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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, manna said:

G'Day Sasquatch.

 

Finally worked out why my pictures weren't  being resized, they were, but going to my 'Pictures' instead of My Documents, Doah !. So here's a pic of the new scratchbuilt chassis, also one of the new J7 chassis. (There's also a J5 chassis being built as well.

 

manna

DSCF5699.jpg

DSCF5696.jpg

Those look really good, solid too. What motors do you use mate?

 

I've got a DJH A8 for Goathland in my kit box and a Wills etched chassis to go in an old Airfix 4F. It's my intention to save the loco building until the layout is done though. I figured that might be a good thing to take up in my 60s!

 

Regards Shaun.

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G'day Shaun

 

Most of the motors I use are Mitsumi ( or something like that), the smaller ones are $5 or 10 for 5, the bigger ones are $2 each, all of the ones I bought have been good, quiet and strong enough for me, the gears are Hornby, easy to get, cheap(ish) and easy to mesh.

 

The only way at the moment to get stuff off the SD card is to put it into the video camera ( it has a cord, that fits the Computer)

 

manna

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8 hours ago, manna said:

Finally worked out why my pictures weren't  being resized, they were, but going to my 'Pictures' instead of My Documents, Doah !.

‘Bin there, done that!  You’d be surprised how many times I’ve had to resort to doing a second resize just so as I could see exactly where they were being stored. . .

Paul.

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Set your desktop as default for everything then just drag it to what ever folder you wish! I can honestly say I have never lost a picture this way but did loose a whole USB device once!

 

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Posted (edited)

The carpentry on the new board is finished. Today I made legs to my proven design, they just slot in underneath and the only improvement I came up with was to screw the board supports onto the pairs of legs instead of glue and pinning them, this will allow for adjustment!!!

DSCF2133.JPG.35b6b0044ff6cf863bb780d9b21e24c4.JPG

 

There's some fancy stuff where the legs fit in at the narrow end. The only largish chunk of wood I could find turned out to be maple which is rather hard for a soft wood. The part had to be planed out, cross cut and mitered at 36½° cross grain. Not an easy cut. Another small piece of ply was stuck to this as the leg retainer. 

DSCF2134.JPG.4245d59b05777d8618031acd1410f51b.JPG

 

 

I also had to run the abbey section through the table saw to allow trains to pass beneath now that there is a new track configuration.

DSCF2138.JPG.7210e94722c233e6c3c9f5cf573dfd42.JPG

 

 

The center rib is removable so as to allow access to the tracks at the back. Quite a lot of foam insulation sheets will be needed to make up the hill.

DSCF2135.JPG.070d2444cd3b8a7efc9bf0f78e565db1.JPG

 

 

All the different levels are evident here...

DSCF2137.JPG.7f580e5ce62f622adbce935085d4d112.JPG

 

Talking of track, this morning I made up the scissor crossing. I managed to get the track centers down to 70mm without too much surgery. All I did was to stagger the rail joints. The medium radius  point has been curved to suit not that it shows in the picture. This junction will allow switching the down lines (clockwise) to either one large inverted figure 8 or two independent circuits.

DSCF2130.JPG.c9d03c5d2edebb30bbd33a434fb9204a.JPG

 

 

Seeing as I have three capacitor discharge units I have come up with a simple idea to wire pairs of point motors on different CDUs so that one switch will throw all four turnouts. Luckily there will be no need for complicated wiring of frogs if four rail breaks are introduced at the places marked.   

DSCF2132.JPG.77f53c54165af89569e8f289ad00ea7b.JPG

 

Hopefully I'll find some more time to work on this tomorrow.

 

Squatch.

 

 

Edited by Sasquatch
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Modeling has ground to a halt I'm afraid. No doubt things will resume shortly but it is nice to have the dining table back.

I did manage to set up the new section in the train building and Goathland looks more complete with it's abbey and tunnel back in place. Cork has also been laid ready for track installation. After much research  on mini-split systems I think it's time to just get on and order one before the money gets spent on less important stuff. (Taken a fancy to Hornby's new A2s). :nono:

 

We also took down 3 cypress trees that had suffered from too many Oregon winters. These were behind the garage brushing up against the rear wall and were a big fire hazard. One of this years big jobs here this year is to repaint as much of the buildings as we can. That includes the garage, another reason to take out the three trees.

 

Sorry no images to share but I will make up for it next time.

 

Regards Shaun. 

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G'Day Shaun

 

Funny you should say your painting your buildings, I'm doing the same (that's why, no updates) weathers been perfect for it, had weeks of 27c, but it's about to change. My neck and shoulders are killing me, time for a day off.

 

I was saying a post the other week, that I've had a great run with Mitsumi motors, well the one in the J5 failed after I'd got the chassis running, had to dismantle much of the chassis to replace it, slowly putting it back together.

 

manna

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3 hours ago, manna said:

G'Day Shaun

 

Funny you should say your painting your buildings, I'm doing the same (that's why, no updates) weathers been perfect for it, had weeks of 27c, but it's about to change. My neck and shoulders are killing me, time for a day off.

 

I was saying a post the other week, that I've had a great run with Mitsumi motors, well the one in the J5 failed after I'd got the chassis running, had to dismantle much of the chassis to replace it, slowly putting it back together.

 

manna

Hi Manna mate.

 

Good to have nice weather, makes you want to get on with projects. So far all we have managed on the painting front is some prep work on the front deck ceiling. Mrs S. painted the new addition (bedroom) last year. Two days ago I took down the old chicken run we never used, to salvage the chicken wire but all the wood was really rotten. I need to have a big burn up and a dump run to complete that project but today we're dealing with a blocked septic pipe. Nasty business!

 

Much rather wish I was putting motors in something. Might just settle with repainting a Hornby Railroad range Mallard passenger blue and renaming it Sir Nigel Gresley for Goathland. My First attempt was a tender drive version. The paint looks fantastic but it runs like a sack of spuds, at least I was savvy enough to save the fox transfers until after I'd tried rebuilding it.

 

Regards Shaun.

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11 hours ago, Sasquatch said:

Hi Manna mate.

 

Good to have nice weather, makes you want to get on with projects. So far all we have managed on the painting front is some prep work on the front deck ceiling. Mrs S. painted the new addition (bedroom) last year. Two days ago I took down the old chicken run we never used, to salvage the chicken wire but all the wood was really rotten. I need to have a big burn up and a dump run to complete that project but today we're dealing with a blocked septic pipe. Nasty business!

 

Much rather wish I was putting motors in something. Might just settle with repainting a Hornby Railroad range Mallard passenger blue and renaming it Sir Nigel Gresley for Goathland. My First attempt was a tender drive version. The paint looks fantastic but it runs like a sack of spuds, at least I was savvy enough to save the fox transfers until after I'd tried rebuilding it.

 

Regards Shaun.

As an inhabitant of a tied cottage for 20 years, I know septic systems.
The cottage was perfect, the Coop a good employer.
The septic system fatally flawed, until I provided photographic evidence of the blockage.:lol:
You have my sympathy in dealing with your problem.
Regards,
Chris.

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On 02/04/2021 at 05:26, Sasquatch said:

 

 

There's some fancy stuff where the legs fit in at the narrow end. The only largish chunk of wood I could find turned out to be maple which is rather hard for a soft wood. The part had to be planed out, cross cut and mitered at 36½° cross grain. Not an easy cut. Another small piece of ply was stuck to this as the leg retainer. 

 

Hi,

I thought that maple, even the varieties that are often labelled soft, was actually a hardwood?

 

Roja

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4 hours ago, Sandhole said:

As an inhabitant of a tied cottage for 20 years, I know septic systems.
The cottage was perfect, the Coop a good employer.
The septic system fatally flawed, until I provided photographic evidence of the blockage.:lol:
You have my sympathy in dealing with your problem.
Regards,
Chris.

Hi Chris.

 

We made the detrimental mistake of switching to Costco septic friendly bog roll which It obviously isn't because it floats! Eventually the inlet blocked but I'll spare you the details of yesterdays events :wacko:

 

Regards Shaun.

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2 hours ago, 37Oban said:

Hi,

I thought that maple, even the varieties that are often labelled soft, was actually a hardwood?

 

Roja

Hi Roja.

 

Very confusing about wood. Hard to believe but balsa is a hardwood!

An English journeyman will say that if it comes from the tropics it's called hard on account of the lack of growth rings.

The American definition is quite different saying that  hardwood comes from angiosperms (flowering plants)  such as oak, maple, or walnut, that are not monocots and that softwood comes from gymnosperm trees.

 

To save confusion in future I should use the term dense!

 

I spent two years working for a small very meticulous furniture reproduction company. Some of the woods we used I'd never heard of before nor have been able to track them down since such as fustic (poor mans oak) and gurria which looks like bastard mahogany but has a distinct nasty sweet smell when drilled. We also used afromosia a lot. My favorite wood to work with, it was used on yew furniture and overlaid with yew veneers crossgrain! I would run my jack plane the full length of a door and take the tightly rolled shaving home to my toddler who would blow them like a party popper!

 

It just so happens that there is a piece of their furniture for sale on eBay at present.  At $1,595.00 it's a bargain!!!

March22pics2021-396.jpg.891bbe16a747684451faa603559f29f8.jpg

Regards Shaun

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The septic guy had the right tools and was done in a few minutes. Nice chap, full of advise on how to avoid problems in the future and how I could improve the system in a few hours with a shovel and a better connection  for a few bucks. In hindsight I realize that's what I could have done. Costco are to blame though, because he also said most of the blockages he has to deal with are caused by their supposedly septic friendly  toilet paper. So much for stocking up last year. Gonna have trouble shifting it too! Oh that reminds me...

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4 hours ago, Sasquatch said:

It just so happens that there is a piece of their furniture for sale on eBay at present. 

 

That's bloody gorgeous mate. I love it.

 

Al.

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G'Day Folks

 

Well you know what to do with Costco loo paper, after use, put it in a bag, and when you have enough, either burn it or, take it back to Costco, and dump it in one of there rubbish bins.  :yahoo: We do that when away in the Caravan.

 

manna

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1 hour ago, Alister_G said:

 

That's bloody gorgeous mate. I love it.

 

Al.

Hi Al.

I wrote to the eBay seller and asked if he would check and see who's initials were stamped on it. He got back to me pretty quick and said. "R R" overlaid. Not mine but I think it was Winkies. Manor House Reproductions cabinet shop was one of those old school places where we all wore grey work coats, had pencils in every pocket and behind both ears! I learnt a lot there and never had trouble getting cabinet making positions after they had to let me go. They didn't last long after that, mind you there stuff was very expensive. We did a one off extra tall, 5 door, break fronted version of that in walnut for an American customer. It took over a month to put together and the price tag was more than a years wages!

 

I can still do it in my barn but it's a lot of chance these days finding customers! No one wants repro. anymore. I can do modern as well though. missionary was in vogue a few years ago when I made this desk for a friend of my father-in-law's, it's all hand dovetailed no screws or pins!

776.JPG.deb28f6644eac88c7623e1bc6868a045.JPG

 

Regards Shaun.

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, manna said:

G'Day Folks

 

Well you know what to do with Costco loo paper, after use, put it in a bag, and when you have enough, either burn it or, take it back to Costco, and dump it in one of there rubbish bins.  :yahoo: We do that when away in the Caravan.

 

manna

Deserves a round of applause that mate.  I'm going to take the bog rolls back to costco and demand a refund and present them with my drain unblocking bill! they wouldn't get away with mislabeling their products in the UK!

In fact I should walk in there with 40 gallons of septic tank crust and demand a refund for that too and see how we get on!

Edited by Sasquatch
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Here's all I've accomplished this week with the layout. No cabinet making what so ever unless that might include two window surrounds.

 

Platforms on Queensbury are of two types wood and stone. The stone ones have been made by making paper templates which have bee spray mounted onto three quarter ply and cut on the band saw.

They still need some work and will be dressed in Plastistruct O gauge stone and painted before installation.

DSCF2139.JPG.e02c33006b12488e1341ee4d368ab6b0.JPG

 

DSCF2150.JPG.23f1c17906310b49684a254a07ce17c5.JPG

 

 

 

Taken from outside the garage through the window is a picture showing a mock-up of the castle and hill with it's relation to the abbey and tunnel.

DSCF2144.JPG.ffdb7b5b49939cdffebb76710622dbc9.JPG

 

I also took  a couple of the Whitby end of Goathland ...

Station extension, gents and weigh bridge office.

DSCF2148.JPG.9e4deea75ec90fad408a4bd76482cdd0.JPG

 

 

This is the cutting leading down to the tunnel under the Halifax end of Queensbury.

DSCF2145.JPG.5f0a936b44f322cb18a1b5588e377cd0.JPG

 

To rap things up, two trains with the latest stock.

V2 4808 The Green Howards in Darlington green with the newly finished teak stock.

Just how I like a train to look.

DSCF2143.JPG.9b9f958b1b71d774e7d5147ca8157c11.JPG

 

Lastly K3 4006 on a Whitby bound train with that nice new BCK at the head

DSCF2141.JPG.516ec34b3f2dd4176be24b99bcde9dea.JPG

 

Regards Shaun.

 

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On 09/04/2021 at 17:22, Sasquatch said:

Hi Roja.

 

Very confusing about wood. Hard to believe but balsa is a hardwood!

An English journeyman will say that if it comes from the tropics it's called hard on account of the lack of growth rings.

The American definition is quite different saying that  hardwood comes from angiosperms (flowering plants)  such as oak, maple, or walnut, that are not monocots and that softwood comes from gymnosperm trees.

 

To save confusion in future I should use the term dense!

 

I spent two years working for a small very meticulous furniture reproduction company. Some of the woods we used I'd never heard of before nor have been able to track them down since such as fustic (poor mans oak) and gurria which looks like bastard mahogany but has a distinct nasty sweet smell when drilled. We also used afromosia a lot. My favorite wood to work with, it was used on yew furniture and overlaid with yew veneers crossgrain! I would run my jack plane the full length of a door and take the tightly rolled shaving home to my toddler who would blow them like a party popper!

 

It just so happens that there is a piece of their furniture for sale on eBay at present.  At $1,595.00 it's a bargain!!!

March22pics2021-396.jpg.891bbe16a747684451faa603559f29f8.jpg

Regards Shaun

Hi Shaun,

the distinction between hard and soft woods sometimes seems to defy logic!  I've never heard of fustic, gurria or afromosia, but then again, I was once a butcher, not in the cabinet trade. English oak can be incredibly hard if well seasoned.  One day my father came across a piece at the back of a pile of wood his father had stored in a shed "in case it was useful!"  He had no idea where it had come from, or how long it had been there, decades at least, but he thought it would make a great post to repair a gap in the fence around our orchard.  A hole was dug and it was placed in position.  After much hammering, half a dozen bent staples and a lot of sweating it was pulled out of the hole and chucked to the back of the pile with only small marks to show for it's adventure!

 

Roja

 

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54 minutes ago, 37Oban said:

Hi Shaun,

the distinction between hard and soft woods sometimes seems to defy logic!  I've never heard of fustic, gurria or afromosia, but then again, I was once a butcher, not in the cabinet trade. English oak can be incredibly hard if well seasoned.  One day my father came across a piece at the back of a pile of wood his father had stored in a shed "in case it was useful!"  He had no idea where it had come from, or how long it had been there, decades at least, but he thought it would make a great post to repair a gap in the fence around our orchard.  A hole was dug and it was placed in position.  After much hammering, half a dozen bent staples and a lot of sweating it was pulled out of the hole and chucked to the back of the pile with only small marks to show for it's adventure!

 

Roja

 

 

I lived for several years in the Old Courthouse in the middle of Castle Combe, which had been there since Henry VIII had it built.  The ceiling / upper floors were all oak and the ends of the beams overhung the road slightly.  Ideal locations for hanging flower-baskets, I thought, just need to drill some pilot holes in the end grain and screw in some brass hooks.  It didn't take at all long.....   for the end of the 6mm drill bit to melt into a blob.  So, flower-pots then, screwed into the ground, amazing what some of the many visitors thought would be placed around for them to take home, as a memento.

 

Julian

 

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Posted (edited)

Not done much work with English oak but do have one story which will divide the ranks.

After the great storm of 87 Jaycee Furniture acquired some oak from a very old tree that suffered damage from the 100mph winds. This tree was planted by King James 1st. in Stammer park. Jaycee Furniture had the Queens award to industry and as a thank you to her majesty made a one off carver chair with the royal arms of England (1603-1707) carved into the back and red leather upholstery in the Jacobean style. My part in the production of this chair was to distress it, or make the wood look like it was 400 years old. To my knowledge it resides in Buckingham palace. So there, Squatch. maker of fine models and cabinet maker to her majesty Queen Elizabeth  II.

 

Edited by Sasquatch
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1 hour ago, Sasquatch said:

Not done much work with English oak but do have one story which will divide the ranks.

After the great storm of 87 Jaycee Furniture acquired some oak from a very old tree that suffered damage from the 100mph winds. This tree was planted by King James 1st. in Stammer park. Jaycee Furniture had the Queens award to industry and as a thank you to her majesty made a one off carver chair with the royal arms of England (1603-1707) carved into the back and red leather upholstery in the Jacobean style. My part in the production of this chair was to distress it, or make the wood look like it was 400 years old. To my knowledge it resides in Buckingham palace. So there, Squatch. maker of fine models and cabinet weatherer to her majesty Queen Elizabeth  II.

 

.....   Well it must have looked fine, until they let you polish it.....   still, a fine accolade, nonetheless.   :jester::jester::jester:

 

J

I really have to find one of those Anderson things, for the garden.

 

Edited by jcredfer
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Posted (edited)

Believe it or not I actually got a bit of work done today. This involved getting under the layout far too many times to attach the new board to the end of Goathland and to the long thin loops board behind that. Four coach bolts and a more than a bit of jiggery pokery than I care to admit seemed to do the trick.

DSCF2151.JPG.e66dcad8beedaf0c60a6f6256abdbd62.JPG

 

The adjustable idea on the legs paid dividends too. Instead of just poking an unsightly shim under the foot of the leg (as has been the norm), I used the shim between the support and bottom of the baseboard edge thus.

DSCF2152.JPG.9fa771f331dbf215df2701250d65eb43.JPG

 

 

I then inserted a screw through the back of the leg into the baseboard (not seen here) enabling the shim to be removed and the support repositioned uptight against the baseboard. Then removed the screw from the inside. Simple but effective!

DSCF2154.JPG.61d7c2bade44c013d42d72f9661a257b.JPG

 

 

That done I brought in some heavy equipment to glue and staple down the cork underlay. My pnew neumatic  stapler is a god send!

DSCF2160.JPG.8060c383f6cfbaca18a12ca6dd913cf4.JPG

 

Postie then arrived with a parcel from Liverpool so i naturally got distracted for a bit and had to get a picture of the new proverbial bus on the bridge.

DSCF2159.JPG.1b74737b9eb7cac4efb9bb1e6cfae6f5.JPG

 

Just love the colour of "The Green Howards".

DSCF2155.JPG.23f2700b23db9605559644c03e5f41bf.JPG

 

 

Those Gresley V2 prairies have just got to be one of the most pleasing looking steamers ever built.

DSCF2156.JPG.06693aeafeced37c073e4b208d81ff62.JPG

 

Great long evening shadows.

DSCF2158.JPG.08a404ad3352f503e2fa450a444bcaa8.JPG

 

Squatch.

 

 

Edited by Sasquatch
pigery jokery
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  • 2 weeks later...

If we can get past the data storage  configuration issue I've got a real treat for you today.

 

 

 

It's been all out due to great weather here in Oregon. The warehouse has started to receive attention on the outside ready for its much needed repaint. I prefer to call it a make-over and you'll see why in due course. I have still not purchased a heating/cooling system for two reasons. One, is that my credit card was blocked and I'm still deciding what kind of system to get. Am leaning toward a self contained unit in lieu of saving lots of money on installation costs.

DSCF2171.JPG.2322fe0d73e4239017c9b21223c4f578.JPG

 

The platforms are coming along slowly. I originally made these from 3/4" ply but realized they need to be an inch thick so added a 5mm thick piece of MDF to each section. Not as easy as it sounds. The stone work is being added with O scale rough brick embossed plastic sheet. I should be able to get these finished today paint and all.

DSCF2170.JPG.d867324451e40bb2542f9380ebbb1c8e.JPG

 

 

And lastly a flockaging alert. 

DSCF2168.JPG.b9cb358a1b91f3f93a22db2706e5f3bc.JPG

 

About 90% of the ground cover has been appiled. Nice!

It's a totally different view.

DSCF2167.JPG.d871a7f544a507f52521c58ab6fe238d.JPG

 

J94 with a solitary ballast brake van crosses the bridal tunnel on route from Keighley to Halifax.

DSCF2169.JPG.f995996364f9972cf096bc35dee072ac.JPG

 

Regards Shaun.

 

 

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  • Sasquatch changed the title to Goathland & Grim-up-North...FLOCKAGING ALERT!!!

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