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On 02/12/2020 at 07:25, simontaylor484 said:

Shaun

The work gets better and better detailed. I cant think of the words to describe it.

Sir you are a true Miniaturist

 

 

Hi Simon. Thank you. The modeling doesn't always go well as you will see. It's very encouraging  to receive such positive feedback and yours came at just the right moment.


Regards Shaun

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Making rooves has never been a strong point of my modeling with many failures over the years.

Dunster's goods shed roof and the textile mill are two that spring to mind. I used Slaters slate sheets first time around on the goods shed roof which curled up something chronic.  The mill roof failed too.

Alas my first attempt at a roof for the waiting rooms is awful. It took ages too.

 

A rethink is needed and any advice is most welcome!

DSCF1728.JPG.5c5e04c0db241bd468ac2207a0f2834a.JPG

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2 hours ago, Sasquatch said:

Hi Simon. Thank you. The modeling doesn't always go well as you will see. It's very encouraging  to receive such positive feedback and yours came at just the right moment.


Regards Shaun

Things in real life rarely do Shaun

Glad I could help in a little way

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3 hours ago, Sasquatch said:

Making rooves has never been a strong point of my modeling with many failures over the years.

Dunster's goods shed roof and the textile mill are two that spring to mind. I used Slaters slate sheets first time around on the goods shed roof which curled up something chronic.  The mill roof failed too.

Alas my first attempt at a roof for the waiting rooms is awful. It took ages too.

 

A rethink is needed and any advice is most welcome!

DSCF1728.JPG.5c5e04c0db241bd468ac2207a0f2834a.JPG

 

I'm no expert at modelling tiles {truthfully not expert at much else either} - but, that rack of, unpainted, tiles looks really good for the era.  Granted it does risk being amongst the collection of Mary Berry's Saggy Bottoms.  Perhaps that might not be a feature that has reached across the "Pond" yet - perhaps it has?  Anyway bracing winds are best resisted by well braced tiles.  Maybe it might be worthwhile to invert the tiles ( no pictures please, there may be sensitive minds viewing these posts} and applying such bracing woodwork as may be viewed in various lofts.  Such a structure could be sliced to size, without the gory detail, and returned to the acceptable viewpoint, for the admiration of the grimy masses - and youngsters alike.

 

J

 

 

 

 

 

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I must admit the roof looks ok, but you feel it is not.  I have not done any roofs yet, but @Jason T did on his Bacup layout, and he printed out what you have done, then cut the tile strips separately, then half cut each tile, finally layering them as you would a real roof.  I am not sure what he had as the base.  York models do precut sticky strips.  I have bought some but have not used them yet.  (Usual disclaimer.)

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Hi Shaun, as you say not all modelling runs smoothly, and a look in my rubbish bin would be proof of that. For roofs I use a base of 2mm grey board braced with triangles of the same grey board. this makes a very solid structure to glue to. This method was used for Westerham and Brasted Station roofs they were then covered with Slaters Plasticard Slate. At the moment I am building a roof for a Warehouse and I am using the same method but this time covering it with Scalescenes slate paper applied in strips seems to work well. All the Best Adrian 

roof 1.JPG

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Have you seen these?

 

tiles

 

I haven't used them but the O Gauge version has been used on a very large engine shed  model in the Leeds MRS CIO. They are just placed on a plasticard base and look very good..

 

Baz

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Thank you for taking the trouble to give advice chaps. 

 

The goal is to come up with a low cost fast method of making 4mm slate roofing. Firstly then I need thicker-stronger structures, also these should be made up before the slates are attached.

 

Another option if I'm to put any money into this, is to create an RV rubber mould large enough to make any roof I might need for warehouses etc. and cast my own from plaster or  resin.  

I like this idea because sanding becomes possible.

 

There is one other method which I have had some success with and that is the foam board method, quite tedious but strong  and effective.

These are my foam board slates, made for the Cheshire Lines warehouse.

1605464861_roof(1).JPG.86ec38f73c40265a848ba6f026b487da.JPG

 

1550543618_roof(2).JPG.b75a650cbe693ccf5cbce62f98fcf6c7.JPG

 

1393610725_roof(4).JPG.8117dd9909b3ed7f93d3a93057406b04.JPG

 

This is the second roof for Dunster's goods shed. Wills sheets which are great for smaller rooves but difficult to join convincingly for larger structures.   Can also workout expensive and wasteful. If I had used these on the Cheshire Lines goods warehouse the cost would have been another thirty quid.

522566439_roof(3).JPG.0a3f09f6c3fd99f1158c1c5e11a129e0.JPG

 

Lastly these are Plastruct shingles. Not great at all. Way too small and not easy to stick down.

1071907583_roof(5).JPG.5a62e2a2c60aa6a53b02ab9e46cf1d7f.JPG

 

I'll have another go at it later today.

 

Regards Shaun

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So I'm going to try all the above methods, one of each and will assess how I get on.

 

First up is the foam board type.

I could have used better quality, this type is hard to find, it's my favorite for scribing and has thick paper which has great texture for painting but after making this roof I find it isn't easy to make small neat cuts in.

 

Cut and marked out the piece of board...

1583835890_newroof(1).JPG.b0c9859f0032ba45b4aaa7a182ef096a.JPG

 

 

... scored lines through the paper then using this pointy tool bent the courses in.

820110527_newroof(2).JPG.2b2d93e2bc986fc78cb6928165c3b0a1.JPG

 

 

Next the tedious bit. All the slates are cut carefully with a new Stanley blade. The first row on the lines then the next between the lines etc. etc.

1217369121_newroof(5).JPG.1d33ed25508867f9a679ef90a5a0fcd1.JPG

 

I scored through the back with my depth cutter and trimmed and sanded the bevels.

1359438236_newroof(9).JPG.2ef5c6678a586977e1b68ad669d39785.JPG

 

437244278_newroof(8).JPG.bba86f5ab351257f734ab67ebd4d917a.JPG

 

 

A run of glue and tape to hold it.

1362929738_newroof(7).JPG.38645041e11763a4f1d0044702b8ed31.JPG

 

 

Mixed and applied slate grey acrylics.

1060795950_newroof(6).JPG.52c932478ee4932c48377d8759c36a1f.JPG

 

Time taken 1hour 25 minutes.

Cost about 10cents.

Satisfaction 9/10.

Results. Looks good at middle distance. Still needs gutters, bargeboards and weathering. 

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Here's the second method.

Stout card construction.

931332101_longroof(1).JPG.dc2d902edc8cc0b1c59e47dcfb314af3.JPG

 

I cut 10mm wide strips of very thin card, taped them to up in bundles of 6 and cut them at 4mm spacing.

211875037_longroof(2).JPG.d1f4b2fbc93fd9b73abe0ad6b6162809.JPG

 

The roof had been pre-marked at 5mm to line up the rows of slates.

This time I used the non toxic super glue.

1562819282_longroof(3).JPG.e219a44852a9fe663563d3de0342d632.JPG

 

Coat of paint.

875048063_longroof(5).JPG.3d76850a6d48c0f167294a7674d86256.JPG

 

Time: most of the evening.

cost (this one) Nothing.

satisfaction 10/10.

Results. A little heavy looking but a good strong structure.

473855491_longroof(4).JPG.497dbd50322e1a125647cdeab4d601e4.JPG

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Sasquatch said:

Here's the second method.

Stout card construction.

931332101_longroof(1).JPG.dc2d902edc8cc0b1c59e47dcfb314af3.JPG

 

I cut 10mm wide strips of very thin card, taped them to up in bundles of 6 and cut them at 4mm spacing.

211875037_longroof(2).JPG.d1f4b2fbc93fd9b73abe0ad6b6162809.JPG

 

The roof had been pre-marked at 5mm to line up the rows of slates.

This time I used the non toxic super glue.

1562819282_longroof(3).JPG.e219a44852a9fe663563d3de0342d632.JPG

 

Coat of paint.

875048063_longroof(5).JPG.3d76850a6d48c0f167294a7674d86256.JPG

 

Time: most of the evening.

cost (this one) Nothing.

satisfaction 10/10.

Results. A little heavy looking but a good strong structure.

473855491_longroof(4).JPG.497dbd50322e1a125647cdeab4d601e4.JPG

 

 

I prefer this one.

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13 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

I prefer this one.

Agree!

However I did have trouble lining up the rows and am not prepared to spend so long making rooves (or is that roofs).

126626225_slates(1).JPG.57b0a746e2a0cdf59318b704dae9efe2.JPG

 

So having gained some experience I've come up with a quicker and better method.

 

The foam board ones were straight although a little untidy the knifing out of all those slates was just within my capabilities and unconvincing because the vertical cuts aren't at all perfect.

1024667995_slates(3).JPG.7500362c985821a07fbd564898afcbfc.JPG

 

Foam board is also prone to surface damage and the corners can break off.

1106314412_slates(2).JPG.3d0da70cef80e55aea4dfa10c944fe0c.JPG

 

The revelation came when I realized that to get them straight I needed to mark a whole sheet with 4mm lines.

I can't cut that so scribed it in with a fine black ballpoint.

So I made a small sample and this time reverted to PVA glue which gives a slightly longer working time.

2125043126_slates(5).JPG.6a877697f09b8bf590d537d27f74e1de.JPG

 

Here's all three for comparison. 

1381532358_slates(4).JPG.81e09021bc3535a6ac71f5b6bbacb671.JPG

 

Regards Shaun.

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Top...  tidy newish...

 

Bottom left poor Devon / Cornwall workmanship...

 

Bottom right good work ravaged by climate and time...

 

Pay's yer money, takes yer choice.

 

No pressure then...

 

Julian

 

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2 hours ago, jcredfer said:

Top...  tidy newish...

 

Bottom left poor Devon / Cornwall workmanship...

 

Bottom right good work ravaged by climate and time...

 

Pay's yer money, takes yer choice.

 

No pressure then...

 

Julian

 

You might be on to something there Julian...

...but please don't plant ideas of "Wes' Coun'ry Fa'mouse Cheesy" Layouts in my head because I might just quit on all this hard labor and go back to modeling Crowcombe Heathfield.

Nice cozy quaint little GWR branch line modeling through which one can run virtually anything!

It's also designed to fit in the cozy attic where one could spend hours playing trains hiding from killer viruses!

 

All the best my friend,

Shaun

 

 

Edited by Sasquatch
Spelled crowcombe without the B
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6 hours ago, bigwordsmith said:

If you look at an older slate roof you'll see the slates are very irregular  - its the best way to tell a fake slate roof from a real one - the fake ones are all uniform

Yes, I took that into account when I did the last sample.

Compared to the building the rooves on the real thing looked to be in rather good condition!

That might not work for the models though!

480244889_waitingroomslates.jpg.e126c08ac30e8dfad0112d0d928c21da.jpg

 

Regards Shaun

Edited by Sasquatch
Forgot attatchment
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Finally. Found some more thin card and cut a whole bundle of scribed slate strips.

Then realizing that I hadn't made up all the buildings put one together, furnished it, made up the thick card stock roof and added all the slates. Made it to bed at a reasonable time too.

937775735_Finalslates(1).JPG.0490534f898c620e653e13b091cb04cb.JPG

 

913731189_Finalslates(2).JPG.516bd8176226a520ff87f5a7398d77de.JPG

 

One thing I did change was to revert back to the non-toxic super glue but fixed the slates to the frame in shorter strips which also gives the chance to add a loose slate here and there. (So cheating really). 

1022462495_Finalslates(4).JPG.9d39f8bd0f14765c6bcb9118bcd4b9aa.JPG

 

2057843766_Finalslates(5).JPG.78799eee00f1988a467c382961b85438.JPG

 

1211245799_Finalslates(3).JPG.23f4f47fea4383a5fdcc32ac9461fa3b.JPG

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9 hours ago, westerhamstation said:

Hi Shaun, that method has turned out very well and, worth the effort you have put into it. All the Best Adrian.

Hi Adrian.

Thanks! Yes I'm finally happy with the production time and the end result. Proficiency is one thing but discipline is still lacking!

Much got done yesterday. All the buildings are together and furnished, well nearly. Can you believe I've actually run out of benches!

 

Regards Shaun

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20 hours ago, Sasquatch said:

                                         Just noticed that I'm in  5 figures :sungum::sungum::sungum::sungum::sungum:

Thank you all for all the great feed back.

It's due to the massive support YOU give to others Shaun.:good:

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  • Sasquatch changed the title to Goathland & Grim-up-North...FLOCKAGING ALERT!!!

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