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chrissixties

South Lambeth Goods Yard - Warehouse

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i've been trying to work out how many tracks went into this warehouse and what the internal platform configuration would have been in this warehouse at South Lambeth. I have the GWR book with some plans and looked at various ariel photos but there seem to be contradictions and I just can't figure it out. Is it just one road towards the back of the warehouse, two together? I would love to know.

 

post-5665-0-55249600-1460750798.jpeg

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looking at 1951 1:1250 OS maps, only seems to have one track going in from the west:

 

http://maps.nls.uk/view/102903175#zoom=3&lat=6179&lon=1959&layers=BT (eastern end)

 

http://maps.nls.uk/view/102902494#zoom=3&lat=5826&lon=6532&layers=BT (western end)

 

also shown on 1916 25in OS map:

 

http://maps.nls.uk/view/103313384#zoom=5&lat=1844&lon=8629&layers=BT

 

1895 1:1056 map unhelpful as the whole site was a water treatment works

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Nice photo on the front of the Pink Floyd Animals album cover.

 

http://i.imgur.com/nok8dOn.jpg

Fantastic lead. Who would have thought prog rock would have held some invaluable answers. I looked through other images connected with the Animals photo shoot on pinkfloyd.com and found an ariel photo that includes the back of the warehouse which I hadn't seen before. It seems to show that the rear was open at the back at ground level where the single track runs through the warehouse.post-5665-0-87847000-1460879650_thumb.jpeg

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Have you seen these ones?

 

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/10/31/1414787228085_Image_galleryImage_August_1936_The_original_.JPG

 

https://www.okadirect.com/Global/Blog/Behind%20The%20Scenes%20at%20BPS/1953%20Battersea%20Power%20Station%20aerial.jpg

 

Found them using a Google search for Battersea power station, rather than the goods yard.

Also never realised the power station was built in stages, just used to seeing the 4 chimneys!

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Blooming fascinating selection of pictures and maps.

 

I read there to be two, closely spaced tracks, on the power station side of the main building, which certainly poses questions about the internal handling arrangements.

 

There weren't turntables and tracks at right angles were there? I'm imagining one track being "in" and the other "out", with turntables being used to get from one to the other, which seems to have been quite a typical arrangement, sometimes with the right-angled tracks extending into bays for particular types of traffic.

 

Then there is the question of "upstairs". In some of these places there were wagon-lifts, in others just goods hoists.

 

K

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Blooming fascinating selection of pictures and maps.

 

I read there to be two, closely spaced tracks, on the power station side of the main building, which certainly poses questions about the internal handling arrangements.

 

There weren't turntables and tracks at right angles were there? I'm imagining one track being "in" and the other "out", with turntables being used to get from one to the other, which seems to have been quite a typical arrangement, sometimes with the right-angled tracks extending into bays for particular types of traffic.

 

Then there is the question of "upstairs". In some of these places there were wagon-lifts, in others just goods hoists.

 

K

 

Kevin neither of the 'new' warehouses at South Lambeth had wagon turntables and i don't think the original shed did either.  According to various plans and photos the 1929 warehouse had two parallel internal railway roads and one external - which was originally partially under the original shed's overall roof thus it had two platforms with cartage access on the other side of one of them.  I think - from drawings and photos that the warehouse shown in the OP probably only had one internal road but photos and drawings are far from clear; it also appeared to have an external road (siding) but again that isn't clear while the other side was definitely for cartage.

 

According to the Wild Swan book most of the warehouse space was rented out and used by various companies to store their products for distribution.  I don't know if any of this was still going on in the 1960s but by that time the depot was mainly regarded as a steel terminal and although I never went there I know it had a lot of the (WR) London Division's heavier carthage fleet allocated at that time including virtually all the Divisional (as opposed to station) allocated heavy tractor units.  Warehousing still went on elsewhere at that time (at Reading there was Danish Bacon, Imperial Tobacco, and some spirits).

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i've been trying to work out how many tracks went into this warehouse and what the internal platform configuration would have been in this warehouse at South Lambeth. I have the GWR book with some plans and looked at various ariel photos but there seem to be contradictions and I just can't figure it out. Is it just one road towards the back of the warehouse, two together? I would love to know.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gifimage.jpeg

I would appreciate it if credit is given when my gallery images are used. Anyone is welcome to use my images so long as they acknowledge the source and respect copywrite. There are more images in my gallery featuring Battersea Power Station and the derelict South Lambeth Goods Depot.

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I would appreciate it if credit is given when my gallery images are used. Anyone is welcome to use my images so long as they acknowledge the source and respect copywrite. There are more images in my gallery featuring Battersea Power Station and the derelict South Lambeth Goods Depot.

I gladly acknowledge your great images. I'm not quite clear how to do this correctly but certainly without photos like yours so many details of history would be lost. Many thanks

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S Lambeth is in the background of some of my photos, some of them can be found with the search  http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/?q=lambeth

 

others are behind the Parrots. http://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/parrot

 

Paul

Thank you Paul - more great clues in some of those backgrounds. Now convinced that the warehouse wasn't open at the rear at ground level from one of your images of a guards van.

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The front and back covers of this book ( http://www.nostalgiacollection.com/book.php?isbn=9781857942057 ) have a couple of views of the yard taken from a high angle, which might be of interest.

Hi Brian. It was this very book and images that first inspired me along with the fact that I then realised that many years later, after the demolition of the warehouse, I used to pass this spot quite regularly without realising what a busy yard it had once been.

Hi Brian. It was this very book and images that first inspired me along with the fact that I then realised that many years later, after the demolition of the warehouse, I used to pass this spot quite regularly without realising what a busy yard it had once been.

Using the georeferenced version of the NLS maps lets you see it all at once, use the slider on the left to fade in and out.

http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=17&lat=51.4810&lon=-0.1446&layers=173

Regards

Thanks for this - even easier

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