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pete_mcfarlane

The Locomotives of Boulton's siding

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described as having 1x17 inch cylinders.

 

Somewhat underpowered, but the boiler will be able to supply more than enough steam...

It also has unevenly spaced wheels (greater space between leading and central axle than leading and rear) and has the old E.B. Wilson style of fluted safety valve cover, which indicates an Old Class I

I have been trying to identify it by works number.

 

177 of 1865 SHAKESPEARE (St. Albans) Contract details as above. Sold to T.B. Crampton, Kineton, 1866

 

Sister 178 was an Old Class I.

Also appearing elsewhere on the web.

It later went to Selsey Tramway as Morous.

Edited by Regularity

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So does this mean you're building three of his locos in addition to Sharpie no.11? You work fast!

Not intentionally. I've had the Manning kit for a while and never made the Boulton connection until now but I am doing the 2-4-0T Eclipse, which is definitely being built in Boulton's rebuilt condition.

 

Somewhat underpowered, but the boiler will be able to supply more than enough steam...

Sister 178 was an Old Class I.

Also appearing elsewhere on the web.

It later went to Selsey Tramway as Morous.

Interesting... That one has the flared bunker, which also steps onto the rear buffer beam. The drawing in the book shows a loco with the plain bunker that finishes short of the buffer beam. The one that went to Australia has the plain bunker but stepped on to the buffer beam. The photo in Harman's book shows MALVERN with the same style of bunker as in the drawing in The Chronicles.

 

Was the style of buffer beam a progressive change that can be dated, I wonder? Or was it not dependent on when the loco was built? More photos of known Old Class I are needed to compare.

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4 of 1859 RUTLAND (Great Malvern) W&HR Worcester to Hereford, 1859. LNWR Enniskillen to Bundoran 1864-66. Sold to LNWR 1866

 

I think that should be the Irish North Western Railway and not the LNWR. Interesting that a standard gauge contractors loco was converted to Irish gauge.

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My build of LEODIS, from the RT Models kit, is progressing. Leodis, for those who don't know, is an old form of spelling for the city of Leeds.

post-494-0-65613900-1514325268.jpg

Edited by Ruston
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Mr Rosling Bennett was a very interesting person himself.His day job was promoting early telegraph and later telephone systems which were the forerunners of today's BT system.

One of them was in Edinburgh and while there he organised an Exhibition of Railway Locomotives to mark the opening of the Forth Bridge.The locos included a Webb compound (Jeannie Deans) and a Stirling single which came close to losing its chimney at the road bridge at St Margarets!

I wrote an Article about him which appeared in a Railway World Annual about 1985.His work brought him into contact with the Postmaster General who was Cecil Raikes of the Mersey Railway and the Tank engine named for whom still exists in Liverpool

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I thought - whooo, nice MW kit, lets have a look at RT Models range.

The next one on their list is this :

 

post-6979-0-72760600-1514720917.jpg

 

Question (First obvious one), 'How do they open the smokebox door?'

 

On the K's Hudswell Clarke 0-4-0T I have, and I'm assuming this is how the kit came some decades ago, the buffer beam is dropped and the coupling is near the top - thus the door can be opened.
The third photo shows the 1:1 scale 'Lord Mayor' and how that coupling chain is attached.

Of course I'm assuming they didn't open the door a bit and then lift the door upwards off the side hinges.

 

post-6979-0-96804900-1514721428_thumb.jpg

 

post-6979-0-85186400-1514721411.jpg

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manning wardles had that same dip in the bufferbeam or the doors were D shaped to open upwards like on Ruston's above

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manning wardles had that same dip in the bufferbeam or the doors were D shaped to open upwards like on Ruston's above

I agree, re the top hinged ones.  I'm just sad that in manufacturing the kit, a little thought hadn't gone into the other front beams.

I saw one of these at NEC this year with the circular door and straight top beam, on asking the owner re the front plank, the owner's reply was "That's how the kit came".

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Heres Henry Hughes 'Liverpool', an engine not illustrated in the book, I would suggest that by this point she had been given a larger saddle tank, this one dosen't look consistent with Hughes early type to me

locomotive-liverpool1.jpg

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I found this old picture of Leodis at a car boot sale.

post-494-0-79796500-1517769158.jpg

 

OK, so I lied. :beee:

 

post-494-0-12201100-1517769261.jpg

 

post-494-0-24881700-1517769290.jpg

 

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I found this old picture of Leodis at a car boot sale.

attachicon.gifLeodisold.jpg

 

OK, so I lied. :beee:

 

attachicon.gifMWI-Leodis01.jpg

 

attachicon.gifMWI-Leodis02.jpg

Scrolling through and my first impression was that you had found the model at a boot sale...

 

Lucky ****** I thought, I never find interesting stuff!

 

Then it clicked.

 

:senile:

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So two down, every other loco in the book to go?! :D

Lovely model, Mr Knowles would be proud of the livery

Who is Mr. Knowles?

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Who is Mr. Knowles?

As Pete says he was Boulton's painter (who would actually paint engines in a tall hat and frock coat!) he did some marvellous work "employing different shades to produce different artistic effects" even painting 'Bristol' in something very like LBSCR marsh livery about 40 years before it was applied to lbscr locos!

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I agree, re the top hinged ones. I'm just sad that in manufacturing the kit, a little thought hadn't gone into the other front beams.

I saw one of these at NEC this year with the circular door and straight top beam, on asking the owner re the front plank, the owner's reply was "That's how the kit came".

"that's how old class I and k's was built"

 

A lot of research has been carried out into these 2 designs of locos.

 

https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sharpthorn_at_Horsted_Keynes_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1449615.jpg

Preserved class k, no dip in bufferbeam

 

http://www.warwickshirerailways.com/lms/smjsa175.htm

Old class I, became morous and one of the variants the kit is designed to build, no dip in bufferbeam

 

http://www.railwayarchive.org.uk/Lpages/html/L2563.html

Class k, slight dip in bufferbeam

 

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/f/fort_brockhurst/fort_Brockhurst_alsop(1903)old3.jpg

Old class I, no dip in bufferbeam, stove pipe chimney though.

Edited by RThompson

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I'm looking for Boulton's siding on old maps with a view to establishing the track plan, I think I may have established the location and general arrangement here but no chance of discerning the track plan from this 1885 map

post-29975-0-22622100-1522090955_thumb.png

Edited by Killian keane
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I'm looking for Boulton's siding on old maps with a view to establishing the track plan, I think I may have established the location and general arrangement here but no chance of discerning the track plan from this 1885 map

That looks to be a different place than I thought it was. http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/112757-the-locomotives-of-boultons-siding/?p=2967052

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If its the site of the gas engine works you're likely right, the trouble is finding the same location in the 1860s/70s, I'll look again but I don't recall seeing any sidings there on the 1891 map

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