Jump to content

pete_mcfarlane

The Locomotives of Boulton's siding

Recommended Posts

... as long as the batteries are fully charged and/or the solar panels, wind farms etc., are working.
 

But no, keep away from that area, I looked at that resource, there's some interesting books on there.

Oh demn ( I must sort my vowels out), that's another few hours gone... 

Edited by Penlan
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

... as long as the batteries are fully charged and/or the solar panels, wind farms etc., are working.

 

Can't have the power go out. If I can't read I might have to do some modelling!!!!

 

Gary

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not Boulton's sidings, but in looking through some photo's of Aberdeen docks*,

I came across this G.N.S.Rly engine here Ooops Timed out so...

 

post-6979-0-96624900-1485087632.jpg

 

If nothing else, an interesting loco to model  :stinker: 

 

* following a lead from Topic Harbour railway at http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/40212-harbour-branches/page-3&do=findComment&comment=2585261

Edited by Penlan
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are also piccies of various locos referred to by Alfred Rosling Bennett and mr Boulton in anecdotes, shall we put those in here for old times sake?

Edited by Killian keane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I like about these topics is they can take you on such wonderful journeys,

to places and photo collections you've never heard of.   :sungum: 

All at the click or more of a mouse button - OK, I'm stuck in the past, but.....

Edited by Penlan
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not Boulton's sidings, but in looking through some photo's of Aberdeen docks*,

I came across this G.N.S.Rly engine here Ooops Timed out so...

 

attachicon.gifGNSR Loco Aberdeen Docks.jpg

 

If nothing else, an interesting loco to model  :stinker: 

 

* following a lead from Topic Harbour railway at http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/40212-harbour-branches/page-3&do=findComment&comment=2585261

It is worth noting that one of the same type of Aveling and Porter locomotive, "Sirapite" is alive and well. It lives on the Leiston Works Railway in Suffolk - see http://lwr.org.uk/gallery/

 

Regards

Chris H

Edited by Metropolitan H

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And, another at Chatham Dockyard, just down the road from where it was built.

 

Although, I think it might now be at quaint on road, standing in for the one that used to work the wotton tramway, which belongs to the LT museum.

 

For a weird breed of locos, quite a few survivors.

 

K

post-26817-0-50953000-1485167492.jpg

Edited by Nearholmer
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And, another at Chatham Dockyard, just down the road from where it was built.

 

Although, I think it might now be at quaint on road, standing in for the one that used to work the wotton tramway, which belongs to the LT museum.

 

For a weird breed of locos, quite a few survivors.

 

K

It wasn't at the dockyard when I visited back in the summer.

 

This is possibly the most interesting surviving Aveling and Porter: http://www.viewing.com/steam/aveling/aveling.htm

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a weird breed of locos, quite a few survivors.

It's a traction engine  :sungum: 

 

Presumably the smokebox door wasn't hinged, but 'released' and then lifted up and away - or dropped down.

Edited by Penlan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed, and that becomes even more obvious with the 2-2-0 version. http://www.bluebell-railway.co.uk/bluebell/pics/blue_circle.html

 

I should have said "weird breed of RAILWAY locomotive".

 

Mr Boulton's "Rattlesnake" was not far removed, and exchanging chains for gears, some of Lewin's also clearly displayed their road locomotive ancestry http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/File:Lewin_1875_01.jpg

 

K

Edited by Nearholmer
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On page 218 the engine 'Brymbo' made from two wagonloads of scrap and various bits and peices is shown (handsome for a bitsa!), this picture shows an evidently elderly locomotive (resembling dolgoch to some extent) for the brymbo ironworks, by its quaint appearance, one might reason that it is either a contemporary or replacement to the engine supplied by Boulton

http://www.gettyimages.ie/detail/news-photo/brymbo-iron-company-0-4-0-tank-locomotive-robertson-order-news-photo/493708084

The keywords on the caption at the bottom of the photo say it's a Beyer Peacock. The Science Museum group now have the BP archives, so it's probably come from there.

 

I've now got hold of the Oakwood Press book of Boulton's SIdings drawings, which also includes a few other non-Boulton industrial locos. There are drawings of similar locos from Fletcher Jennings (hence the resemblance to Dolgoch) and Robey. Fletcher Jennings used a lithograph of their version in their advertising material: http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Fletcher,_Jennings_and_Co

 

This suggests that these open cabbed 0-4-0Ts were a fairly common type at one point in the mid-19th century, with very similar locos from multiple builders. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The keywords on the caption at the bottom of the photo say it's a Beyer Peacock. The Science Museum group now have the BP archives, so it's probably come from there.

 

I've now got hold of the Oakwood Press book of Boulton's SIdings drawings, which also includes a few other non-Boulton industrial locos. There are drawings of similar locos from Fletcher Jennings (hence the resemblance to Dolgoch) and Robey. Fletcher Jennings used a lithograph of their version in their advertising material: http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Fletcher,_Jennings_and_Co

 

This suggests that these open cabbed 0-4-0Ts were a fairly common type at one point in the mid-19th century, with very similar locos from multiple builders.

I wonder whether those records would provide information on some of boultons more obscure engines mentioned towards the end of the book, as I recall beyer peacock bought nearly all of what was left of the sidings assets, most memorably fowlers ghost
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The keywords on the caption at the bottom of the photo say it's a Beyer Peacock. The Science Museum group now have the BP archives, so it's probably come from there.

 

I've now got hold of the Oakwood Press book of Boulton's SIdings drawings, which also includes a few other non-Boulton industrial locos. There are drawings of similar locos from Fletcher Jennings (hence the resemblance to Dolgoch) and Robey. Fletcher Jennings used a lithograph of their version in their advertising material: http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Fletcher,_Jennings_and_Co

 

This suggests that these open cabbed 0-4-0Ts were a fairly common type at one point in the mid-19th century, with very similar locos from multiple builders.

I've just noticed there is another loco in the background, I cant really make out details though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just noticed there is another loco in the background, I cant really make out details though

It looks like an outside cylinder 2-4-0 tender engine, minus the tender. I may be seeing things, but it looks like there's a semicircular brass makers plate on the leading splasher, which suggests another Beyer Peacock loco. If the 'works in the background' is the BP factory at Gorton, then it may not even be a loco intended for overseas.  

 

There's also a wooden bodied coal hopper next to it, of a type I've not seen before (not the traditional 'cauldron', or the NER type).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bit late for this, but I suspect the hopper wagon is MS&L. The company had some, and there is a drawing in Coal Trade Wagons by L.Tavender, page 15. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The engine 'Lewin' listed under miscellaneous locomotives is on the cover of the book 'stephen lewin and the poole foundry', there might be a photo inside (I havent got myself a copy yet) I adore this loco and am seriously thinking of doing a 16mm live steam version https://gardenrails.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=10952&sid=bee308561ec0b4e98bedb219f845cd79

Edited by Killian keane
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stephen Lewin locos have a peculiar charm, what with their odd valve gear arrangements. Some of the standard gauge ones have the eccentrics between the wheels and the frames as well as being connected to the non-driving axle.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, charming little fellows arent they! The fletcher jennings patent locos (i.e Dolgoch) have the eccentrics on the non driving axle, and the Edward Borrows well tanks have their eccentrics between the wheels and frames, but never on the same loco! The lewin chimneys seem a little unceremonious but the flambouyant style of the domes makes up for that

Edited by Killian keane
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Judging by the photos, the Lewin at Beamish also has the valve gear between wheels and frame, although both are driven off the same axle. 

http://beamishtransportonline.co.uk/2014/02/no-18-lewin-miscellany/

 

And then there's this....

http://laxeyminerailway.im/original-rolling-stock/

 

And almost inevitably Swanscombe Cement Works had one, in their collection of weird narrow gauge locos (with outside flanges onthe wheels). 

http://www.irsociety.co.uk/Archives/36/Letters_36.htm

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And almost inevitably Swanscombe Cement Works had one, in their collection of weird narrow gauge locos (with outside flanges onthe wheels). 

http://www.irsociety.co.uk/Archives/36/Letters_36.htm

I might be missing something here, but it seems there is no connection between the driven rear wheel and the front one that presumable links to the valve gear...

Or do I need to go to, you know where  :O

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I might be missing something here, but it seems there is no connection between the driven rear wheel and the front one that presumable links to the valve gear...

Or do I need to go to, you know where  :O

The connecting rods seem to be at the bottom, covered i much so they bled in with the ground. It's a scan of a magazine copy of probably not very good photo to begin with, so it's hard to make out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you   :imsohappy: 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a photo of 'Dwarf' on Ebay at the moment:

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/142363868820?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

 

Anyone fancy doing that in P4? The wheel/crosshead clearances would be fun........

 

The seller has one of 'Ariadne', the converted Sturrock steam tender, as well but I've seen that photo before. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.