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Heaton Lodge Junction

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4 hours ago, AndrewT said:

From old photos and maps, I knew there were some sidings between the LNWR Huddersfield-Leeds line and the Leeds 'new' Line, as well as a few nearer to the houses at Heaton Lodge itself, but on all the photos I've ever seen - they were empty. Anyone know what their purpose was? I do know that roughly where the arrow-head on the above map is on the RH side after the word 'Leeds' - there was a very small drift mine (actually a bit nearer the (blue) running lines. Might have been something to do with that perhaps?

 

I can't specifically answer your question, but I bought this book at expoEM at Wakefield on 7th September that covers this stretch of the line.

1321223622_TheYorkshireLinesoftheLNWR.jpg.89df4a9f5a225d350567840e0f98c2f8.jpg

 

The book doesn't mention the purpose of the sidings but, in Appendix 5 does say that 'Heaton Lodge Sidings closed on 1st October 1984'.

 

It's an interesting book and well worth the £19.95 cover price IMHO.

 

The Yorkshire Lines of the LNWR, by Neil Fraser and published by The Oakwood Press.

ISBN 978-0-85361-561-3

 

 

 

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On 13/09/2019 at 08:30, AndrewT said:

From old photos and maps, I knew there were some sidings between the LNWR Huddersfield-Leeds line and the Leeds 'new' Line, as well as a few nearer to the houses at Heaton Lodge itself, but on all the photos I've ever seen - they were empty. Anyone know what their purpose was? I do know that roughly where the arrow-head on the above map is on the RH side after the word 'Leeds' - there was a very small drift mine (actually a bit nearer the (blue) running lines. Might have been something to do with that perhaps?

 

I spent about 3 years researching the area around there and found mention of the drift mine - but not the siding nearby. Neither did I find any photos of that part of the line apart from this dreadful one showing an 8F in the background heading west up the Calder Valley line. No siding in evidence here in the early ‘60’s tho they may have been just out of sight..

 

 

7CEA496D-2406-4D08-BA3D-2B5D933C47CE.png

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I did always wonder what this pronounced dip in the cutting just a little further east was too - thought it best to model it anyway.

 

Last year I was reading Paul Bambrick’s book about backscenes when look what I found..a pic of a short train appearing from a siding that cut through to some clay kilns a few yards beyond..the reason for the ‘dip’.

 

Also you can see in the background the bridges of the LNWR Leeds ‘New Line’ that closed in the early ‘60’s.

If you check the printed track plan a few posts back you’ll see where it says 

‘Battyeford’ is where (a few years after closure in 1970) this part of the line was severed and realigned to join the Calder Valley line, which is the track plan in the model of Heaton Lodge itself 

27FB8FA5-8BA3-4A58-B60F-08CB2851ED13.jpeg

11449220-87EE-47A3-A341-A15FFDAB4361.jpeg

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The Old-Maps site shows the drift mine in the 1850s

https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/418468/420530/10/100391

 

But it had gone in the 1890s although Helm Colliery was still shown

https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/418719/420339/12/100392

 

On 13/09/2019 at 13:31, 4630 said:

The book doesn't mention the purpose of the sidings but, in Appendix 5 does say that 'Heaton Lodge Sidings closed on 1st October 1984'.

Is that the closure date of the signal box as the actual sidings appear to have gone some time earlier, possibly mid to late 1970s?

 

2 hours ago, HeatonLodge40 said:

No siding in evidence here in the early ‘60’s tho they may have been just out of sight..

The bracket signal in the centre of the picture was by the exit from the sidings. There's a double disc at the foot of it reading to the headshunt or the running line. The headshunt is the nearest line to the signal box and the sidings disappear into the long grass to the left. 

M946.gif

Thumbnail picture linked from the Signalling Record Society website

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2 hours ago, TheSignalEngineer said:

The Old-Maps site shows the drift mine in the 1850s

https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/418468/420530/10/100391

 

But it had gone in the 1890s although Helm Colliery was still shown

https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/Map/418719/420339/12/100392

 

Is that the closure date of the signal box as the actual sidings appear to have gone some time earlier, possibly mid to late 1970s?

 

The bracket signal in the centre of the picture was by the exit from the sidings. There's a double disc at the foot of it reading to the headshunt or the running line. The headshunt is the nearest line to the signal box and the sidings disappear into the long grass to the left. 

M946.gif

Thumbnail picture linked from the Signalling Record Society website

Thanks for that. Great maps..The signal box defo closed in April 1970 tho 

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7 minutes ago, HeatonLodge40 said:

Thanks for that. Great maps..The signal box defo closed in April 1970 tho 

That would probably mean that the sidings were already disused by then. A lot of small yards like that disappeared in the late 1960s.

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Looking good Simon.

 

keeping my eye every month or so and looks like you’ve been distracted by the fiddle yard!

 

youll have no doubt seen the new proposals from network rail so your model becomes even more symbolic now given the cottages are set for the chop, we’re currently in dialogue with them to understand timescales - sad times!

 

keep up the good work.

 

James (no 3 Heaton lodge)

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15 hours ago, APOLLO said:

Does this map help ?  OS 25" / mile 1892-1914

 

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/index.cfm#zoom=16&lat=53.6786&lon=-1.7105&layers=168&b=1

 

Brit15

 

I tend to use NLS for historic OS rather than the oldmaps web-site which I find a bit clunky, anyway, if on NLS you use the "Find by place" tab in the menu bar a wider range of OS 25" maps will (usually) appear, compared to the Georeferenced Maps (which for the 25" editions is usually just one revision date), see

 

https://maps.nls.uk/geo/find/#zoom=14&lat=53.6732&lon=-1.7137&layers=101&b=1&point=53.6787,-1.7169

 

the maps that can be viewed are in a list on the right hand side of the screen, just click on the one you want to see and it comes up and is scrollable/zoomable etc but not overlaid on modern aerial imagery (as it's not georeferenced).

 

hope that helps.

 

great project btw!

 

I have fond memories of being at the junction back in the early 80s with my friend Richard, who lived locally in Mirfield, a procession of class 40s I seem to recall...

 

cheers,

 

Keith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, James1985 said:

Looking good Simon.

 

keeping my eye every month or so and looks like you’ve been distracted by the fiddle yard!

 

youll have no doubt seen the new proposals from network rail so your model becomes even more symbolic now given the cottages are set for the chop, we’re currently in dialogue with them to understand timescales - sad times!

 

keep up the good work.

 

James (no 3 Heaton lodge)

 

For those following this thread James owns one of the ex signalman’s cottages at Heaton Lodge virtually opposite the ex LNWR footbridge (which I recently built) & which still stands..

 

James - I had no idea your cottage was due the chop, what a crying shame. I’m guessing they are adding more tracks here and electrification too.

I called down to see you just last week as I needed some more pics of the stonework..

You weren’t in so I took them anyway hope you didn’t mind! 

 

Here the model of your cottages take shape ...

I’m on a strict timescale now with Heaton Lodge so couldn’t devote the time to constructing the cottages..

Peter at Kirtley Models has taken it on and by sheer coincidence sent me these pics of them taking shape yesterday..

The photo of the real building show them viewed from the track (ie the rear). The model shows the much more elaborate front view which were built in a gothic style..

 

D701FB1E-C179-405A-936C-A6AB138E876C.png

88C83F34-D369-40CF-B86F-2D08CA6E2B49.png

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5 hours ago, kirtleypete said:

using a photo of the real buildings so it must be right!

 

Pete, 

 

I don’t mean to be critical of your work, the cottages are lovely and will undoubtedly complement this outstanding layout, but Is this really true?  

 

Clearly modern camera sensors are very clever, but their white balance is perhaps not the same as the “mk1 eyeball” whose colour sensitivity changes quite dramatically from time to time (try sleeping in a purple tent, if you want to wake up with weird colour perception!) and the tonal variation produced by the printer will depend on the technology and the inks.  

 

And to further muddy the waters, if the photos of the real thing and the model were taken in different lighting and/or on different cameras, there is likely to be further variation between the perceived colours of them.

 

atb

Simon

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This is a screen cap from Google street view; you wouldn't think it was the same building. 

 

Peter

 

 

HEATON STREET VIEW.jpg

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Hi Pete, 

 

as a layman to the modelling world and meeting Simon by chance at the start of his project,  I can only commend you on the expert work of the Cottages, they are unbelievable. 

 

Whilst not wishing to get involved in the stonework comments (!) i know Simon was modelling from his view of the track in the 1980’s so the stonework would have looked very different back then, but I can attest to the stonework looking different depending on what time of year it is! 

 

I’m looking forward, like everyone else, to see the finished version. 

 

James

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From my own experience the colour of York Stone is very difficult to reproduce.  I've had several goes and failed using all sorts of colours.  It's a sort of khaki yellow but with a green tinge.   As it gets dirty it gets even harder to pinpoint.   A lot of roads were laid in Yorkshire Setts and I have no idea what to do.   

 

Jamie

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2 minutes ago, kirtleypete said:

 

Finally, how do you stop the damn static grass attaching itself to windows?!

 

 

Wait until you've finished using it and then blast the window area with an airbrush airflow. If there is material around that you don't want to blast then just create a paper mask to shield it from the airflow.

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11 hours ago, kirtleypete said:

This is a screen cap from Google street view; you wouldn't think it was the same building. 

 

Peter

 

 

HEATON STREET VIEW.jpg

This in fact is the side I took close ups of the stone work from for you Peter, so clearly the other side has definitely ‘weathered’ more since it faces north.

 

Obviously this side faces south so I guess has been bleached a tad more! My fault for not noticing any difference..

Whatever, the cottages look great! :) 

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4 hours ago, jamie92208 said:

From my own experience the colour of York Stone is very difficult to reproduce.  I've had several goes and failed using all sorts of colours.  It's a sort of khaki yellow but with a green tinge.   As it gets dirty it gets even harder to pinpoint.   A lot of roads were laid in Yorkshire Setts and I have no idea what to do.   

 

Jamie

I too have had this problem Jamie and have used watercolours, emulsions and god knows what else over literally days - it’s almost impossible to recreate.

 

I’d have liked the bridges at Wood Lane (on the model) to look more like York Stone but got away with it to a certain extent as in winter it’s noticeable darker, and often greener and damp. 

If you examine each stone in say this picture of the bridge I mentioned (already modelled) - each individual stone must have 7/8 colours in it. 

 

If anyone has the solution/colour combo please let me know!

89CB8BDF-3F09-46BB-B195-DD41ABFFC4EA.jpeg

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Staying on the stone subject a minute.. 

for texturing this stuff is excellent for getting that rough surface something close. 

Its a powder mixed with water and daubed on using a spatula. I carve the ‘stone’ out of Das once dry then use this on top before painting with watercolours 

4D2E89F8-A42E-4823-BCF2-181DEC5979FD.png

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1 hour ago, HeatonLodge40 said:

Here is Wood Lane bridge again modelled with the above..

B6BA627B-A6D2-4502-92E3-671CB4B91A93.png

 

You aint fooling me, that's the real one with the basement photoshopped in.

 

Mike.

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1 hour ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

You aint fooling me, that's the real one with the basement photoshopped in.

 

Mike.

Thanks Mike the real one has three warning stripes on the girders not four but anyway..!

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That looks like a really useful product, I'd never heard of it. The bridge looks superb, lovely modelling. 

 

Peter

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