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Andy Y

Oxford announce Carflat, additional liveries and sound options.

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It's a nice enough wagon, looks like what it purports to be and with a respectable standard of decoration which will probably please most. I particularly like the bumper irons on the ends and the provision of the 16 wheel chocks. I'm bemused though why undersized wheels were used, it looked very obvious as soon as I took it out of the box. There doesn't seem to be any operational reason for using the 12mm wheels rather than 14mm but it wouldn't be a straightforward swap over as the brakes are closely positioned to the wheels.

 

 

 

 

I suspect that the reason for the undersize wheels is to achieve sufficient vertical movement in the ends of the bogies, to enable the model to be able to go up inclines on layouts, where the inclines are steeper than would occur on the real rail system. The problem they have is that there is a coach underframe which has to have an open moulded top. The top needs to be close to real height, so unlike most rtr coaches, they can't put in a higher coach floor above the bogies, to give more space between the top of the wheels and the coach floor. In coaches, model makers achieve this by having a) raised floors or b) raised floors above the bogies or c) scalloped out floors above the bogies. The floor 

 

By fitting the cam type coupling, they have limited their options, as without it there might have been sufficient space between scale wheels and the moulded deck, if there was no other moulding between. It looks like they had 3 options, assuming the model is designed to be able to work on most types of layout.

 

a) increase the gap between the bogie sideframe tops and the chassis side members, to give vertical play. Probably not acceptable.

 

b) fit the coupling to the bogies, rather than having the cam mechanism within the floor. This might lead to binding with other stock on tight curves, however it is the method Hornby have used on their Mk 1 stock and would probably have been a solution as it would enable the model to have no chassis floor above the bogies, creating a workable gap between the wheels and the underside of the deck moulding.

 

c) fit undersize wheels.

 

Probably both b) and c) would have met the need, the use of cams does allow the model to have better coupling with other makes of bogie passenger stock. 

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Ours had their first outing on Abbotswood at Toddington at the weekend. Here they are heading north behind D84 delivering Ford Transits en route up north...

 

post-7138-0-08453000-1501537350_thumb.jpg

 

Had bought 8 vans to go on 2 wagons but guess what .... they only take 3! So had to buy another wagon - and so now we need another van to complete the load

 

Excellent free running vehicles but oh the weathering....

 

That is Downendian's excellent D6 lurking in the up loop on coke empties

 

Phil

Edited by Phil Bullock
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Can anyone advise about what the prototype is for the Oxford carflat. They had advertised it, when the product was announced, as based on BR Diagram 1/088 in particular the type that used redundant Stanier 60ft coach underframes, however the model seems to measure up as on a 57ft underframe. Purely by chance, in preparation to my last post about the reasons why the bogies have underscale wheels, I was comparing the construction with a Bachmann Stanier 57ft porthole all third and Hornby Stanier Pd 3 57ft brake coaches, and noticed that the length over the headstocks was the same for all three. I compared the carflat chassis length with Bachmann Stanier 60ft portholes and the carflat was noticeably shorter, by about a scale 3ft. Measuring the carflat chassis, I found it was 9 inches over the headstocks, which scales up as 57 ft.

 

Now I'm not sure of prototypes, but were carflats built on 57ft Stanier coach underframes, but it seems that it's not the 60ft type that was originally intended. Does anyone have any info about this. I haven't seen it mentioned in the mag reviews so far published.

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The Carflats used what was available, so there are plenty on LMS 57ft frames, the odd one on 54ft, quite a number on 60ft and a few on 62ft. Quoting diag numbers only gives part of the information as some managed to have frames from different Company origins with the same diagram. See table 13 in Bartlett, P., Larkin, D., Mann, T., Silsbury, R., and Ward, A. (1985) An illustrated history of BR wagons, Volume 1 published by Oxford Publishing Company, 192 pages.Roger Silsbury did a good job of sorting a very complex story.

 

Paul

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First thing I noticed before I even took it out of the box - 12mm wheels! What a shame on an otherwise excellent and beautifully moulded model.

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OK these are MK1 based Motorail Carflats but still interesting to see this close up in Video!

 

 

 

CheersTrailrage

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