925 coaches programme) see Mike Morant's site:

This shot of an unidentified GWR Churchward 4300 class mogul dates from circa 1925 and shows the Penzance portion of the down Cornish Riviera Express approaching Marazion at the end of the single line section from St Erth. This section wasn't doubled until June 1929; (the final section of the Cornish main line, Scorrier to Redruth, wasn't doubled until April 1930). The view is from the bridge over the line at the east end of the station with Marazion Marsh behind the train & Marazion village in the hazy distance. The coaches are in the 1922 livery which suggests a mid-1920s date. The make-up of the train: Van 3rd, 3rd, Compo, Diner, Van 3rd, all 68/70ft vehicles, exactly matches that specified for the CRE in the GW's official 'Programme of Working of Coaches in Through trains' for the summer of 1925. [E. A. Gurney-Smith / Mike Morant collection] This image created quite a stir because of the puzzle as to the location. The solution came from members of the GWS, the GWR E-List and Mike Roach who kindly set the ball rolling. My (our) grateful thanks are extended to all of the contributors.

 

Notice the TPO mailbag exchange apparatus hut, which doesn't appear in the painting. Yes, there was such at Marazion in spite of the fact it was only a few miles from Penzance. According to Hosegood's book on GWR TPOs the apparatus was sited 350yds east of the station for up trains, & 605yds west for down trains.  He gives a date of 1913 for first installation. There had been a level crossing at this point until about 1912 when the bridge was built, allowing for double track which allowed the very short headshunt to be extended as seen here.

 

This stretch of Cornish main-line line wasn't the last to be doubled - that dubious honour fell to the section between Scorrier & Redruth, doubled in April 1930. I guess WW1 delayed all doubling work.

 

Martin

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We stayed by the campsite by the pines and found the Pinewoods and the Sands  suited both us and the dogs we also very much enjoyed exploring Wells. Regarding flooding on arriving at the campsite you are given a leaflet about what to do if the Flood Siren goes. The advice was basically if you are a visitor get in  your vehicle and leave with the best route advised. Marion had just read this when a siren went off  her immediate reaction was to get ready to leave only having arrived 30 minutes before hand. However I had noticed the tide was out as we arrived and whilst it had probably turned there was no way any flooding was imminent.  We later found out the siren was to warn people that the incoming tide was about to prevent walking across the mouth of the harbour access and should you be out on the salt marsh side you would be stuck there until the next low tide.

 

Incidently if you are fans of Dectective Novels, Peter Grainger has written a series based around Kings Lynn and the Norfolk coast  which we thoroughly enjoyed.

 

Don

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I was well astray on the battle. I was wandering around this morning's chores pondering over the taking of Quebec and that.

 

One of the most memorable town planning seminars I ever heard (at Kings Manor, York thanks to EU Erasmus funding) was how the axial development of Paris existe dans la tête

The chief planner related a story of the Monarchist and the Mayor standing back to back in the early days of expanding off the ile de France (somewhere to the east of the present day Louvre) and making a pact.  The  Monarchy should look west and the Mayor would look east. From that the great East-West axis evolved : the Louvre, P de la Concorde, Champs Elysees, Arc de Triomphe, La Defense  running westwards and the Hotel de la Ville, Bois de Vincennes eastwards.

Rien de rien must ever close the open axis westwards.

But then Louis XIV sets out to build Versailles - with a canal duplicating and in parallel with the Grand Axis westwards. His vision was that Argosies would arrive under the windows of his palace and unpack their treasures from the Americas.

A difference in height of about 100 M between Rouen and Versailles (besides General Wolfe) paid to realising that.  Milton Keynes's kilometre grid doesn't quite match these Heroics!

dh

 

 

Edited by runs as required
typos
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I thought it was Baron Haussmann who was responsible for the Grandes Boulevards of Paris, radiating from the Étoile. 

Edited by wagonman
grammar
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44 minutes ago, wagonman said:

I thought it was Baron Haussmann who was responsible for the Grandes Boulevards of Paris, radiating from the Étoile. 

 

Haussmann's Boulevards (including the one named after him) don't all radiate from the Arc de Triomphe. That main axis (not quite east/west) is rather splendid even if not quite straight as the road has to go round the Louvre Palace.

 

A complete mystery to me why they allowed La Defense to be built where it is which ruins the view up the Champs-Elysee and through the Arc. Of course, it was a cheap and available site as a former railway marshalling yard.

 

Of course, Haussmann only managed to rebuild a small fraction of Paris. One can still find bits that show their origins as villages that got absorbed by the city. Until about 1900, there were still quite extensive areas of fields within the city defensive walls, which ran roughly where the Blvd Peripherique ring road is now.

Edited by Joseph_Pestell
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For some wonderful photos of old Paris look for the work of Eugene Atget.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Donw said:

 

 

Incidently if you are fans of Dectective Novels, Peter Grainger has written a series based around Kings Lynn and the Norfolk coast  which we thoroughly enjoyed.

 

Don

The inspector George Gently series of books was based in Norfolk too.. Only the TV company moved it to foreign parts.. 

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2 hours ago, DonB said:

 

Boat well heeled over, a rough sea, but not a hair out of place, What a woman !

no doubt the result of suitable stays and hairpins :blush:

 

Nick

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2 hours ago, DonB said:

 

Boat well heeled over, a rough sea, but not a hair out of place, What a woman !

No

No

Yes

Yes

 

No it's not well heeled over.  It is leaning a bit due to her weight- which shows how hard the wind is not blowing.  The sail is filled out but is not sufficiently being pushed to even out the lean.

No that is not a rough sea - believe me.  People have swum the Channel in much worse than that.

Yes not a hair out os place but see above about the force of the wind

Yes - what a woman!

 

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6 hours ago, Joseph_Pestell said:

... . A complete mystery to me why they allowed La Defense to be built where it is which ruins the view up the Champs-Elysee and through the Arc

Of course, it was a cheap and available site as a former railway marshalling yard (agreed) ...

This was exactly the reason for the York Seminar.

Our speaker: the chief planner for Paris, had just completed the masterplan for La Defense (as one of Pres. Mitterand’s ? Grands Projets). 

High rise was the controversial big question of the early 1980s and how it would impact on big European cities. Here planners were in favour of low rise/high density e.g. Alexandria Road terraced housing alongside the line out of Euston.

Paris, after erecting the Montparnasse slab, had given its thumbs down to further building high over rail terminals in central Paris.  So La Defense was conceived as extending the Grand Axis across the Seine to a spectacular Financial skyscraper cluster viewed against the sunset on the old Oak Common railyards . The La Defense monument itself is maybe a cliché concrete picture frame you look through within which a swing is suspended – because markets swing up & down (Geddit?).

 

London pursued a rather weaker policy of concentrating serious high rise in Docklands and (apart from the 1960s high rises at Centrepoint and the rail termini) tried to protect key views of St Pauls from high spots like Sydenham, Richmond Park and Hampstead.

During Johnson’s Mayorship high-rise competition was encouraged to let rip between the City, Docklands, and wherever Developers sensed ‘a rabbit could run away’.

 

Of course the Americans meanwhile have been plugging “New Urbanism”: (conceptually a revival of Edwardian boulevard) building along railtracks. Hence we currently have the Oxbridge railine being developed as a spine of free market development. We may expect a lot more of this - especially along Northern intercity desire lines ...

dh

PS

Despite using the words Edwardian, Euston and rail tracks I hereby apologise for this being the most boring post on James's CA thread,  

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i felt bit depressed after thinking about where things will be going after our de-regulated Brexmas in the above post - so ...marazion.jpg.d2b06208de3525c8086c9b94e711fb5c.jpg

 

... I had a go at reframing Marazion and lightening up the July 2018 Google street view from the over-bridge posted earlier. Interesting to note the comparable field patterns top right .

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Very clever RaR.  Very much the essence of the modern rail system though.  Waterways overgrown and clogged with weeds, the lineside no longer being kept clear of vegetation and despite the double track not a train in sight.

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8 hours ago, runs as required said:

This was exactly the reason for the York Seminar.

Our speaker: the chief planner for Paris, had just completed the masterplan for La Defense (as one of Pres. Mitterand’s ? Grands Projets). 

High rise was the controversial big question of the early 1980s and how it would impact on big European cities. Here planners were in favour of low rise/high density e.g. Alexandria Road terraced housing alongside the line out of Euston.

Paris, after erecting the Montparnasse slab, had given its thumbs down to further building high over rail terminals in central Paris.  So La Defense was conceived as extending the Grand Axis across the Seine to a spectacular Financial skyscraper cluster viewed against the sunset on the old Oak Common railyards . The La Defense monument itself is maybe a cliché concrete picture frame you look through within which a swing is suspended – because markets swing up & down (Geddit?).

 

London pursued a rather weaker policy of concentrating serious high rise in Docklands and (apart from the 1960s high rises at Centrepoint and the rail termini) tried to protect key views of St Pauls from high spots like Sydenham, Richmond Park and Hampstead.

During Johnson’s Mayorship high-rise competition was encouraged to let rip between the City, Docklands, and wherever Developers sensed ‘a rabbit could run away’.

 

Of course the Americans meanwhile have been plugging “New Urbanism”: (conceptually a revival of Edwardian boulevard) building along railtracks. Hence we currently have the Oxbridge railine being developed as a spine of free market development. We may expect a lot more of this - especially along Northern intercity desire lines ...

dh

PS

Despite using the words Edwardian, Euston and rail tracks I hereby apologise for this being the most boring post on James's CA thread,  

 

La Defense was conceived well before Mitterand came to power. Probably the fault of Pompidou.

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5 hours ago, Joseph_Pestell said:

 

La Defense was conceived well before Mitterand came to power. Probably the fault of Pompidou.

 

So, already a pipeline project?

 

Pompidou_Centre_building_technology.jpg.6d3ebe9d2a4ec7484707d25fa18b648a.jpg

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6 hours ago, Joseph_Pestell said:

La Defense was conceived well before Mitterand came to power. Probably the fault of Pompidou.

Possibly true in terms of deciding upon the re-use of the railway land and the general radiating layout. I've just googled Paris Grands Projets and got this which refers to the competition for the actual monument

The Wiki page includes this image - which looks to be taken from the top of the Arc de Triomphe 

747895449_LaDefense.jpg.634e931d8799e7ded8afac91e99c99a4.jpg

We must have been messing about trying to decide what to do with Docklands throughout the late1970s until Heseltine came up with Enterprise zones in the early 1980s and Canada Wharf tower got going .

 

The daftest of all the Grands Projets was the new National library - an upturned table of a building with the bookstacks frying in 4 vast glass towers. Our re-use of the St Pancras Somers Town Goods depot site for the British Library  was so much 'cooler'.

dh

 

 

Edited by runs as required
fat fingered typos
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1 hour ago, runs as required said:

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_11/747895449_LaDefense.jpg.634e931d8799e7ded8afac91e99c99a4.jpg

 

The daftest of all the Grands Projets was the new National library - an upturned table of a building with the bookstacks frying in 4 vast glass towers.

 

 

 

The Library was Mitterand.

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Just in case anyone planned to start any long books, do not bother, the world will come to a horrible end (or at least Woking, Byfleet, Chobham and other parts of the stockbroker belt will) shortly after 9:00pm on Sunday 17th November.

https://www.radiotimes.com/news/tv/2019-11-08/the-war-of-the-worlds-spoiler-free-preview-a-solid-and-interesting-adaptation/

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7 minutes ago, Martin S-C said:

Just in case anyone planned to start any long books, do not bother, the world will come to a horrible end (or at least Woking, Byfleet, Chobham and other parts of the stockbroker belt will) shortly after 9:00pm on Sunday 17th November.

https://www.radiotimes.com/news/tv/2019-11-08/the-war-of-the-worlds-spoiler-free-preview-a-solid-and-interesting-adaptation/

 

That should solve a few problems then!:yes:

The only version of this tale that made a lasting impression upon me was the BBC radio broadcast of years ago which used Mars from Holst's Planets suite.  Scary stuff which beat out all the later TV and movie versions, CGI and all!

      Brian.

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56 minutes ago, Martin S-C said:

Just in case anyone planned to start any long books, do not bother, the world will come to a horrible end (or at least Woking, Byfleet, Chobham and other parts of the stockbroker belt will) shortly after 9:00pm on Sunday 17th November.

https://www.radiotimes.com/news/tv/2019-11-08/the-war-of-the-worlds-spoiler-free-preview-a-solid-and-interesting-adaptation/

 


I say, that's awfully close to Linton - barely five miles from Linton to Maybury... Maybe I'd better have a battered tripod painted on the backscene. After all, 1900 (the start of when Linton's to be set) is just after the last years of the nineteenth century...

Edited by Skinnylinny
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I saw a trailer. I must say that Horsell Common was somewhat hillier, verging on mountainous, than 20 years ago when I lived and worked in the area...

 

Must have been the result of all that new-town type planning they did around Woking in the 70s...

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So, do we reckon the railway bits (if there are any? Surely there must be some - there are enough in the novel!) will be up to much or will it be a case of a BR Standard on a MK1 set trying to play at being pre-grouping? :P 

 

That said... without resorting to CGI they'd be hard pushed to find real vehicles enough to make complete trains of LSWR, SER, LNWR, MR and GNR stock these days. I don't know of any recent MHR filming though so it probably wasn't there (not that we have any appropriate stock) so if they did bother to film any real railway scenes then I imagine it fell to the Bluebell to provide those. If they filmed it early enough this year then they might have managed a period loco and coach in the correct livery for the LSWR (488 and the LSWR Brake 3rd).

Edited by sem34090
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7 hours ago, Martin S-C said:

Just in case anyone planned to start any long books, do not bother, the world will come to a horrible end (or at least Woking, Byfleet, Chobham and other parts of the stockbroker belt will) shortly after 9:00pm on Sunday 17th November.

https://www.radiotimes.com/news/tv/2019-11-08/the-war-of-the-worlds-spoiler-free-preview-a-solid-and-interesting-adaptation/

 

Call that a war - just wait'll the BBC does The War of the Gauges. See the horrifying depiction of Isambard Kingdom Brunel transformed into a death ray dealing monster with three, yes count them, three legs as he smites the proponents of standard gauge with jets of super heated steam and cigar smoke. See England's green and pleasant land terrorised by giant clones of the Lord of the Isles as it's great wheels crush helpless women and children and hapless British Tommys. 

 

And coming next year from the BBC an even more epic drama Nationalisation and the ruthless rise to power of British Rail.

 

And wait to you see their reality TV show Which is better OO or O?

 

..... I could go on but I won't.   :help:  

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