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Maybe he's more like the Ian Carmichael character  in the film 'Lucky Jim':D

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24 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

 

I fear I'm being typecast ...

 

ripping_ogilvy.jpg.86233edd4e9d8192521c11bd56d48ce3.jpg

 

Not at all: I was just amused that the prototype was James Lord.

(And I do know that it would only be "Lord James" if James was your surname.)

 

Just now, Nearholmer said:

You could add ‘Lord Jim’, by Joseph Conrad, to your reading list, if you are content with the contraction. It’s an interesting tale.

 

As long as it doesn't take anyone into the heart of darkness...

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IIRC, one of the characters turns-up in both, but I might not have remembered correctly.

 

It’s the narrator, Marlow.

 

 

Edited by Nearholmer

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1 hour ago, Edwardian said:

If Tom elects to develop these FJ/Lowca 0-6-0s for Hardy's Hobbies to market as body kits for the Terrier chassis (I guess this is where Tom is going with this), I'd be interested

Hang on, did I just read Fletcher Jennings / Lowca  ? Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition - at last ! 

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33 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

You could add ‘Lord Jim’, by Joseph Conrad, to your reading list, if you are content with the contraction. It’s an interesting tale.

 

It crossed my mind. It's an age since I read it, but rather a tragic tale as I recall   

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1 hour ago, Edwardian said:

If Tom elects to develop these FJ/Lowca 0-6-0s for Hardy's Hobbies to market as body kits for the Terrier chassis (I guess this is where Tom is going with this), I'd be interested, particularly if the earlier version, T B Wood (1899), or James Lord (1903), were included.

 

I ain't sayin' nuffin!

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5 hours ago, Edwardian said:

I'm also enjoying The Private Railways of County Durham

 

An exposé of the scandalous goings-on out of the sight of HMRI's Inspecting Officers? - tut, such sensationalist reading!

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25 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

 

An exposé of the scandalous goings-on out of the sight of HMRI's Inspecting Officers? - tut, such sensationalist reading!

 

I did wonder why the jovial proprietor of Grosmont Books passed it to me under the counter in a brown paper wrapping. 

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Dreadful but, at the price of books these days, probably not Penny.

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8 hours ago, Regularity said:

 

Not at all: I was just amused that the prototype was James Lord.

(And I do know that it would only be "Lord James" if James was your surname.)

 

 

Not necessarily.  Where lord is in use as a courtesy title for the son of a high-ranking peer, it could be Lord [first name].

 

As such, it is used just like "honourable".  The Honourable [first name] [surname]. or, on repetition, merely the Honourable [first name], is applied to younger sons and daughters of most ranks of peerage.  The equivalent for younger sons of the higher ranks of dukes and marquesses is Lord.

 

To pick a familiar historic example, the third son of the Marquess of Blandford was Lord Randolf Churchill, Randolf being his first, or given, name.  

 

 

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I sometimes wonder if in those far off days in the past when I was messing around with my Triang trainset, had my future life been suddenly revealed to me what i would have done.  Run away screaming more than likely.

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11 minutes ago, Annie said:

I sometimes wonder if in those far off days in the past when I was messing around with my Triang trainset, had my future life been suddenly revealed to me what i would have done.  Run away screaming more than likely.

 

Foresight is something we are fortunate to be without.

 

If I'd had it, I'd have known not to bother.  Still, I calculate that I am loved by 7 souls in this world, though admittedly 3 of them belong to Labradors, and that, together with friends and the constant kindness of strangers, that is quite enough to live on, so I shall stop moping!   

 

 

 

Edited by Edwardian
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All very true James.  When I get all mopy about the horrors and trials of my past I look at my two now very much grown up adult children and I know it was all worth it.

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I don't sense any great waste of time in those photos. Judging by your profession  I dont think you neglected your education and there should be more to life than just education. Games sport etc. but a constructive hobby seems a good choice to me.  True model railways are a pastime with no great meaning but I have long since accepted that there will be no great meaning to my life. I am proud of many things we have done but doing up houses or creating pleasant gardens are only admired at the time. I doubt anyone in future will looking back and saying those two did a grand job on that place. The software I developed in my working life will have long since been replaced, cables I jointed replaced with optic fibre ones.

If I can avoid distressing others and make some smile now and then all well and good. If I am lucky there may be a half page obituary in one of the magazines  but I will not have any satisfaction of reading it. Perhaps I might have done more but I am a bit of a daydreamer. Be content with ones life. I there are things you are ashamed about try to make amends if possible but certainly strive not to do such things. Be kind towards others and accept their aims and standards may differ from yours. Enjoy your passions where possible what is life without them.

 

Don  

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Hi Donw, you could do an Ernest Hemingway and get a mistaken obituary.

When he E.H. the great writter was in Africa his light aircraft crashed on take-off, they survived with injures and whilst he was convalescing he enjoyed the act of reading his obituaries as the newspapers rushed to print their standby autobiographies of him as soon as they got a hint of the crash.

Misleading news? The media love to report any bad news, it sells, plane wrecks etc.

Being in a remote part of Africa he had to wait several weeks for the newspapers to reach him but enjoyed reading about his own death.

So retreat to a remote location, with internet, releases a rummer and watch the obituary section in Modelling, Musings and Miscellany.

Perhaps getting an obituary in the Railway Modeller is better than The Times?

RH

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42 minutes ago, Donw said:

I don't sense any great waste of time in those photos. Judging by your profession  I dont think you neglected your education and there should be more to life than just education. Games sport etc. but a constructive hobby seems a good choice to me.  True model railways are a pastime with no great meaning but I have long since accepted that there will be no great meaning to my life. I am proud of many things we have done but doing up houses or creating pleasant gardens are only admired at the time. I doubt anyone in future will looking back and saying those two did a grand job on that place. The software I developed in my working life will have long since been replaced, cables I jointed replaced with optic fibre ones.

If I can avoid distressing others and make some smile now and then all well and good. If I am lucky there may be a half page obituary in one of the magazines  but I will not have any satisfaction of reading it. Perhaps I might have done more but I am a bit of a daydreamer. Be content with ones life. I there are things you are ashamed about try to make amends if possible but certainly strive not to do such things. Be kind towards others and accept their aims and standards may differ from yours. Enjoy your passions where possible what is life without them.

 

Don  

 

You are quite right, of course.

 

Truth is, I've mucked life up quite a bit, and, at my age, the necessary belief that I can somehow still pull it round is quite vulnerable to set-backs.  Still, moping about it won't help, so b*gger all self-indulgent biscuit-eaters and let's get on!

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2 hours ago, Edwardian said:

If I'd had it, I'd have known not to bother.  Still, I calculate that I am loved by 7 souls in this world, though admittedly 3 of them belong to Labradors,

 

Labs are the Most Useful dogs in the world!

 

The only time you should NOT appreciate a friendly Labrador is if you encounter one in an airport...

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Having kids is all very well and good, but then they have kids, and next thing you know “mum and dad, could you look after the girls this weekend?” What happens Sunday? yeah...

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2 minutes ago, Northroader said:

Having kids is all very well and good, but then they have kids, and next thing you know “mum and dad, could you look after the girls this weekend?” What happens Sunday? yeah...

 

Neither of my children have grown up as model railway fans, though it held Miss T in thrall for a time, so, frankly, if there are Grandkids, I view that as a second bite of the cherry!

 

 

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Fair enough, I love them to bits, it’s just unfortunate timing.

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34 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

Truth is, I've mucked life up quite a bit, and, at my age, the necessary belief that I can somehow still pull it round is quite vulnerable to set-backs. 

Plenty of us on here in a similar plight.

Whilst I agree that the "necessary belief" can be vulnerable to set-backs, I view that as a learning experience too. Had quite a few 1-5-5s, and have learned to accept them as part of life's threadbare carpet (the rich tapestry seems to have passed out of my hands!)

 

On the other hand, it could be a lot, lot worse. My health could be better, but it could be an awful lot worse and there is still time to turn it around. I still have all my train stuff, and I still have friends as well as two wonderfully weird kids.

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31 minutes ago, Regularity said:

Plenty of us on here in a similar plight.

Whilst I agree that the "necessary belief" can be vulnerable to set-backs, I view that as a learning experience too. Had quite a few 1-5-5s, and have learned to accept them as part of life's threadbare carpet (the rich tapestry seems to have passed out of my hands!)

 

On the other hand, it could be a lot, lot worse. My health could be better, but it could be an awful lot worse and there is still time to turn it around. I still have all my train stuff, and I still have friends as well as two wonderfully weird kids.

 

I'm much the same.  Unfortunately, sometimes the inability just to count my blessings, which are considerable, and be content causes guilt that feeds into a downward spiral.

 

The answer seems to be periodic self-administered kicks up the backside (which are considerably easier to execute if left metaphorical), cheered on by sympathetic onlookers!

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46 minutes ago, Northroader said:

Fair enough, I love them to bits, it’s just unfortunate timing.

 

Many children, and, I daresay, therefore, grandchildren, result from exactly that.

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3 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

 

I'm much the same.  Unfortunately, sometimes the inability just to count my blessings, which are considerable, and be content causes guilt that feeds into a downward spiral.

 

The answer seems to be periodic self-administered kicks up the backside (which are considerably easier to execute if left metaphorical), cheered on by sympathetic onlookers!

Quite happy to do it physically, in person, at Doncaster, if you wish!

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