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Goathland & Grim-up-North...Queensbury Flockaging alert.

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3 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Forsythia?

Always good see.  In fact it's nice to see them; to see them, nice.

 

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7 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Forsythia?

 

3 hours ago, teaky said:

Always good see.  In fact it's nice to see them; to see them, nice.

 

Yes I modeled two of them but You don't get anything for a pair, not in this game!

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Here's the difference sunlight makes. I might just have to model the living room interior too.

I plan on making the fences to finish off that scene and starting Willow Hall Farm across the road today. Don't expect the usual farm model of tractors, live stock and shed full of die-cast farm equipment though.  DSCF1083.JPG.23187cad13568e990a4ceb6c888d98e1.JPG

Shaun

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13 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Forsythia?

Bless you my Son.:P

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Just a post of Willow Hall Farm today.

 

This picture was taken after closure. The stone pier just left of the name board is where the foot bridge once connected the station to the road.

There's plenty of junk behind the farm.

2020374270_QUEENSBURY2020STATION202020Ex20G_20N_20R_20c1965_jpg.jpg.031862c7a89953337214a302fc3e5394.jpg

 

This google earth view is from 2002 and shows someone had a proclivity for broken vehicles.  

whf2002.jpg.c8ba7767ccbcef9cd92064e8b37ff2ae.jpg

 

 

Last year looks a bit tidier and far less over grown.

whf4.jpg.26af4fe0555f24f177fee67143a859ae.jpg

 

Taken from the bottom of Station Road.

whf3.jpg.7c062a5e0f85fa30be933421a4ccf142.jpg

 

The model I built a couple of years ago now.

I built it to HO scale hoping to create some depth to the layout which I now wish I hadn't.

923936324_WillowHallFarmhouse..JPG.b0d259d3cda209727b1bb44e34bd80c5.JPG

 

Lastly a side view with the type of West Riding atmosphere I aim to recreate.

whf2.jpg.1f8aa196c1992e42f80b61f3ee7c5af5.jpg

So much moss!

 

Hopefully I'll get some more modeling in later but someone is pulling at my mojo.

 

Shaun.

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Willow Hall Farm.

This was a real fun project today. This week during my spare time I rummaged through several boxes of stuff and scrap to put together a half decent farmyard scene. It's a bit overgrown, full of the kind of junk people save and has just two dogs who are after something in the wood pile.

2079959197_WillowHallFarm(2).JPG.ea6c1051ff1c93e24e7d389a12971d80.JPG

637820367_WillowHallFarm(4).JPG.2dfcfd0cb73162cbcf3250e19dce4eb2.JPG

 

Not having any pictures from the 40s or 50s to work from I have chosen to model the corner on Station Road a bit like it is today.

832989189_WillowHallFarm(1).JPG.72093f41441480d5a82b4cb9d1fcdddc.JPG

There's a new wall behind with out buildings and brambles behind that. I adjusted the ground level raising it up about 20mm to make that wall work better.

903011677_WillowHallFarm(6).JPG.81c12a4e44bbcc37793c5015b1f69a49.JPG

 

299777745_WillowHallFarm(3).JPG.0d456aca98a0774ed0809ba7755c1ebc.JPG1301757571_WillowHallFarm(5).JPG.77010a5dfa88964cc1e23660b96e3961.JPG

 

The last picture shows what I have incorporated at the other end and this still needs all the undergrowth and detailing added.

500128362_WillowHallFarm(7).JPG.7e7937ba4c5712792b30df7a127a1d6c.JPG

 

Hope that you're keeping out of trouble.

 

Regards Shaun. 

 

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Great stuff - you are using your time very well!

 

Me on the other hand . . . 

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I know you are in that rather spacious country Unlimited Space Available {most of which, between the POTUS ears}, but the rest of us have had to invent a virus pandemic for an excuse to get quite so involved in modelling.  Quite how you have managed to convince Mrs Sas that you have to stay inside to avoid the nearest person, {how many MILES away} and must be sheltered in the layout barn, to avoid contagion.  ...  Bows down in respect...

 

Like the progress, too - keeps the forehead to the floor, total respect!

 

Julian

 

{HOW!!.....  }

 

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On 21/04/2020 at 23:01, Bogie said:

Great stuff - you are using your time very well!

 

That's not strictly true. With all the layout jobs that need doing in order to get the trains running, I seem to have got side tracked into modeling junk! All I managed yesterday was a broken down lorry. 

5 hours ago, jcredfer said:

I know you are in that rather spacious country Unlimited Space Available {most of which, between the POTUS ears}, but the rest of us have had to invent a virus pandemic for an excuse to get quite so involved in modelling.  Quite how you have managed to convince Mrs Sas that you have to stay inside to avoid the nearest person, {how many MILES away} and must be sheltered in the layout barn, to avoid contagion.  ...  Bows down in respect...

 

Like the progress, too - keeps the forehead to the floor, total respect!

 

Julian

 

{HOW}...

 

Please get up and stop groveling. We have been using the time to help clear the forest fire fuel, which is exhausting work (not to mention getting neck deep in poison oak itch itch. Moan moan.

So we are happy to take a few days well earned break relaxing, doing what we love best!

 

Yesterdays model from the depths of the scrap boxes is a decommissioned funfair generator truck.

These generators were built to power searchlights during WWII. and most found use afterwards to power fair ground rides. When the lorries failed the generators carried on and found employment by land owners to power various equipment such as pumps. I think if I had one today I would be selling power back to the grid!

 

91179245_Funfairgeneratormatador(3).JPG.14c9da86244e9e0046ffcbe152b8cd01.JPG

 

All from the scrap box, I pulled the radiator off first, then fashioned together an engine from bits and made the fan from a punched disc of .010 placticard.

1524705271_Funfairgeneratormatador(1).JPG.049566f8f7834b9c07fc6dcf130dcfdc.JPG

 

The generator casing is actually an HO kit which I cut the doors off one side and hashed up a diesel engine from such bits as coupling mounts, sprure feed and laddering.

174955757_Funfairgeneratormatador(2).JPG.99040e3fd410e50c5c3cc19af31d1024.JPG

A nice dull coat of barn red to finish off. it sits on some panzer wheel rims. All it needs is a bit of rust, some glazing and some weeds around it.

I'm gonna have to face the ballasting work at some point soon.

Shaun 

 

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Posted (edited)

Even more scrap from the scrap boxes this evening.

 

A slurry spreader appropriately finished in a nice shade of red-brown.

1880590329_Slurryspeader(1).JPG.6625e5f037a78ae6892d06970598148b.JPG

1200824603_Slurryspeader(2).JPG.fcb264e0136ce4bca133ee95014e610d.JPG

 

 

And a crane cab. This came from a Pola Urban renovation project kit. I dispensed with the ugly chassis,  loaded it with many various scrap parts and made some doors from thin plastic.

317956048_Craneunit(1).JPG.375b54793ed7f5b70477c8e15f45a742.JPG

Mrs. Squatch is disappointed I painted it Wedgwood green but I think it shows up the rust better. It's the perfect colour for it.

831548239_Craneunit(2).JPG.3b38ad9de19851b530df994adc71de63.JPG

 

I wonder if the last owner fitted it with panzerkampfwagen IV duel mufflers?

808779478_Craneunit(3).JPG.152d6d1e308995992dbd35086dd14f94.JPG

 

It's all gonna look great littering up the field behind Willow Hall Farm.

Much better than cows. Every one does cows!

Squatch

Edited by Sasquatch
Moooooo
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Morning Shaun! 

 

Great bit  of modelling (as ever). The rust effects you have achieved on the crane cab look spot on. I have tried many different methods, from salt through powders and paints to even include watercolour pencils. 

 

May I ask your technique? 

 

Stay safe, 

 

John 

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5 hours ago, 380John said:

Morning Shaun! 

 

Great bit  of modelling (as ever). The rust effects you have achieved on the crane cab look spot on. I have tried many different methods, from salt through powders and paints to even include watercolour pencils. 

 

May I ask your technique? 

 

Stay safe, 

 

John 

Hi John.

I discovered it quite by accident. I use weathering powders (three shades) and have a small pallet to mix the shades up with thinner. Just a small brush load mind. There is also a couple of dedicated brushes for the job

Dab the mix on by building it up. Light shades are younger so start with a big patch of light, add the medium inside in a smaller patch and a dab of the dark one in the middle. 

The crane however had it's door left open to the elements which were never given a good coat of paint (if any) so I just used lots of dark rust. The cab has had a dusting of medium powders without the thinners.

 

Regards Shaun. 

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1 hour ago, Sasquatch said:

Hi John.

I discovered it quite by accident. I use weathering powders (three shades) and have a small pallet to mix the shades up with thinner. Just a small brush load mind. There is also a couple of dedicated brushes for the job

Dab the mix on by building it up. Light shades are younger so start with a big patch of light, add the medium inside in a smaller patch and a dab of the dark one in the middle. 

The crane however had it's door left open to the elements which were never given a good coat of paint (if any) so I just used lots of dark rust. The cab has had a dusting of medium powders without the thinners.

 

Regards Shaun. 

Champion Shaun, 

 

Thank you very much for the explanation. 

 

All the very best, 

 

John 

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What a week it's been here. 78F and everything is growing fast as a result. Since fixing the mower on Saturday we have cut the grass twice.

Anyway between all the chores I did find time to work on the lift off scenic section which is now almost finished.:sungum:

 

These trees are plastic armatures bent to shape, sprayed with hairspray to hold the sparse bits of polyfiber. Dark brown camouflage paint from a rattle can, more hairspray,  and dipped in a tub of Woodland Scenics  medium green course scatter and a bit more hairspray. I still need to paint moss onto the trunks. A dead tree helps the scene by adding a bit of decay.

1546743668_Queensburyscenics(2).JPG.d8e333667a72f4f07b5fa4168934c78d.JPG

 

 

Brambles and general undergrowth are done the same as the trees but the dark brown polyclumpus are pinned to the under-brush-decay-mix  (which is a tub of all the vacuumed up spillage and Noch brown flockagedinguns). Yet more AquaNet odourless and on with two shades of course flockages.

 

 

Edwin Chedahands opening the throttle on his LI series 2 up station road in the days before helmets. 

96696387_Queensburyscenics(3).JPG.ee9025f78e709637c0560163443e6f04.JPG

 

View from the bottom of the goods access road.

1316214257_Queensburyscenics(5).JPG.2342bcc62202197ed05b466e9be32bbb.JPG

 

 

Looking up the farm track in front of the station masters.

484826326_Queensburyscenics(4).JPG.5c12b3070748719f94fdf0801ccf2c25.JPG

 

 

...and with the signal box.

2109250939_Queensburyscenics(1).JPG.32ebb75259d882ce2b9e3eee12ce329b.JPG

 

Farm junk is just visible on the right. Just a bit more work needed here too.

DSCF1118.JPG.e9f1d42940b8f13b0f5831170ec2500e.JPG

 

Hope that you're all safe and well

Regards Squatch

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The fence went in this morning and I grabbed the camera because the light looked interesting.

DSCF1135.JPG.2533d8ffddbd15f20d744dd329ce6d2f.JPG

DSCF1134.JPG.b00f9f5b7ff74dfdaeb4cdcf8ee12698.JPG

DSCF1136.JPG.0d7d93b43d97cc41876332773c4a83b4.JPG

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Posted (edited)

Step by step time.nerd.png.dc15c919dc48638bdcff647b53269ef9.png

 

One of the advantages of foam board scenery is that stuff can be poked into it and removed and is ideal for the Sasquatch patent fence method.43663172_Squatchicon.png.f3232a7052f34ed419ede3ec4996477b.png

 

When I built Dunster we made match stick line side fences and employed beading wires.

Now I needed a fence for the station masters house on Queensbury, I set about making some from scratch.

Firstly I ripped some maple to 1.5 x 1.5mm on my table saw using a zero tolerance insert and cut lengths of 45mm on my band saw also using a scrap of MDF for zero tolerance.

232520238_Beadingwirefences(1).JPG.412b0bb148123646c1083a23d86d1e43.JPG

 

1.5mm² is about as small as can be ripped and drilled which comes out at a scale four and a half inches square.

Next I drilled a 7/64” (2.8mm) hole into the end of a scrap of wood as straight as possible about 25mm deep. I then marked and drilled three 0.5mm holes thus.

507412309_Beadingwirefences(2).JPG.8367c86a11f8bd47ea457af0454ef653.JPG

Inserting the thin maple posts into the large hole allows each post to be drilled with a mini drill. More than one attempt at getting the jig perfect was necessary.

1732457814_Beadingwirefences(3).JPG.38b792e36d0e6cd952feb3ffad162f4a.JPG

The drilled posts were dipped in a weathering solution and allowed to dry.

1046910240_Beadingwirefences(4).JPG.042ff417552d8356c022eae3796468db.JPG

2099457796_Beadingwirefences(5).JPG.d3eac6c00fd9eb5b2a82cd764bcb46ad.JPG

 

This picture shows the tools needed to assemble the fence.

1521906952_Beadingwirefences(6).JPG.8bc6cde9a2a33dcb35e1e74c2afba8f2.JPG

 

A suitable length spacer was cut and holes made at equal intervals with a reamer.

edit: The use of a reamer does two things. Stops the foam from collapsing and helps keep the post true to the vertical!

510645964_Beadingwirefences(7).JPG.8a54412f9bff657c8dd07570eae55da9.JPG

The posts were trimmed to a point with a Stanley blade and set into the holes. A scrap of plastic tubing cut to 18mm was slipped over each post before setting to a scale 4’6”.

Lastly the fun bit.

Knots were tied in the ends of three lengths of 0.3mm beading wire and these threaded through the holes in the posts.

The wire is pulled taught and held with the cross lock tweezers. Zap-A-Gap Cyano. is applied to every other post. This super glue has a capillary action which draws the glue into the holes.

Just needs weathering.

2123712175_Beadingwirefences(8).JPG.012bae9f8949d27619eb2b00fa6a1cb0.JPG

Edited by Sasquatch
Missed a detail.
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That looks bloomin excellent Shaun, very smart indeed.:good:

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1 hour ago, Sasquatch said:

Step by step time.nerd.png.dc15c919dc48638bdcff647b53269ef9.png

 

One of the advantages of foam board scenery is that stuff can be poked into it and removed and is ideal for the Sasquatch patent fence method.43663172_Squatchicon.png.f3232a7052f34ed419ede3ec4996477b.png

 

When I built Dunster we made match stick line side fences and employed beading wires.

Now I needed a fence for the station masters house on Queensbury, I set about making some from scratch.

Firstly I ripped some maple to 1.5 x 1.5mm on my table saw using a zero tolerance insert and cut lengths of 45mm on my band saw also using a scrap of MDF for zero tolerance.

232520238_Beadingwirefences(1).JPG.412b0bb148123646c1083a23d86d1e43.JPG

 

1.5mm² is about as small as can be ripped and drilled which comes out at a scale four and a half inches square.

Next I drilled a 7/64” (2.8mm) hole into the end of a scrap of wood as straight as possible about 25mm deep. I then marked and drilled three 0.5mm holes thus.

507412309_Beadingwirefences(2).JPG.8367c86a11f8bd47ea457af0454ef653.JPG

Inserting the thin maple posts into the large hole allows each post to be drilled with a mini drill. More than one attempt at getting the jig perfect was necessary.

1732457814_Beadingwirefences(3).JPG.38b792e36d0e6cd952feb3ffad162f4a.JPG

The drilled posts were dipped in a weathering solution and allowed to dry.

1046910240_Beadingwirefences(4).JPG.042ff417552d8356c022eae3796468db.JPG

2099457796_Beadingwirefences(5).JPG.d3eac6c00fd9eb5b2a82cd764bcb46ad.JPG

 

This picture shows the tools needed to assemble the fence.

1521906952_Beadingwirefences(6).JPG.8bc6cde9a2a33dcb35e1e74c2afba8f2.JPG

 

A suitable length spacer was cut and holes made at equal intervals with a reamer.

edit: The use of a reamer does two things. Stops the foam from collapsing and helps keep the post true to the vertical!

510645964_Beadingwirefences(7).JPG.8a54412f9bff657c8dd07570eae55da9.JPG

The posts were trimmed to a point with a Stanley blade and set into the holes. A scrap of plastic tubing cut to 18mm was slipped over each post before setting to a scale 4’6”.

Lastly the fun bit.

Knots were tied in the ends of three lengths of 0.3mm beading wire and these threaded through the holes in the posts.

The wire is pulled taught and held with the cross lock tweezers. Zap-A-Gap Cyano. is applied to every other post. This super glue has a capillary action which draws the glue into the holes.

Just needs weathering.

2123712175_Beadingwirefences(8).JPG.012bae9f8949d27619eb2b00fa6a1cb0.JPG

Lovely work throughout Shaun

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Hi Shaun, what a cracking job and very well explained, that is a real work of patience and skill. All the best and stay safe Adrian.

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Thank you guys, you're all so kind.

 

Added a lot more moss and rust today.1538396810_Mossrust(2).JPG.be8c8fec0c37c1ef20dee54911783bd7.JPG

 

 

More weeds and overgrown sruberyage still need here.

1707193598_Mossrust(1).JPG.24c6e7567bfe94e3b209d7a456a119ff.JPG

 

 

Funny how one car can change the whole scene and set the era.

1749270297_Mossrust(3).JPG.3c35b752f730435d22fe8d856bcb220b.JPG

 

Regards Shaun

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2 hours ago, Sasquatch said:

Thank you guys, you're all so kind.

 

Added a lot more moss and rust today.1538396810_Mossrust(2).JPG.be8c8fec0c37c1ef20dee54911783bd7.JPG

 

 

More weeds and overgrown sruberyage still need here.

1707193598_Mossrust(1).JPG.24c6e7567bfe94e3b209d7a456a119ff.JPG

 

 

Funny how one car can change the whole scene and set the era.

1749270297_Mossrust(3).JPG.3c35b752f730435d22fe8d856bcb220b.JPG

 

Regards Shaun

More top modelling here Shaun you have real eye for detail:whistle::good:

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After a thorough good clean up this morning I had the whole afternoon free for some scenic work so tackled the other lift of section. It's basically just a horse field, which I have tried to represent with a blend of grasses and weeds, with some areas more grazed than others.

DSCF1164.JPG.43bf3fa4db6cd013261ff14cb7b57248.JPG

 

There are a few details on it such as a grounded coach, wall and tree.

DSCF1166.JPG.40981c47be7496a2d5c16656bea7fa73.JPG

DSCF1165.JPG.d6cf4f50c6a1dc07bea75f8ba3d3bccf.JPG

 

The other very detailed section has been placed back. This gave a chance for a train to appear in front of my camera.

Just a J39 with a Toad E. 

DSCF1163.JPG.bfe54345b9c66ae9c367bdab9d899644.JPG

DSCF1167.JPG.cf5cc929957682d7e329ee8cf1584d31.JPG

 

Hope that you are all well

Regards Shaun

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On 08/05/2020 at 05:50, Sasquatch said:

 

 

There are a few details on it such as a grounded coach, wall and tree.

DSCF1166.JPG.40981c47be7496a2d5c16656bea7fa73.JPG

 

 

Hope that you are all well

Regards Shaun

 

 

How did a Great Western coach body find its way to West Yorkshire?

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12 hours ago, Penrhos1920 said:

 

 

How did a Great Western coach body find its way to West Yorkshire?

 

Now, now!!      :nea_mini:

Rule number one...

 

Julian

 

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