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Hi Kev,

I missed that, thanks.

 

Machrihanish aerodrome was a mooring out station and according to Malcome Fife in"British Airship Bases" there is little evidence it was ever used. Some portable airship sheds were proposed but the armistice meant they were not required.

 

The Campbeltown and Machrihanish narrow gauge line ran by but never connected. The aerodrome reverted to farmland shortly after the war.

 

I'll update the main listing when I get home.

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Post 28 has now been updated with the Machrihanish Aerodrome details added.

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Thanks Northroader, I'll take a read.

Construction details for the sheds are relatively scant at present.

 

Current plan is model half of a Coastal shed, these were 300' long with the main shed 150' wide, some had 35' annexes down the sides.

There is some small scale reproductions of plans in "British Airship bases" they are all labelled "Institute of Civil Engineers".

I intend to contact the institute and see If I can some full sized drawings. I might need to enroll some help from the Civil's boys at work.....

 

I also need to workout what sized corrugated sheet was used and how big the standard corrugations are.

I can't believe these huge sheds (the Coastal shed above is one of the smaller sheds!) were built with 8' x 4' sheets.

It seems a bit inefficient.

Edited by Argos
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Hi Argos,

 

National Museums of Scotland may be a source for drawings...

 

This one - a general airfield finder:-

 

http://www.abct.org.uk/airfields/airfield-finder/east-fortune/

 

Includes at least one scale drawing found by following the links.

 

https://canmore.org.uk/search/image?SIMPLE_KEYWORD=East%20Fortune

 

Has more of a similar nature but also implies that there are photo collections that are not accesible online and woould need you to contact direct to see if access can be made available.

 

Thanks

Edited by Scottish Modeller

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I'll apologize in advance as the post below is a bit of a ramble and will wander off topic (no trains....).

 

Over the weekend we took a trip to the Elvington Air Museum near York.

I knew they had some airship memorabilia and was hoping to find out some more information.

 

First up they have a replica BE2a.

This airplane is interesting because the first SS type airships were basically a de-winged BE2a suspended below a standard gas bag.

It is one of these early models I am intending to model so details of the plane will be useful.

 

The aircraft was stored away in an awkward location for photographing. 

Thankfully one of the guides accompanied me into a restricted area to get some better photographs (thanks!)

 

post-13616-0-43681400-1492981365.jpg

 

Outside next to one of the huts was a useful lump of concrete:-

 

post-13616-0-57705300-1492981482.jpg

 

post-13616-0-03090800-1492981511.jpg

 

Other bits of information gathered included a 20lb airship bomb:

 

post-13616-0-59517800-1492981580.jpg

 

and a modelled scene of an SSZ airship:-

 

post-13616-0-59662500-1492981635.jpg

 

This gives a feel for one of the scenes I am aiming for.

I am concerned that the ground crew hanging on to an airship may be a bit animated to be modelled statically.

It is also a bit of a cliche.

I may just have the airship moored to a post instead.

 

Finally was a bit of a shock.

 

An aunt of mine died earlier this year, just short of her 92 birthday. She'd wanted to get to the Elvington museum but sadly had never made it, her mobility wasn't great in her final years.

 

My aunt was a WAAF during the war working a mechanic preparing the planes ready for missions, occasionally working as support aircrew delivering planes to bases around the country.

 

She always told the tale of one such delivery of a Halifax bomber to the Isle of Lewis, as they landed the undercarriage collapsed with a resultant crash landing. 

 

I flew with her a couple of time on normal airline flights. She was always nervous coming in to land until the "thump" of the undercarriage indicated the wheels were down and supporting the plane.

 

At Elvington they have a replica Halifax, rebuilt from various recovered parts.

I was stood in front of the Halifax telling my son my Aunt's story then read the display plaque:-

 

post-13616-0-54903100-1492982318.jpg

 

To say it stopped me in my track was an understatement!

The wreaked plane had lain beside the runway on Lewis for a while before being used by a local farmer as a chicken coop.

Some more investigation is needed to find out if it was indeed my Aunt's plane.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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and a modelled scene of an SSZ airship:-

 

attachicon.gifSS airship model.jpg

 

This gives a feel for one of the scenes I am aiming for.

I am concerned that the ground crew hanging on to an airship may be a bit animated to be modelled statically.

It is also a bit of a cliche.

I may just have the airship moored to a post instead.

 

 

Fascinating.  I must visit.

 

I suspect that may well have been your Aunt's 'plane.  These personal touches really bring the history home, like finding that the Sunderland at Hendon was one of those the Memsahib's grandfather had flown.

 

Now please forgive me as someone with no claim to finescale standards if I have a little poke at those who follow the True Path.

 

I am very much influenced by Iain Rice, from whose writings I have learnt much, and which I have greatly enjoyed. But I do wonder if he takes the aversion to portraying frozen movement too far.  Rice's First Law on frozen movement is do not portray it.  His Second Law is, if you must portray frozen movement, make it minimal, small and hardly noticeable.

 

People are impelled by these concerns to run to extremes. I have seen finescale layouts spookily devoid of any human life.  The existence of people merely suggested, Marie Celeste-like, by some work left half done or an abandoned cup of tea. 

 

If you applied Rice's Laws on Frozen Movement, you could never model a waterfall or a North Country river, as opposed to some sluggish lowland watercourse. You could never model a town, as the constant passage of vehicular and foot traffic would be frozen.  It would be odd if everyone in your town or station forecourt had elected to stand stock-still.  That would be as odd, if not odder, than poses suggesting movement.

 

In other words, the Ricean approach is a luxury for those portraying sparsely populated little backwaters on smallish layouts where nothing very much ever happens, like, err, Mr Rice!

 

Sometimes you need to accept that your subject might be full of movement and concentrate on the most sympathetic way to portray it.  The Ricean answer is no airship.  For 23 hours out of 24, I am sure there would be no airship hovering over the scene.  But where is the fun in that? And half the point of the layout, presumably, is to have an airship, otherwise it's just a lot of corrugated iron?

 

I accept that the ground crew straining at the lines might be a bit too animated, but what about immediately after they have cast off?  A variety of standing poses, looking up at the departing ship.

 

Since the airship has few visibly moving parts, save a propeller, which would be spinning whenever it was airborne (and there are ways to model moving propellers), the frozen motion ban hardly matters. It essentially  just hovers!

 

The Ricean approach to movement goes hand in hand with the views of the Finescale Cameo-Phobes.  Apologies if you are one. Yes, the fire brigade attending a blaze, a wedding party leaving the church (or a funeral), the 'bus on the bridge, the meet of the Hunt (usually set against summer foliage!) are examples of the modeller's cliché.  I beg to suggest that a Great War airship and ground crew is not a cliché!  Rather, it would be a splendid, and possibly unique, set-piece. 

 

I would love to see you re-create such a scene.

Edited by Edwardian
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That's a fantastic story, well worth telling. In the airship diorama, I think they'd need a few more people hanging on to the rope?

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Hi Argos,

 

National Museums of Scotland may be a source for drawings...

 

This one - a general airfield finder:-

 

http://www.abct.org.uk/airfields/airfield-finder/east-fortune/

 

Includes at least one scale drawing found by following the links.

 

https://canmore.org.uk/search/image?SIMPLE_KEYWORD=East%20Fortune

 

Has more of a similar nature but also implies that there are photo collections that are not accesible online and woould need you to contact direct to see if access can be made available.

 

Thanks

 

Thanks Scottish Modeller,

 

That's another archive I need to investigate. Most of the interesting stuff isn't available on line and is quite expensive to order blind (£8.25 per digital image).

I'll see I can find out more about the images.

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Hi Edwardian,

 

I am inclined to agree, one thing I don't like is ghost layouts with no people, something I am keen to avoid, also ensuring all engines have crew and carriages passengers etc.

 

That said, I don't think frozen action scenes model well and I am concerned the landing/take off scene would be obvious and tends towards the cliche (in terms of you would expect to see it rather than " not another airship landing scene.......").

 

I am still giving the scene some thought, I am currently leaning towards having the Airship anchored to a mooring post ready to scramble with more leisurely base activity going on around.

 

There's plenty of time for a change of mind though, as it'll be a few months at least before I get that far.

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Having done some reading last night it would appear that mooring posts where not brought into common use until 1919,so a full ground crew will be required (I need to find a source for these!)

 

In response to Northroaders post above, the amount of ground crew required for the small deridgeables was anything from a dozen or so to upwards of a hundred depending on the wind conditions

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Having done some reading last night it would appear that mooring posts where not brought into common use until 1919,so a full ground crew will be required (I need to find a source for these!)

 

In response to Northroaders post above, the amount of ground crew required for the small deridgeables was anything from a dozen or so to upwards of a hundred depending on the wind conditions

 

I confess, I am not very knowledgeable concerning these uniforms.  A couple of links here: http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/26cd022ab1f542d28fce82354d30349a/royal-navy-air-service-ww1-h4695b.jpg; http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/a9aeba2fad884b08866a9a6d142f4134/rnas-royal-naval-air-service-sailor-in-uniform-fynryw.jpg

 

Andrew Stadden figures would be ideal.  In 4mm there are various Edwardian railway workers (https://www.acstadden.co.uk/product-page/oo7-edwardian-enginemen). The caps are useful. Single breasted coats could be closed with Green Stuff of Milliput etc.  Trousers could be filed to represent puttees. In 2mm, with their head tilted upward, they would be great for ground crew who have just let go of the ropes.  Something going on, but a pleasing lack of animation!.

 

Unfortunately, so far only the first two sets have been released in 2mm (https://www.acstadden.co.uk/shop-1), but I image later sets could be on their way.  In the meantime, some of the working males in Set 2 might be adaptable https://www.acstadden.co.uk/product-page/2mm02-edwardian-people, though they don't look particularly suitable.

 

Andrew Stadden does reply to emails, so you could ask when other sets might be released in 2mm.

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I confess, I am not very knowledgeable concerning these uniforms.  A couple of links here: http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/26cd022ab1f542d28fce82354d30349a/royal-navy-air-service-ww1-h4695b.jpg; http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/a9aeba2fad884b08866a9a6d142f4134/rnas-royal-naval-air-service-sailor-in-uniform-fynryw.jpg

 

Andrew Stadden figures would be ideal.  In 4mm there are various Edwardian railway workers (https://www.acstadden.co.uk/product-page/oo7-edwardian-enginemen). The caps are useful. Single breasted coats could be closed with Green Stuff of Milliput etc.  Trousers could be filed to represent puttees. In 2mm, with their head tilted upward, they would be great for ground crew who have just let go of the ropes.  Something going on, but a pleasing lack of animation!.

 

Unfortunately, so far only the first two sets have been released in 2mm (https://www.acstadden.co.uk/shop-1), but I image later sets could be on their way.  In the meantime, some of the working males in Set 2 might be adaptable https://www.acstadden.co.uk/product-page/2mm02-edwardian-people, though they don't look particularly suitable.

 

Andrew Stadden does reply to emails, so you could ask when other sets might be released in 2mm.

 

Alternatively, you could look at 10mm and 12mm scale wargames ranges, though I don't think either will properly conform to 2mm scale.  I believe 10mm equates to 1/160 and 12mm to 1/144.

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 In 2mm, with their head tilted upward, they would be great for ground crew who have just let go of the ropes.  Something going on, but a pleasing lack of animation!.

 

 

 

Or go for a worried lack of animation for the ground crew who have let go of the ropes and stick the unmanned airship to the ceiling. ;)

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Or go for a worried lack of animation for the ground crew who have let go of the ropes and stick the unmanned airship to the ceiling. ;)

 

Well, you see, though perhaps I am wrong in thinking so, I had imagined that Argos would fix the ship to the backscene via some rod, comme ça:

post-25673-0-60494400-1493113818_thumb.jpg

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Having done some reading last night it would appear that mooring posts where not brought into common use until 1919,so a full ground crew will be required (I need to find a source for these!)

 

In response to Northroaders post above, the amount of ground crew required for the small deridgeables was anything from a dozen or so to upwards of a hundred depending on the wind conditions

Hi Argos,

 

There is another photo showing a mooring point in the Canmore library.

 

It appears to be a lump of granite (or similar) about 3ft square with a ring in it.

 

At East Fortune the approach to where one of the baloon hanngers was has a series of indentations of a similar size spread over about 100ft at about 15ft spacing.

 

Thanks

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Re posted from here http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/121094-nescot-2223-april-2017-epsom-ewell-mrc/&do=findComment&comment=2698938, a detail from the beautifully modelled Lighterman's Yard, showing a clear (but rather brilliant IMHO) infraction of Rice's First Law of Motion:

Actually there's a pipe inside her trouser leg to do that.

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Thanks Edwardian, I hadn't considered 10mm and 12mm figures, looking around there are a few options.

 

on Shapeways there are various 1/144 figures that look like they could be adapted:-

 

https://www.shapeways.com/product/MSTSBN8YF/1-144-german-ground-crew-set-1?optionId=57066810

 

I have a couple of Andrew Stadden's 7mm scale figures. 

If the 2mm ones are as good they will be exquisite.

 

My current plan is to stand the Airship on the mooring ropes hanging down. 

If I use 0.3mm brass wire this scales at just under 2" so shouldn't be too thick, if so I can always use 0.2mm.

With a dozen or so ropes there should be enough to support the airship.

I might also use a couple to carry current up to have a motor spinning the prop.

I'll see if I can squeeze a motor in first!

 

Thanks Scottish Modeller.

 

The mooring post I was thinking of was a single vertical metal post, I think the blocks were used to assist the ground crews rather than acting as anchor blocks.

I need to spend some time wading through my book collection as I assemble the scene.

 

Until then it's back to baseboards.

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The mooring post I was thinking of was a single vertical metal post,

Hi again,

 

OK - I know the sort of post you mean.

 

Some of them were made from rail apparently and set into a post hole with concrete.

 

I've spoken to someone today and the blocks I have described are classed as tethering points and were used to hold the baloon more effectively than the mooring post in bad weather.

 

Thanks

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Thanks Edwardian, I hadn't considered 10mm and 12mm figures, looking around there are a few options.

 

on Shapeways there are various 1/144 figures that look like they could be adapted:-

 

https://www.shapeways.com/product/MSTSBN8YF/1-144-german-ground-crew-set-1?optionId=57066810

 

I have a couple of Andrew Stadden's 7mm scale figures. 

If the 2mm ones are as good they will be exquisite.

 

My current plan is to stand the Airship on the mooring ropes hanging down. 

If I use 0.3mm brass wire this scales at just under 2" so shouldn't be too thick, if so I can always use 0.2mm.

With a dozen or so ropes there should be enough to support the airship.

I might also use a couple to carry current up to have a motor spinning the prop.

I'll see if I can squeeze a motor in first!

 

Thanks Scottish Modeller.

 

The mooring post I was thinking of was a single vertical metal post, I think the blocks were used to assist the ground crews rather than acting as anchor blocks.

I need to spend some time wading through my book collection as I assemble the scene.

 

Until then it's back to baseboards.

 

The Panzer v. Tanks figures seem an excellent choice.  I had not realised they were produced in 1/144 scale, but they have been well-received, and this review of the 1/72nd version of the set should give you more detail: http://www.plasticsoldierreview.com/Review.aspx?id=2486

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Wow, that's some review, looks they need to be bought!

 

I'm not sure how easy the 3D printed figures will be to adapt, hopefully at 2mm scale their won't be too much to adapt.

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I advance of what I hope will be the big board build tomorrow I've printed off the Templot templates:-

 

post-13616-0-69850100-1493543964.jpg

 

Laying them out on the floor gives an indication all is in order.

I probably could have shorten the headshunt at the end of the main loop and created more space in the loops, but I am happy with the overall impression.

 

The 6' x 1' 3" size really feels as though it is on the limit for a single unit and I would like to shorten it, however I feel any further compression would leave the base section looking too cramped and small. 

 

The alternative would be to lose the approach which I feel is important to create the feel of isolation for the base and generate some contrast in the model. Also it will enable shunting to happen "on stage".

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A Challenge within a Challenge.....

 

Or is that an "Opportunity to Excel....." :)

 

As mentioned in an earlier post, apart from the layout build, I also need rolling stock for the layout.

What little 2mm stock I have is for the 1958-64 era and meant for my stalled  boxfile layout Fearnan.

 

This means that all the rolling stock will have to built in parallel with layout build.

I have a train length of an engine plus 6 wagons and a brake van (assuming a tank engine), so If I've 2 engines, that would be 12 wagons plus 2 brake vans, another 6 wagons on the layout being unloaded and one passenger coach and one passenger brake van/parcels van gives 24 items of stock.

 

Conveniently the Cameo Layout Challenge ends May 2019, so in 24 months time.

My target, therefore, is to complete one piece of rolling stock per month.

 

Some items I will attempt to start and finish in the month, other items, such as the locos will be a longer build.

Each month I intend to post up the item I am building that month on the first of the month, there will an associated shot of the item on the last day of the month, hopefully complete!

 

By complete I mean: all painting done, decals/lettering complete, weathering done and couplings fitted so ready to roll.

 

I will cheat! Some items may be partially complete at the start of the month (locos and passenger stock) and some items may be a simple re-wheel if some appropriate R-T-R stock can be found (e.g. coal wagons).

 

As it is the 1st May, this month I shall mostly be modelling a LNWR D88 van.

 

post-13616-0-47667100-1493639775.jpg

 

Photographed with the obligatory small coin for scale.

 

This is a 2mm society kit I've had in the pile for a while.

I intend to finish it in post 1908 livery with diamonds and LNWR lettering.

I'll post build shots alongside the layout build as work progresses.

 

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I advance of what I hope will be the big board build tomorrow I've printed off the Templot templates:-

 

attachicon.giftemplot plans.jpg

 

Laying them out on the floor gives an indication all is in order.

I probably could have shorten the headshunt at the end of the main loop and created more space in the loops, but I am happy with the overall impression.

 

The 6' x 1' 3" size really feels as though it is on the limit for a single unit and I would like to shorten it, however I feel any further compression would leave the base section looking too cramped and small. 

 

The alternative would be to lose the approach which I feel is important to create the feel of isolation for the base and generate some contrast in the model. Also it will enable shunting to happen "on stage".

 

For what it's worth, I think that the approach could make all the difference to the appearance.

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