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great pics

Couple of things i hadn't really appreciated before: 

Didn't realise they were to 'Ferry' spec (inc. 'continental' vehicle info markings at the L.H end), presumably there was, at some point, the idea they might work through to the Continent?

Nice little detail is the small 'skylight' windows in the roof, though i doubt much daylight actually got in through the layer of dirt on them.

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10 hours ago, montyburns56 said:

A nice set of pictures which might  inspire someone to produce a model of the TCV Newton Chambers Car Carriers. Pretty please....

 

A681C-015

 

A681C-037

 

A781D-009(HR)

 

A781D-010(HR)

 

A681C-036

 

A681C-035 A681C-034

 

A681C-032

 

A681C-031

 

A681C-016

 

A681C-014

 

 

A681C-013

 

A681C-012

 

A681C-011

 

by Jamerail

The Southern Pride Kit is a nice model and not the hardest to build, it is slightly tall though. I will be selling mine at some point as I have switched to 0 gauge.

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9 hours ago, keefer said:

great pics

Couple of things i hadn't really appreciated before: 

Didn't realise they were to 'Ferry' spec (inc. 'continental' vehicle info markings at the L.H end), presumably there was, at some point, the idea they might work through to the Continent?

Nice little detail is the small 'skylight' windows in the roof, though i doubt much daylight actually got in through the layer of dirt on them.

I believe their 'goods' counterparts were also to ferry spec. I wonder if either type crossed the Channel? Presumably, it would have been on Trade car traffic.

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12 hours ago, 37114 said:

The Southern Pride Kit is a nice model and not the hardest to build, it is slightly tall though. I will be selling mine at some point as I have switched to 0 gauge.

 

Yeah, but the problem with a self build is getting the livery finish right so that it doesn't stand out with other RTR items, plus I model in N gauge anyway so...... I did intended to tag Ben Ando from RevolutioN Trains in the post , but I couldn't work out how to do it.

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54 minutes ago, montyburns56 said:

 

Yeah, but the problem with a self build is getting the livery finish right so that it doesn't stand out with other RTR items, plus I model in N gauge anyway so...... I did intended to tag Ben Ando from RevolutioN Trains in the post , but I couldn't work out how to do it.

The Newton Chambers TCV is available in N gauge as a Multi media kit from Etched Pixels. 
3D printed body. Etched bass ends, bogies, roof lights and solebars. Brass buffers. The sides are downloaded file to print on photopaper.

These are two of four I have. One weathered one not.

8CB20DCB-C39C-41C3-90B1-9D65DCE93B4A.jpeg

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Don't think you have to worry too much about the exact shade of blue for them as they seem to have been usually pretty filthy!

There was a debate at one point as to whether the solebars and well were blue or not (they were) but it took a rare photo on Flickr of a relatively clean example to prove it.

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On 16/07/2021 at 19:56, keefer said:

Don't think you have to worry too much about the exact shade of blue for them as they seem to have been usually pretty filthy!

There was a debate at one point as to whether the solebars and well were blue or not (they were) but it took a rare photo on Flickr of a relatively clean example to prove it.


I think it’s quite likely that when they were just painted blue, was the only time they were clean it that livery! They were very intensively used especially over the summer timetable, with the outlying terminal points lacking any washing facilities.

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On 25/06/2020 at 19:18, D826 said:

This might be of interest - Kenny O, Westerns, a glimpse of a peak, sunny Devon, sand, hydraulics, heaven !

 

 

 

The motorail with sleepers, so presumably to Scotland, has a pair of Class 25s being used, presumably for the short stretch to Willesden Jct. where no doubt an Electric would have been put on the front.

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On 15/07/2021 at 20:07, montyburns56 said:

A nice set of pictures which might  inspire someone to produce a model of the TCV Newton Chambers Car Carriers. Pretty please....

 

A681C-015

 

A681C-037

 

A781D-009(HR)

 

A781D-010(HR)

 

A681C-036

 

A681C-035 A681C-034

 

A681C-032

 

A681C-031

 

A681C-016

 

A681C-014

 

 

A681C-013

 

A681C-012

 

A681C-011

 

by Jamerail

I met a retired railwayman who was involved with the TVC carriers, he told me they were conversions and it was a tight budget throughout, he told me of an incident which led to the ban on the use of one of the decks and the reduced capacity per TCV  was a major blow to the profitability of the TCV.

Is there any information as to the origin of the TCVs. Are those short wheelbase bogies Hawksworth designs ? Were the original stock by the GWR?  I hope one day we may have them  in 4mm RTR

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31 minutes ago, Pandora said:

I met a retired railwayman who was involved with the TVC carriers, he told me they were conversions and it was a tight budget throughout, he told me of an incident which led to the ban on the use of one of the decks and the reduced capacity per TCV  was a major blow to the profitability of the TCV.

Is there any information as to the origin of the TCVs. Are those short wheelbase bogies Hawksworth designs ? Were the original stock by the GWR?  I hope one day we may have them  in 4mm RTR

Not a GWR design, nor a conversion; they were built by a firm called 'Newton Chambers' of Sheffield, a company whose other products included 'Izal', the non-stick toilet paper. As well as the enclosed ones, there were some open-sided ones to carry new car traffic. Both types were ferry-registered, though I've never seen any evidence they ever left the UK.

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The bodywork is mostly correct if a little heavy, but you're right, the bogies were standard Tri-ang diamond frame (always plastic as far as I know, too late for the metal variety) and they should have been plate frame. No holes, so not quite the GWR pattern though the axleboxes were the split type. There's a picture in an old BTC booklet I've got "Freight Transport", circa 1960 and the markings show it was operated by M.A.T. Transport who later had Cartic-4s.

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Although not BR mk1 stock they are featured in the Parkin book. As he states, there wasn't anything BR Standard about them.

The bogies were 6'9" wheelbase meaning there was space for two smaller cars in the lower well (between the bogies), reached by a hydraulic platform. Presumably the incident often referred to was a case of someone being trapped by the platform.

They could carry up to 4 cars on the 'level' deck and, like with the GUVs, the ends opened (with drop-down flaps) so that cars could be driven on from one end.

They entered service in 1961 with an 'E' suffix to their number (suffixes on stock built during BR often signified non-standard stock)

 

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From another forum, the incident with the TCV:

 

 

The fatal accident to TCV E96291E (iirc) occurred when a lift failed, crushing an MGB and, unfortunately, the person loading it. They had to recover him by going in through the side, which afterwards had a patch in it to denote exactly where they went in. The lifts were immediately taken out of use but after a couple of years, when a modification was made to the locking arrangement, they were re-instated but the TCV's reputation with the staff never really recovered and they were eventually withdrawn.
 

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  • 4 weeks later...

That's the photo I think I referenced before, in that it was proof that the solebars/wells were indeed painted blue.

Up until then there had been many discussions but no evidence - as mentioned before, the lower half of the TCVs was so mucky it was impossible to tell and there are hardly any pics of them ex-works in blue.

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I wonder if it was the last time they had a full repaint?:D

Notice the bogie locks picked out in red/yellow and the white marks painted on the body corners - IIRC these were something to do with vehicles that had 'passenger' and 'goods' brake settings.

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6 hours ago, keefer said:

That's the photo I think I referenced before, in that it was proof that the solebars/wells were indeed painted blue.

Up until then there had been many discussions but no evidence - as mentioned before, the lower half of the TCVs was so mucky it was impossible to tell and there are hardly any pics of them ex-works in blue.

 

I remember you saying that I did wonder if this was the one that you were referring to as there can't be many published colour pics of these in new condition.

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2 hours ago, BernardTPM said:

The white markings on the corners are because they were suitable for use on train ferries, Note also the anchor in black on the grey.

This is what I was thinking of, from the 1972 General Appendix, Section on Regs. for working the Automatic Air Brake - 'Special Instructions Relating to Continental and British Ferry Vehicles'. Were the TCVs dual braked or vacuum only?

1289944355_IMG_20210824_2029134972.jpg.dff3f71d9c148f0ec594c036d0883087.jpg

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