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That ones a 3d printed body from Shapeways on a Hornby pug chassis. The name plates are from Narrow Planet with a Modelu crew.
 

You can also use a pannier cab with a smokey joe boiler. This is Trojan in its Alders paper mill livery, (although the chimney is technically wrong)

 

B59D68CB-5D5F-4835-A844-8814B7BE0EE5.jpeg.05219895e7b6d14ff4e94f550b14ea69.jpeg

 

Both were fun projects all the same.

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I do really like that loco! I imagine that the hardest (and most expensive) part to get hold of is the Hornby Pug chassis? I think I have the other bits lying around somewhere!

 

Edit: I was wrong. There's lots on eBay.

Edited by MrWolf
SNAFU
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Weathered another pannier over the weekend.  The aim was to make it look like 3711 behind it.

 

IMG_2586.JPG.31a965b91d7732fbc8b7fc0b112b28ba.JPG

 

I don't think its come out too badly, although I need to knock off some of the powder that has collected behind the handrail.

 

IMG_2641.JPG.faf46308bc54002a687a00588fa9c510.JPG

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One of the things that I need to sort out is weathering the coaches.  As you can see for the focus stack below, they look just too clean!

 

6.jpg.c5f241aa73569f207d2d8ae36f920de2.jpg

 

Well whilst my wife watches Eastenders, I made my escape to attack the Hornby Railroad full brake that I've got stashed acting as a test subject.

 

IMG_2675.JPG.d7f5b9976af4deea4414767fed9f5d57.JPG

 

So my first attempt was to use diluted black Humbrol, and to wipe it off in a vertical pattern.  Whilst its provides a passable weathering effect, to my eye at least it just looks to harsh!

 

IMG_2677.JPG.e808c610198381cf98569425ff248a5c.JPG

 

A check on some historical photos shows that passenger stock wasn't that run down. After all, fare paying passengers wouldn't want to sit in grubby coaches.  (That 64xx is also alot cleaner than I usually model)

 

GWR 6435 at St Fagans September 1960 by John Wiltshire

 

So what to do?  I had heard about using T-cut.  The bottle that I keep ironically for modelling purposes was found and the coach was very lightly wiped, then buffed with a cotton bud, before being brushed with a tooth brush.  After all, only a modeller would keep T-cut and floor varnish and use it not for their designed purposes!

 

IMG_2684.JPG.8f69ddcc07bccee704ba2c317703dac8.JPG

 

That looks better! And below with an out of the box railroad Mk1 for comparison

 

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I quite like the variations in the maroon paint that the out of the box model doesn't have.  I haven't got onto the underframe yet, but its likely that'll just get treated with dark earth weathering powder.  Anyway, I wanted to make sure I was happy with the bodysides first before going any further.

 

IMG_2688.JPG.4ccdce1bbfb9cdc51358ade9d14a4675.JPG

 

Interestingly, the photos I've found show the roofs to be a much darker shade of grey. I need to give that a bit of thought to mimic the colour and texture.

 

1965 - Leaving Aylesbury..

 

I think I'm heading in the right direction.

 

IMG_2689.JPG.1faf240eb86dbbc44b6a38ceea5871f9.JPG

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Martin Welch reckons he takes off most of the weathering he applies, but that this reflects the real thing: trains get dirty, and passenger locos and coaches get wiped down, so dirt starts to accumulate in the cracks and crevices.

As for the coach roofs, a major constituent of the grey was white lead, which reacted with the sulphur in the atmosphere to turn darker and darker, in a fairly uniform manner, so any shade between the staring colour and almost black will do, and any weathering will be rain streaks accumulated when the stock was standing - which was most of the time!

As the roof is canvas over planks, the texture is quite matt: Matt paint may suffice.

(If building from scratch, you could put fine tissue paper over the roof, and then add the beading strips on top, but it probably isn’t worth the effort. You could try fine talc sifted onto wet paint, but it needs a delicate touch.)

Edited by Regularity
Texture
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The description of removing most of the weathering does seem to reflect the process I followed.  However I did find a photo of a slightly grubby full brake.  Again another example of a dark grey roof with a fine texture. I had no idea it was a lead reaction to the sulphur. I shall have to try a few ideas on the full brake.

 

1960 - 'Tees-Thames' Leaving..

 

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Had another go with the full brake.  Tonight's task was to darken the roof.  The roof was painted with Humbrol 32, and dappled with Humbrol black weathering powder whilst still tacky.  Another coat of Humbrol was then lightly applied over the top which dissolves some of the powder, and resulting in a closer match to the photograph.

 

IMG_2704.JPG.0ad142b0feb3843abaf495833e7426d0.JPG

 

Because some of the weathering powder got onto the sides of the coach, I removed this using the T-cut and cotton bud technique.  Working with weathering powder on the coach sides seems to have resulted in a more convincing effect than using diluted black paint.

 

IMG_2700.JPG.c1a82fec80068af03aafa77b892f9e61.JPG

 

And again a comparison with an unworked coach out of the box.

 

IMG_2701.JPG.d9c5adeb1a098ea5f47f7c146b0dc4a1.JPG

 

I guess the real answer is am I happy with the coach, and I prefer this to Tuesdays attempt.

 

IMG_2702.JPG.24e7e459cf405f4023989793cfea1b9c.JPG

 

I still need to do the underframe!

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A photo of the full brake on the layout as opposed to the photo plank.

 

528ADC9F-6F6A-4935-B56F-81EBBACF68DD.jpeg.87a7c671af5186bcf6d129f9e4a0585d.jpeg

 

The roof is a bit streaky now the paint has cured, so I’ll experiment with adding talc to some paint for the next coach and see if that works better as a technique. I have a bottle of talc ready to go. (I was very glad I didn’t have to explain to anyone why I was in the baby aisle where it was stocked in my local supermarket!)

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There’s one problem with this weathering technique. Just spent a relaxing hour working on the Railroad corridor second mk1, and this is the pile of cotton buds left over from a single coach! 
 

3924A118-2F5E-4245-88D6-F5BA554B47CA.jpeg.5f8f2fac572809634ca9896e015ee213.jpeg

 

Might have to buy a few more tubs when I do my essential lockdown shopping. (Either that or take out shares in a cotton bud factory!)

Edited by Chris Chewter
Realised it’s a SK and not a TSO
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Progressed the second corridor, but not convinced by the roof effect. Here I’ve stippled talc onto a layer of wet paint and brushed most of it off. However it’s too lumpy to my eye. (Which is why I’m trying this on a Railroad coach first!)

 

A9E9F1BC-83E5-40AB-8E8A-CB34FC9CF120.jpeg.5a4d892c2507aeccaf0bd68177dc42f6.jpeg

 

I’ve even tried to sand some of it back with some very fine wet and dry. The plastic on these railroad coaches is so soft, it’s easy to take the top off the ventilators!

 

However the Railmatch roof dirt grey used on the roof is a fairly good match.

 

E42D644C-24CE-4E0F-A419-57A17AE5FE77.jpeg.5125751ac5c62629240f28d4f52175dd.jpeg

 

The SK is second in formation here.

 

So I omitted the talc on the the next coach, and that’s turned out a lot better.

 

4988CC7F-44F1-45F9-BEB6-DF7B24EF77D3.jpeg.1f265ed3bb4f3641774a7e07bbc3dd39.jpeg

 

This is two coats of Railmatch roof dirt, a light coat of Humbrol black weathering powder, and two more coats of Railmatch roof dirt to give the roof its regular colour. It’s dulled down with Matt acrylic varnish from an aerosol.

 

E2BC5801-607D-4A5F-9E9C-4DD21D00815B.jpeg.1f16a9684d85618c65af773025fb3f31.jpeg
 

That looks far better than the out of the box appearance to me.

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8 minutes ago, Chris Chewter said:

Progressed the second corridor, but not convinced by the roof effect. Here I’ve stippled talc onto a layer of wet paint and brushed most of it off. However it’s too lumpy to my eye. (Which is why I’m trying this on a Railroad coach first!)

 

A9E9F1BC-83E5-40AB-8E8A-CB34FC9CF120.jpeg.5a4d892c2507aeccaf0bd68177dc42f6.jpeg

 

I’ve even tried to sand some of it back with some very fine wet and dry. The plastic on these railroad coaches is so soft, it’s easy to take the top off the ventilators!

 

However the Railmatch roof dirt grey used on the roof is a fairly good match.

 

E42D644C-24CE-4E0F-A419-57A17AE5FE77.jpeg.5125751ac5c62629240f28d4f52175dd.jpeg

 

The SK is second in formation here.

 

So I omitted the talc on the the next coach, and that’s turned out a lot better.

 

4988CC7F-44F1-45F9-BEB6-DF7B24EF77D3.jpeg.1f265ed3bb4f3641774a7e07bbc3dd39.jpeg

 

This is two coats of Railmatch roof dirt, a light coat of Humbrol black weathering powder, and two more coats of Railmatch roof dirt to give the roof its regular colour. It’s dulled down with Matt acrylic varnish from an aerosol.

 

E2BC5801-607D-4A5F-9E9C-4DD21D00815B.jpeg.1f16a9684d85618c65af773025fb3f31.jpeg
 

That looks far better than the out of the box appearance to me.


Hi Chris.  I’m not an expert (just someone else up early on Saturday!) but I’ve been following this weathering exercise with great interest: I like the way you’ve tried it out and written it up for the rest of us.  From what I can see, it does like this third go has worked best, followed perhaps by the first one.  The second carriage does look a bit ‘lumpy’ as you say, because of the talc.  For the price, the Railroad coaches don’t look at all bad, to be honest, but yours now look much better.  Keith.

Edited by Keith Addenbrooke
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Well the SK has a date with the oven cleaner!  Its been disassembled and waiting for a dip.  The roof and body sides are a single piece of plastic, plus the windows are glued into position, so the entire top half has to go for a bath!

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The next on the weathering list are the wester region suburban pair.

 

5.jpg.224da49b03f0cc44d332039b0976382f.jpg

 

But first, I need to sort out the last two Railroad mk1s. The lumpy texture has been removed from the SK yesterday, and I have another brake second which I've simply painted the roof to as a comparison. 

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This is the SK this morning. Sat in the naughty box awaiting its fate!

 

ED0C9BCA-553C-4835-AB51-8E8ECB17172A.jpeg.0e504213d83b2e43f4c2e308de7becf6.jpeg
 

Next to it is my other railroad mk1 second brake. I’ve simply painted the roof to this one. It now needs the sides and under frame to be weathered.

 

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Made some progress with the suburban set last night, but things haven't gone to plan.  Looking through some photos, and I noticed that most coaches have a bit of a shine to them.

 

1964 - Short Special..

 

Whilst watching Right Track 11, I noticed that Tim Shackleton applies Johnsons Klear to a Stove R to give it a bit of gloss.  Well, the Klear I have didn't go on cleanly, so I decided to give the coaches a coat of Humbrol gloss cote.  Perhaps that wasn't such a good idea. Its given the coaches a lovely lustre.

 

IMG_2805.JPG.44530030507de318308f30a41ff9bae5.JPG

 

Lets be honest, that's just too glossy.  But lets look at the positives here, I'm really pleased with that roof.  That's Humbrol matt black aerosol with smoke grey weathering powder which I think has come out well. 

 

Looks like I need to apply some matt or satin varnish to take the edge off the shine.

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