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allan downes

Heaton Lodge Junction

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Good Lord, let me be the first to say this is absolutely stunning!

 

Time for the rest of us to pack up!

 

Where/when can we see more?

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Good Lord, let me be the first to say this is absolutely stunning!

 

Time for the rest of us to pack up!

 

Where/when can we see more?

 

Simon's hoping to finish it sometime at the end of next year and, for such a project, that's really going some.

 

Anyway, he intends to keep us updated as and when.

 

Cheers.

 

Allan, riding on the back of Heaton Lodge !

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Thanks for the thread & pictures. It's certainly one I'll be following. As well as the size and detail, the season - winter - will make this special. 

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Simon's hoping to finish it sometime at the end of next year and, for such a project, that's really going some.

 

Anyway, he intends to keep us updated as and when.

 

Cheers.

 

Allan, riding on the back of Heaton Lodge !

Well Allan without your advice and encouragement there is no doubt the project wouldn't have got off the ground as smoothly as it has..

Wait while we get to the two huge bridges over the Calder you built

Edited by HeatonLodge40
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Well Allan without your advice and encouragement there is no doubt the project wouldn't have got off the ground as smoothly as it has..

Wait while we get to the two huge bridges over the Calder you built

 

The only advice I gave was not to let Robinson build the bridges !

 

Seriously though, you've got all the talent needed to carry this out on your own. Sure we discussed  various techniques but who dosen't. It's how all model railways get built, mine included where I copy other people's ideas then claim I invented them ! Robinson's doing it all the time ! Anyway, who was it that was showing me how to make grass stand up and make realistic road surfaces - and who rivetted the bridges !

 

Cheers.

 

Allan

Edited by allan downes

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Looking at the sheer size and length of that cutting it's hard to imagine how the railway navvies of the day cut it all out with not much more than picks,  shovels and wheelbarrows. Even by today's standards and with all the high tech earth moving equipment available it would still be a massive undertaking - then again, why did they need a railway cutting when the surrounding terrain looks quite flat anyway - and what happened to all the spoil ?

 

Thank christ for hot wire cutters aye Simon ! 

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Looking at the sheer size and length of that cutting it's hard to imagine how the railway navvies of the day cut it all out with not much more than picks,  shovels and wheelbarrows. Even by today's standards and with all the high tech earth moving equipment available it would still be a massive undertaking - then again, why did they need a railway cutting when the surrounding terrain looks quite flat anyway - and what happened to all the spoil ?

 

Thank christ for hot wire cutters aye Simon !

I wonder if the cutting was excavated to give spoil for embankments elsewhere, meanwhile easing the gradients a bit. Looking at the area on Google Maps, there seem to be lots of both cuttings and embankments. This looks to be a beautiful model; I hope to get a chance to see it one day.

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Looking at the sheer size and length of that cutting it's hard to imagine how the railway navvies of the day cut it all out with not much more than picks,  shovels and wheelbarrows. Even by today's standards and with all the high tech earth moving equipment available it would still be a massive undertaking - then again, why did they need a railway cutting when the surrounding terrain looks quite flat anyway - and what happened to all the spoil ?

 

Thank christ for hot wire cutters aye Simon ! 

 

It's not that deep a cutting. And it may have been done primarily to provide material for the nearby embankment. (Edit: Brian beat me to it)

Edited by Joseph_Pestell

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Allan - very true about the cutting, the odd thing is the height of the banks seems to have decreased even over the last 30 years. But the work that went into them in the 1840's must have been huge. Originally there were only the two lines of the L&Y the LNWR lines added a few years later.

 

If I'm honest the bank on the North side of the model (where the road is) is a little higher than it should be. But it gives it a bit more drama!

Here's the location in a couple of different era's - in the steam pic the girder bridge taking the New Line to Leeds veers away North. Nowadays the bridge and line has gone of course apart from the first mile or so which is now realigned to make the 1970 junction using the original dive under tunnels..

Both these photo's taken from Woodend Bridge carrying the original access road to Mirfield Shed..

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The length of the four tracks from the bridge to the junction seen in the distance scales to almost exactly 40ft in 7mm. This is where we are now - the junction is being constructed by Norman Saunders as we speak. Then it'll all come to me for the scenery.

What's impressive to me is Norman has even obtained the drawing for the point motors from Westinghouse (-now Siemens) to make a truly accurate model of the motor housing. The junction here features working cranks on the pointwork and the double junction is over 3 boards - 12ft!

I must make an appointment to see my GP for the OCD

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The length of the four tracks from the bridge to the junction seen in the distance scales to almost exactly 40ft in 7mm. This is where we are now - the junction is being constructed by Norman Saunders as we speak. Then it'll all come to me for the scenery.

What's impressive to me is Norman has even obtained the drawing for the point motors from Westinghouse (-now Siemens) to make a truly accurate model of the motor housing. The junction here features working cranks on the pointwork and the double junction is over 3 boards - 12ft!

I must make an appointment to see my GP for the OCD

 

If you think that's impressive he has been making inquiries elsewhere on the 'net about the pattern of switch heaters in use at the time the model is set.  :O 

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One of my favourite pics from the late '60's and before the 1970 remodelling is of a TransPennine DMU about to pass under Woodend Bridge on route to Leeds (courtesy Neil Harvey)

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With all the interest shown, maybe now's the time to reveal a few secrets Simon and in particular how you are building the embankments from scratch. I'm sure your methods will be of the greatest interest and, from what I've seen, quite revolutionary.

 

Cheers.

 

Allan.

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This has really caught the look of a wintery day Allan and Simon! It's shaping up fantastically and I'm looking forward to seeing it!

 

Cheers

 

Tom

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Cheers Allan.

I wouldn't say there's any revolutionary techniques involved but if anyone's interested I'll explain now the materials/techniques to achieve that Wintry rough embankment.

That said, if Heaton Lodge had been modelled in Summer I'd have still used the blend of grass I use. It's easy to fall into the trap of green grass as it rarely actually is. Have to say Giles video's on here about static grass really helped a couple of years ago.

 

However..

 

In the formation of the banks themselves given there is 100 metres it had to be a quick and easy method that gives outstanding result (Allan I took your advice that speed is crucial here).

This bank below from carving the polystyrene to this took less than 1 hour which doesn't include waiting overnight for the ready mix plaster to set..its easy to do and gives great results.

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My banks are simply expanded polystyrene sheets glued with no more nails type glue leaving a square block about 9-12'' high.

It's possible to use the old bread knife but an industrial hot knife that cuts/carves about a metre at a time is a good investment if your layout is large.

Once the banks are carved to shape I use B&Q's ready mixed filler/plaster to coat the entire embankment. Once this is done I'll nab yet more pebbles from the garden path and press into the plaster.

Leave to dry.

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Ah sorry upside down but you get the drift.

The walls are plaster cast from 10 commandments and using a hot glue gun glued straight onto the polystyrene. Then given a wash of dirty grey watercolours.

Doesn't matter if the plaster hasn't fully set next on goes the PVA glue for the grass. I've tried all the static grass glues and to be honest PVA works just as well for me

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Then on with the static grass blend.

I spent literally weeks of using various mixes to get the basic final blend for Heaton Lodge. It's 60% Mini Natur Late Fall 6.5mm and 40% Noch wildegrass beige in 12mm. Mini Natur is tough to get readily in the UK but it's first class stuff. I go to their German website and order in direct..

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Static grass machines..given I'm doing a huge amount I needed a powerful one but that's not to demean the others available. Mine is the RTS Greenkeeper from Germany and it's very good.

On with the blend..

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Now this is the critical stage that lots miss. Either.. Get some soil from the garden, bake it in the oven till dry then crush or sieve it till extra fine. Or get some of Treemendus' earth powder and liberally sprinkle it all over the grass. It immediately gives it that authentic matt look.

Next get the vac out and pass the nozzle close to encourage the grass to stand on end even more.

Almost there now.. Liberally spray Matt varnish all over the grass.

Before it dries I use woodland scenic blended turf earth blend and drop it randomly here and there to mimic weeds.

Finally.. Rough grass is different lengths so to replicate this spray more Matt varnish in random places before going over these patches with the static grass gun again.

Give the whole lot more Matt varnish and we're done.

 

Four foot of embankment not including carving (which is about an hour) and overnight drying time for the plaster is 1 hour and 10 mins.

Beats a grass mat!

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Edited by HeatonLodge40
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Thanks for that Simon, now get off my thread !!

 

Seriously though, a more than welcome masterclass in scenery build up. No faffing about, straight in and at it, all done in just over an hour. The way to go especially when you've got 180 feet of it !

 

Look foreward to more tuition - what you like at cathedrals !

 

Cheers.

 

Allan.

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Thanks for that Simon, now get off my thread !!

 

Seriously though, a more than welcome masterclass in scenery build up. No faffing about, straight in and at it, all done in just over an hour. The way to go especially when you've got 180 feet of it !

 

Look foreward to more tuition - what you like at cathedrals !

 

 

 

Cheers.

Allan.

Cathedrals? I'll leave those to you. Haven't the foggiest mate!

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Me too. - thank you for a first class exposition, on one of the most effective results I've seen...... Everything on this layout 'ties together' so well...

 

A 'bench-mark' layout.

 

Allan, look to your laurels!

Edited by Giles

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