Jump to content

Penlan

Horse and Cart - Standing

Recommended Posts

From the NRM's photo of Reading - Vastern Yard 1904 - a modelling detail for those who have a horse & Cart stood in their Goods yard.

So often I see a scene on a layout where the horse is ready for the off, rather than relaxing, awaiting a load.

 

post-6979-0-63974900-1455192844.jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the NRM's photo of Reading - Vastern Yard 1904 - a modelling detail for those who have a Horse & Cart stood in their Goods Yard.

So often I see a scene on a layout where the horse is ready for the off, rather than relaxing, awaiting a load.
Sorry about the quality, but it's a scan from a book, not a real photo.

 

post-6979-0-63974900-1455192844.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget that sometimes there's a small pile of droppings as well, the colour depending on what the particular horse has been feeding on  and how long the pile's been there - they tend to darken over time.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It's a waggon (2 axles) not a cart (1 axle), but a very valid point.

Edited by Jondi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I did an 00  nag like that for Dart castings  but with out the feed bag .I called it a Vanner but in the general sense not the breed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't see the photo, but part of the problem, at least in 4mm, is that the people producing model horses have, so far, preferred to model them in frozen action, making them look very uncomfortable.  Fortunately Dart Castings seem to have grasped the issue, as their latest offerings are more static.  I have suggested to the proprietor, on a number of occasions that horses posed with their heads down in their nose-bags would also be a good idea, but so far to no avail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking of Alfsboy's Vanner when I responded to the parallel post which has no picture. Dart also do Shires and Suffolk Punches in a more static mode, suitable for standing around patiently in the yard, but none with their heads down and feeding.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, so far as my modelling is concerned, horses where attached to vehicles will most often be standing in a station forecourt or a goods yard.  This is an area in which manufacturers could well take note of what I tend to think of as "Rice's First Law of Movement", which states "never depict frozen movement".

 

Static figures have been the prevailing taste for some years now, but ranges still include cast accessories I recall from boyhood, so catching up cannot be an overnight thing.  I would support the idea of introducing more head down horses with nose-bags.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More likely to be by a water trough. The Clydesdales I used to look after were capable of processing vast quantities of water especially when pulling the dray. They were also terrible,'leaners' they leaned on each other and agaist the shafts if close to a wall, oh and me between the yard and the loosebox.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Clydesdales I used to look after were capable of processing vast quantities of water especially when pulling the dray. They were also terrible,'leaners' they leaned on each other and agaist the shafts if close to a wall, oh and me between the yard and the loosebox.

I can vouch for that!  My daughter has a horse which is a 17 hands half Clydesdale and if you stand beside her (the horse that is, not my daughter!) you suddenly become aware of the weight of a massive head resting on your shoulder!

BTW, the Clydesdale breed originated at Lochlyoch Farm in the shadow of Tinto Hill, some 8 miles from where I sit at the moment.

 

Jim

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Acquaintance of mine has a Clydesdale gelding. She stands about 5'3"; her horse is not far off 18 hands, and is easily the biggest horse on the yard, towering over my 16hh Irish Draught.

 

I've never asked why the apparent mismatch between horse and rider, but I guess she likes 'em big. And, God Almighty, Glenn is as big as they come:

 

post-6879-0-20287100-1455474657_thumb.jpg

 

His shoes are, well, not within the standard size range. I'm told that they cost £130 per set, which is double the cost of a normal-sized horse's shoes. And that set has to be replaced every four to six weeks.....

Edited by Horsetan
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...........And, God Almighty, Glenn is as big as they come. His shoes are, well, not within the standard size range.

Our previous house was built by a retired farmer and he had kept a Clydesdale in the 1 acre field which went with the house.  I found a Clydesdale shoe in the garden once.  It was over 12" across!  One great attribute of Clydesdales is that they have a very laid-back and gentle temperament, for all their size (which is more than can be said for my daughter's first horse which was a thoroughbred and would have kicked you into the next field given half a chance!).

 

Jim

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I had a Thoroughbred briefly. She was a 5-year-old at the time, and had come out of a racing yard. She was absurdly quick compared to anything else I'd ridden before. Here she is:

 

post-6879-0-82112900-1455406072.jpg

 

post-6879-0-13434400-1455405260_thumb.jpg

 

Quite wilful, though, and - for a while - asking her to walk up a particular hill involved lengthy negotiations. At one point it looked as though we would only go up that hill sideways.

 

I'd have another one, though. Even if they don't race under Rules, they still make useful point-to-pointers.

 

Speaking of racing, I see that one or two racecourses have had an occasional tendency in the last couple of years to send Clydesdales and Shires over a distance of two furlongs, ridden by professional jockeys, for demonstration purposes. The resultant vibrations probably register on the Richter Scale:

 

Edited by Horsetan
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once had the choice of a barbed wire fence / thorn hedge or my head meeting a rapidly approachin 11" Clydesdale 'boot'. Some cretin had disturbed mum while I was checking on her foal.

My mate finished up in the old duck pond in a similar close encounter. When the horses first came out of their looseboxes it wasn't unusual to be lifted clear of the ground on the halter ropes. The sight of an 18 stone man, rugby prop forward at that, being swung, both feet off the ground up a 1 in 3 hill is a sight to see and not a little terrifying to a skinny kid like I was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horse wow, that's incredible. I've only ever ridden a Shire or Clydesdale bareback. I cannot begin to tell you how painful that was at a trot or a canter. Gallop? No thanks, I like to be able to sit down later. Having a Shire approaching at a gallop because it knows you have a bottle of Guinness for it - scary.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horse wow, that's incredible. I've only ever ridden a Shire or Clydesdale bareback. I cannot begin to tell you how painful that was at a trot or a canter. Gallop? No thanks, I like to be able to sit down later. Having a Shire approaching at a gallop because it knows you have a bottle of Guinness for it - scary.

I'll ride pretty much anything bareback, large or small:

 

post-6879-0-18968200-1455399592_thumb.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...I found a Clydesdale shoe in the garden once.  It was over 12" across!  One great attribute of Clydesdales is that they have a very laid-back and gentle temperament, for all their size....

Glenn learnt to say "please" by lifting a foreleg whenever he wanted something. Trouble is, we can't stop him doing it....

 

post-6879-0-67756300-1455475756_thumb.jpg

 

Just compare the size of his legs and feet with those of Jelly the Thoroughbred above. He's a bit like Irn-Bru - built from Girders, and about as heavy as the Forth Bridge.

Edited by Horsetan
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.