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Have you tried mixing the paint with some lighter fluid ? I think it is meant to reduce the surface tension off of the pen to help it flow better of that's the problem..

 

JB.

Sorry for the delay in replying. Been away again. Yes, I use for thinning, have done for years. I will try the Humbrol again as that is only thing that has by trying Precision Paints for the lining. Ken

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:D Hi all. Just returned from a week in Florida at our daughters. Well relaxed and spent the w/end finishing the Johnson 1F tank.

 

Well, almost finished. The couplings, crew, coal number plate, works plates and light weathering to do.

 

I added extra detail from what was supplied in the kit. (Of course these could have been missing as I aquired this unstarted on ebay.) It did include wheels and was still £40 below list.

 

Some of the corrections to the etches included lengthening the s/box/boiler/firebox etch by 3mm. Making a new s/box wrapper and riveting it, the supplied one was way too narrow. Adding the 'wooden' backing to the buffer beams and strengthening to the frames.

 

Also added were the tank top support brackets & rear spectacle plate guard irons.

 

Here she is after 2hrs 'running in' on the rolling road.

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Hi all, I was recently asked by a forum menmber how I tackled the 'fingered' flares on tenders.

 

As I am just building a GWR tender for the Manor Classit's an oportunity to show y'all in pictures.

 

I use a quick & simple method to do these. First you neead masking tape, B & Q is fine, 145 solder and a high wattage iron, (mine is 100W)

 

1st image is the 'fingers'

 

2nd is the fingers masked on the OUTSIDE of the flare, then quickly solder the fares filling the 'fingers' as shown on the 3rd image.

 

On the 4th image the tape has been removed. All that is now required is the filing of the flares using various files. I start with the large cours one then the smaller one and finish off the the small fine file before a final burnish with a small fibre brush.

 

The last (5th) image is the files I use.

 

Hope this helps. Total time to do this was under 15 minutes from start to finish. They have not been burnished when the photos were taken. The will wait until ready for painting.

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Sorry for the delay in replying. Been away again. Yes, I use for thinning, have done for years. I will try the Humbrol again as that is only thing that has by trying Precision Paints for the lining. Ken

 

Ken

 

Thinning with lighter fluid gives a nice finish with a brush but I would be concerned about thinning paint for use in a bow pen. I have always found that fresh, well stirred, Humbrol gloss enamel gives the best results. If you thin it with thinners, of any type, it has the tendency to spread out on the surface of the paint and you lose the ability to get a fine sharp edge to the paint line.

 

Sandy

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Thanks Sandy. I only thinned the Humbrol on advice from Bob Moores linning pen instructions and two drops in the tin was all that was required to make it flow in the pen.

 

A bow pen is a different matter and I agree that the paint, thinned will spread out. That is exactly what was appening with the Precision paint I was using in unthinned condition.

 

I have purchased Humbrol, my old favourite, and will try that when I have the time in a busy building schedule to strip the loco and start afresh.

 

Don't get me wrong, the paint job was not THAT bad and I have seen a lot worse. I just want it with clean sharp lines.

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Thanks Sandy. I only thinned the Humbrol on advice from Bob Moores linning pen instructions and two drops in the tin was all that was required to make it flow in the pen.

 

A bow pen is a different matter and I agree that the paint, thinned will spread out. That is exactly what was appening with the Precision paint I was using in unthinned condition.

 

I have purchased Humbrol, my old favourite, and will try that when I have the time in a busy building schedule to strip the loco and start afresh.

 

Don't get me wrong, the paint job was not THAT bad and I have seen a lot worse. I just want it with clean sharp lines.

 

Hi Ken

I have not used the Bob Moor but can imagine that neat Humbrol may be a little thick for it. I have also found that Precision is a lot thinner than Humbrol but I only tend to use it for the main body colours and spray with it. I have not actually tried lining with it and I don't think I'll bother now!

 

Regards

Sandy

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Hi Ken

I have not used the Bob Moor but can imagine that neat Humbrol may be a little thick for it.

 

Actually Bob Moore's lining pen was specifically designed to run neat humbrol enamel to ensure a good colour density on the line. If it's not a fresh tin of humbrol then a couple of drops of lighter fluid to ease the surface tension is recommended.

 

Adrian

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Actually Bob Moore's lining pen was specifically designed to run neat humbrol enamel to ensure a good colour density on the line. If it's not a fresh tin of humbrol then a couple of drops of lighter fluid to ease the surface tension is recommended.

 

Adrian

 

Ken/Adrian

Ian Rathbone, in his book, recommends using linseed oil to thin enamel paint that is 'less than fresh'. I have not tried this yet as my local 'quality' art supplies shop has closed down. Have either of you tried this?

Sandy

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Ken/Adrian

Ian Rathbone, in his book, recommends using linseed oil to thin enamel paint that is 'less than fresh'. I have not tried this yet as my local 'quality' art supplies shop has closed down. Have either of you tried this?

Sandy

 

 

That's a new one on me Sandy.. I have to say I'm seriously considering trying to find a good man at lining to do this for me. I know two guys, one is a bit hit & miss, somestimes really good, othertimes not so good.

 

The other guy is absolutely top notch but has a waiting time of many months & very expensive. My problem is trusting the unknown as I want a nice looking loco at the end of it all.

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Ken/Adrian

Ian Rathbone, in his book, recommends using linseed oil to thin enamel paint that is 'less than fresh'. I have not tried this yet as my local 'quality' art supplies shop has closed down. Have either of you tried this?

Nope - that's a new one to me as well. Lighter fuel works fine for me so I've never tried anything else, as Bob explained it to me the lighter fuel is lowering the surface tension of the paint - it's not intended to thin the paint. The paint does flow nicely using lighter fuel so I've stuck with what works for me.

Adrian

 

 

 

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Hi all. Here we are on a splendid very warm evening with the sun blazing into the work shop (actually it's the rear bedroom)

 

The plates from Guilplates arrived this morning, I've wasted no time in applying them to the Johnson 1F. Install the crew and add the Dinghams and she ready to roll. I finished off the painting with KEEN Acrylic Crystal Clear varnish. This is wonderful stuff, a tad expensive at £15 for a 400ml spray can, but dries in under an hour and very easy to use. Then coated the s/box wrapper/chimney with Railmatch weathered black and a light dusting with Carrs powders.

 

I intend full weathering with the airbrush when I get the Adams Radial finshed and do both together.

 

Also on the WB is this rather nice Scorpio Grange. Now well underway and going together in fine style as is usual with these kits. The firebox required no filing to make it sit right either.

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Hi guys. Cracking on today with the Grange. Now down to the final detailing only.

 

The boiler/smokebox were checked gainst the cast s/box front and the cast joining ring between the two units. A minimal amount of filing of the castings made a nice sung fit when the units were soldered along the joints.

 

As in the photos, I spot soldered the units to the casting from the insides.

 

When ready to attach the boiler/ smokebox to the cast firebox front I use a piece of wire passed through the boiler handrail holes to check all is horizontal.

 

The firebox is bolted to the cab front and the smokebox was drilled and a nut soldered to the the base. This enabled it to be bolted to the footplate. This will, of coures, make painting a doddle.

 

The boiler was attached to the firebox by small holes drilled through the boiler and into the firebcx front casting. 30 thou brass wire was then soldered in and filed flush. This held the boiler unit firmly in place. The boiler band then covered the pins.

 

That's it for today.

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Hello Jazz / Ken,

 

in one of you photo of the Grange you have fitted the internal valve gear, now to my questions, who makes it? Does it work and how much of it can you see. Have you gone to the trouble to make the valve spindles move with it.

At one time I spent a lot of time fitting some to a loco that I had built, only to discover that to see the valve gear you had to have the loco on its roof, now that does not help running.

 

OzzyO.

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Hello Jazz / Ken,

 

in one of you photo of the Grange you have fitted the internal valve gear, now to my questions, who makes it? Does it work and how much of it can you see. Have you gone to the trouble to make the valve spindles move with it.

At one time I spent a lot of time fitting some to a loco that I had built, only to discover that to see the valve gear you had to have the loco on its roof, now that does not help running.

 

OzzyO.

 

Hi OzzyO. Scorpio kits come with dummy valve gear and looks very nice especially when picked out in slightly dirty red.

 

It is designed not to touch the axle so will not affect the running of the model. In fact the axle that the cranks are on is sprung.

 

How much can you see? On some of my Scorpio locos quite a bit at normal viewing. On this loco it is visibla at certain angle so is worth the effort. Some locos it is not worth it as it would be too difficult to see at normal viewing angles so not worth doing IMHO.

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Hi all. Took some time out today to play around with the lining on the Adams Radial. Admittendly, still not up to exhibition standards i on the lining. But I think by the time it has had some subtle weathering it will pass muster on the layout.

 

I guess I will have to practice more and not shy away from lined locos on my layout.

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Looks good to me Jaz.

Bob

Thanks Bob. It it a bit ragged at one or two places (Can be hidden hder a bit of exra dirt/grime)

 

The easiest was the boiler bands. All I had to was a black line on white blank waterslide transfer paper. Then using a new craftnife blade, a cutting matt and steel rule, cut a straight line either side of the black.

 

I found it did not work until I sprayed acrylic varnish over it first. (Crystal Coat varnish as supplied by the transfer paper manufactures.) These papers are designed for PC printer use and the varnish is meant to seal the printer ink.

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Hi all. Took some time out today to play around with the lining on the Adams Radial. Admittendly, still not up to exhibition standards i on the lining. But I think by the time it has had some subtle weathering it will pass muster on the layout.

 

I guess I will have to practice more and not shy away from lined locos on my layout.

 

I think you are selling yourself short! Most of us would give an eye tooth to be able to line that well.

 

Inspirational work - thanks for sharing it.

 

SJ

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post-150-127663228488_thumb.jpgSJ Thanks for your kind comment. I guess I am adicted to striving for the very high standards of the top painters and frustrated when I fail to do so.

 

When you look at this model I built but painted by such a person, you can see what I mean.

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Hi All. Now here is a rare sight leaving my WB, a finished model painted by yours truly and ready for delivery on Monday.

 

This is the Scorpio Grange. Lovely kits, shame one cannot see the inside valve gear. It's kinda nice to know it's there though.

 

I have now change from Railmatch paints to Precision Paints. Much better paint and I am now using my airbrush instaed of the spray cans. It's slower but much better control and easier to get in all the nooks & crannies.

 

She is finished off with Precision satin varnish,again applied with the airbrush.

 

A Ron Chaplin gearbox/Cannon motor makes for a really quiet and smooth runner.

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3.5 lbs, Ken?

 

Ha Ha, not quite, just short of 2lbs. She will be pulling no more than 6 coaches on this guys layout. Albiet a quite large layout at 25' x 30' oval. In fact I am delivering the loco myself and will be spending the afternoon filming some of his 40+ locos I have built for him pounding the layout.

 

This was taken on my last vist, built & painted by yours truly about 14 years ago and still doing stirling work as seen here last summer.

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