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Goathland & Grim-up-North...Queensbury Flockaging alert.

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5 hours ago, ChrisN said:

How about one of these from Steve Banks web site?  I would have laid money on it being a passenger brake but maybe not.

I'm gonna just "have" to build one of those!!!

What have you started Chris.

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While out yesterday I popped into the Hobby Lobby to see if they had any non toxic glue that would stick styrene sheet to  Polymethyl methacrylate or plexi glass as it more commonly known. I was surprised how knowledgeable the staff were about the many products they sell. Anyway I came away with this.

DSCF0813.JPG.a45b51c2c63be157424019fa11e20d3f.JPG

 

"The Only Non-Toxic water based Superglue". A rather wild claim me thinks. If it were to be true why is cyanoacrylate  so popular!

 

So last night I stuck a front and back  to the window panels. This glue is like a thick PVA and I quickly found that I had to work fast.

This morning I can say that it certainly seems to have done the job. Not the tiniest bit of squeeze out to be found either. In fact it all looks a bit too neat.

DSCF0811.JPG.13b00f130784999a76c38f6fbe666d97.JPG

 

 

Edited by Sasquatch
Pahh.
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8 hours ago, westerhamstation said:

Hi Shaun, coming along nicely, the adhesive seems a useful product, a link to a uk seller of the glue. All the best Adrian.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Crafters-Pick-Ultimate-Glue-8-Ounce/dp/B005IR9I3U

 

 

 Hi Adrian. Thanks for taking the time to find and post a link.

I feel that I must point out that this glue although very useful is no real substitute for any Cyanoacrylate.

Having said that I wish I would have had some when I build that huge mill because this is the perfect glue for those big jobs!

You get quite a lot (236ml) for $5.99 or £6.89 UK Amazon price.

 

Regards Shaun

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Having just read the weather report for our area I have drawn up a work plan.

Get everything around the place done today because Friday & Saturday are going to be quite warm which means time out in the warehouse getting stuff done on the layout!

If I get done early enough and am not too knackered I plan on trying out a new method of building a slate roof this evening and sticking more buildings together.

 

Squatch. Mojo firing on all eight cylinders!!

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I don't suppose you know if it is possible to soak it and release the objects which were glued.  If it does, then it might be a good fixative for  track and trackbed.

 

Regards

 

J

 

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24 minutes ago, jcredfer said:

I don't suppose you know if it is possible to soak it and release the objects which were glued.  If it does, then it might be a good fixative for  track and trackbed.

 

Regards

 

J

 

I'll find a scrap of track and do a test mate.

Squatch

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Did anyone tell you that you are a star?.....   Apart from Mrs S {'cause she might have a preconceived bias}...

 

 

Regards

 

J

 

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It's been one of those days. What ever could go wrong went wrong sort of days.

It started first thing when I went to the fridge to get some milk to make a cuppa.

No Milk! I should have gone back to bed right then and there.

 

Next my friend called to ask for some help with his hobby (he's one of those antique collector kind of guys) that was my afternoon gone! Nothing went right, two of my machines needed fixing for a start then the last of four pointless bits of woodwork went south due to a knot. I then went to the store for a second time to get some strong ale!!

Mrs S. arrived home to find me considerably under the influence and dancing about in the barn all stressed out, telling  me to get a grip and man up. So I went back to the workshop and spent the evening catching up. 

DSCF0823.JPG.9b4c1b8a187d6637a255e3a6e35ca2de.JPG

 

Anyway the modeling yesterday evening was a complete waste of time. I'll explain:...

 

...having tried this method before on a large warehouse roof I thought I'd give it a go on the Queensbury platform buildings. 

DSCF0820.JPG.67200c18f164f160939a082367166b77.JPG

 

Problem was that the slate size on the warehouse roofing seemed a bit too large so i modified the tool to make smaller slates. This didn't work out due to the 2mm spacing turning out far too small for my eyesight.

DSCF0821.JPG.49aae847292c23a338a2f9fc42f332a3.JPG

 

Part of my catching up this evening was to make a new tapered wheel for my bespoke tool.

The taper is sanded by fixing the wood wheel to the hobby sander bed, set at an angle and gently turning to create a perfect round.

I hope the picture explains itself. 

DSCF0819.JPG.c6eef7162fedfa96c731bb7ed2d175df.JPG

 The bespoke tool.DSCF0818.JPG.fb9085347d21ba8eaf41bf216d0e2f64.JPG

 

The idea is simple. To create larger roof sections relatively quickly from foam board, lines are scored through the paper on one side at regular intervals, the tapered wheel is then run along each cut to create the overlay effect and each slate is then cut on the vertical with a sharp knife.

 

I need to get up early and try again, this time reverting to the larger stile of slates. I'm pretty skint right now so scratch building is the only option!!!

 

On the positive side  my hopper wagon received its lettering.

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And lastly the test track/ballast experiment for Julian. The glue holds down the ballast very well.

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Unfortunately after loosing several brownie points for getting small bits of granite ballast in the kitchen sink, I found a thorough  good soaking did nothing towards helping part the track from the cork underlay.  

 

Squatch... off to bed...zzzzzzzz            

Edited by Sasquatch
hung over.
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Hi Shaun, I would patent that bespoke tool before the Acme Engineering works gets sight of it. I didn't know which button to click as that post seem to cover every emotion.

All the best Adrian. 

Edited by westerhamstation
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Quote

And lastly the test track/ballast experiment for Julian. The glue holds down the ballast very well.

 

Unfortunately after loosing several brownie points for getting small bits of granite ballast in the kitchen sink, I found a thorough  good soaking did nothing towards helping part the track from the cork underlay.  

 

 

Thanks Shaun, it looks like a good choice for outdoor projects, but maybe not for my track, which would definitely be in need of adjustment, due to my inadequate skills.

 

Now I feel guilty, too, for causing the loss of hard earned Brownie Points.   :blush:

 

Hope the sleep went well and the next day is more productive.

J

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1 hour ago, westerhamstation said:

Hi Shaun, I would patent that bespoke tool before the Acme Engineering works gets site of it. I didn't know which button to click as that post seem to cover every emotion.

All the best Adrian. 

There's a price for everything! I'd like to set up a seminar to start negotiations with Acme Engineering?  How about I get my secretary to set it up in the conference room of Squatch tower in LA on Friday morning next??? 

 

Regards Shaun

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16 minutes ago, jcredfer said:

 

Thanks Shaun, it looks like a good choice for outdoor projects, but maybe not for my track, which would definitely be in need of adjustment, due to my inadequate skills.

 

Now I feel guilty, too, for causing the loss of hard earned Brownie Points.   :blush:

 

Hope the sleep went well and the next day is more productive.

J

Don't fret my friend. Brownie points aren't hard earned around here. Just deducted from a given quota!!! :rtfm:

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20 minutes ago, jcredfer said:

 

Thanks Shaun, it looks like a good choice for outdoor projects, but maybe not for my track, which would definitely be in need of adjustment, due to my inadequate skills.

 

Now I feel guilty, too, for causing the loss of hard earned Brownie Points.   :blush:

 

Hope the sleep went well and the next day is more productive.

J

Huh.

never say die!!

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This week I'm celebrating 10 years as a member. Hard to believe the layout has been around for a decade!

 

Plans were afoot to go all out by reaching 100 pages on the thread and doing some videos etc. That all went south due to recent events and a hard week caused by a bad batch of insulin.

Life has been interfering with my modeling agenda lately and I'm itching to get cracking on the Queensbury section.

There's light at the end of the tunnel because any work has been put on hold and all the big chores around the property have been completed.

 

First then a great picture of Queensbury station looking down the Keighley line. Plenty of clear detail here including the view up the other end of brow lane.

Queensbury.jpg.91c562981142f33f790e0eda19620f98.jpg

 

Two perfect aspects looking into Exchange taken from the end of platform 5 under Bridge St. bridge. L&Y lines to the left and GNR routes on the right. Note the differing types of signal posts, 04 resident shunter and regular (for the 1970s) class 25 in platform 3. 

s-l1600.jpg.65c5944cff38576b9321fea6f3c9dff2.jpg

s-l1600ll.jpg.22a9b362613b3948dd56a6e261f1ff67.jpg

 

Regards Shaun

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1 hour ago, Sasquatch said:

This week I'm celebrating 10 years as a member. Hard to believe the layout has been around for a decade!

 

Plans were afoot to go all out by reaching 100 pages on the thread and doing some videos etc. That all went south due to recent events and a hard week caused by a bad batch of insulin.

Life has been interfering with my modeling agenda lately and I'm itching to get cracking on the Queensbury section.

There's light at the end of the tunnel because any work has been put on hold and all the big chores around the property have been completed.

 

*snip*

 

Regards Shaun

 

 

I'll do my bit to help your page count, Shaun!

 

Congrats on your decade here - you joined almost the same time as me (my 10 years was apparently early last month, but I confess I had to probe my profile to learn that).

 

Sorry to hear the real world wasn't co-operating with your modelling plans - looking forward to seeing your progress when you get back in the saddle, and hope all is well health-wise.

 

Regards,

 

Scott

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5 hours ago, Sasquatch said:

This week I'm celebrating 10 years as a member. Hard to believe the layout has been around for a decade!

 

Plans were afoot to go all out by reaching 100 pages on the thread and doing some videos etc. That all went south due to recent events and a hard week caused by a bad batch of insulin.

Life has been interfering with my modeling agenda lately and I'm itching to get cracking on the Queensbury section.

There's light at the end of the tunnel because any work has been put on hold and all the big chores around the property have been completed.

 

First then a great picture of Queensbury station looking down the Keighley line. Plenty of clear detail here including the view up the other end of brow lane.

Queensbury.jpg.91c562981142f33f790e0eda19620f98.jpg

 

Two perfect aspects looking into Exchange taken from the end of platform 5 under Bridge St. bridge. L&Y lines to the left and GNR routes on the right. Note the differing types of signal posts, 04 resident shunter and regular (for the 1970s) class 25 in platform 3. 

s-l1600.jpg.65c5944cff38576b9321fea6f3c9dff2.jpg

s-l1600ll.jpg.22a9b362613b3948dd56a6e261f1ff67.jpg

 

Regards Shaun

 

Very interesting pictures Shaun.  They illustrate, clearly, how life was back then.  The beginnings of a more advanced age and magnificent structures, for their time, moderated with the lack of finance of the times.

 

Julian

 

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On 15/03/2020 at 21:24, jukebox said:

 

 

I'll do my bit to help your page count, Shaun!

 

Congrats on your decade here - you joined almost the same time as me (my 10 years was apparently early last month, but I confess I had to probe my profile to learn that).

 

Sorry to hear the real world wasn't co-operating with your modelling plans - looking forward to seeing your progress when you get back in the saddle, and hope all is well health-wise.

 

Regards,

 

Scott

Thank you Scott

 

I know everyone is sick of hearing about it but this lock down is a real good opportunity  to get back in the saddle and use it to get a decent amount of modeling time in!

 

A plan of action will be drawn up. The dinning table commandeered  once again, tools sharpened and  the mojo tuned and fired up!!!

 

Health wise I'd had two vials of insulin that just didn't work and things went from bad to worse ending up with DKA (Ketoacidosis). My clinic have had this problem with other patients and have switched my brand of insulin.

 

Regards Shaun

 

 

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On 16/03/2020 at 01:11, jcredfer said:

 

Very interesting pictures Shaun.  They illustrate, clearly, how life was back then.  The beginnings of a more advanced age and magnificent structures, for their time, moderated with the lack of finance of the times.

 

Julian

 

Hi Julian

 On more than one occasion I've been asked. "What it was like growing up in the UK during the seventies". Judging by the type of person asking I jumped to the conclusion that what was meant was... "What was it like growing up under a social government". As kids we didn't take too much notice to our surroundings being used to what we were. Thinking back there were a lot of late trains, a lot of lazy looking employees and quite a bit of urban decay towards the end of the decade. It is a shame we lost Exchange station under those circumstances and I would put my neck out to say we're lucky we didn't loose more such as Brighton and York!

 

Regards Shaun

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Only half of the seventies was under Labour and half under the Conservatives though.  Mind you, Heath and Thatcher probably look like socialists when compared to US politics.

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As one of the boomers, I remember contrasts between places where paint was fairly fresh and looked after, alongside others where that tin of paint just wasn't an option.  Post war Staffs was a pretty filthy place, from mining, pot-banks and steel making, plus the production of Gas.  Poverty [the real one, not the calculated modern Gov't one] was never far away in any direction, accepted and understood by pretty much the whole area.  Rationing evened much out, too, with people growing stuff and keeping chickens etc, on every patch of earth which could be used.  I am reliably informed that the odd rabbit might find it's way into the kitchen, should the right person be approached.  [[Not that we ever......    honest Guv.]

 

"Aside" - Ten years ago, I was sitting working in my classroom, whilst a history less was taking place in there.  It was about WWII and life after.  The teacher suddenly decided that he had a really useful teaching aid in the room and turned, without warning, to ask me how rationing was organised and what it was like.  [Thanks!!] A quick description of ration book, what they contained and how they were used was pretty easy and they seemed quite happy with that.  They also seemed happy with the Gov scheme where animals could be bought and raised, then taken to licensed butchers, who would do the business and butcher the animals, in exchange for an amount of the animal for themselves.  What they got mouth open about were the quantities involved, for the tickets and lack of the imported products which are common place now.

 

In order to give them an idea of it, I remembered a day when, as a 6 yr old, I got back from school [remember the days when a kid could come home to an empty house and just walk in, 'cos the door didn't need to be locked?].  I was quite hungry and sliced a couple of rounds of bread, which I toasted and spread a liberal quantity of butter - very nice too!  Except that I had just used the last bit in the dish. and got into hot water when the adult creatures returned.  I had just finished the ration for the week, albeit near the end of the week.  Someone asked what a single person's ration of butter would have been, so I picked up a white-board marker and covered up part of it leaving what would have been a reasonable representation of the amount for one person/week. [I may have been slightly generous as things look bigger when you are that small.]  Their faces were still a mixture of disbelief and realisation of the real nature of rationing.

 

Back on topic, the pictures are a strong reminder of how many wooden structures there were about, in those days, flaky paint and all.  Manpower was the common practice, so setting a "lad" to rub down and paint the place wouldn't have been a big issue for many firms.  Looked after, or flaky paint, the place looked a lot different back then, but none less practical for all that.

 

Julian

PS.  Rationing may make a return in modern times should the ignorant and self-serving continue to prevent pensioners from obtaining reasonable amounts of bum wiping products.

 

 

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2 hours ago, teaky said:

Only half of the seventies was under Labour and half under the Conservatives though.  Mind you, Heath and Thatcher probably look like socialists when compared to US politics.

Heath yes, arguably the last socialist PM we've had as Blair and Brown were pretty right wing. The witch. aka Thatcher, not really although still a bit left of the current lot despite her hard hitting policies/

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, teaky said:

Only half of the seventies was under Labour and half under the Conservatives though.  Mind you, Heath and Thatcher probably look like socialists when compared to US politics.

 

Heath yes, arguably the last socialist PM we've had as Blair and Brown were pretty right wing. The witch. aka Thatcher, not really although still a bit left of the current lot despite her hard hitting policies

 

I read this as a comparison of UK politics as a comparison to the USA politics and as such it reflects an accurate comment.

 

Julian

 

Edited by jcredfer
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Hi Julian. Nice enjoyable reading my friend!:sungum::sungum:

In light of current events we have surprised ourselves at how good we have been at pulling our horns in.

Having stocked the small pantry and freezer drawer with a sensible amount of food like most people we, then started making meals from leftovers and moved on to finishing up all the food that had already been opened before consuming the slightly out of date stuff and are now looking at the nearly out of date produce. So far it's been 2 weeks since I went grocery shopping and the only two things we have gotten into are the gorgonzola and bacon!

 

It's been a lesson in how much we waste by over eating, making expensive choices, letting things go off, out of date and treating the dogs. Who by the way need to loose some weight along with those over domesticate feline lodgers.

 

Yesterday I managed to find myself in the warehouse. After spending several hours locating a short cause by an over-center spring, I did the spring cleaning and had a good reorganization of all the modeling paraphernalia, Somehow I found about two dozen cardboard boxes that are now in the recycle pile.

 

Next I removed the tall shelving unit out of there and am now ready to make the baseboard that will join Goathland to the rest of the layout, Having the afternoon totally free I'm looking forward to getting stuck in big time!

 

DSCF0824.JPG.b463c98aa6ea4f0c8bac4e9389fab859.JPG

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DSCF0829.JPG.c88e7e964b3add03a27435227792be8b.JPG

 

Regards Shaun

 

 

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Thanks Shaun, I must be getting old, to rabbit on at length like that, you must have the patience of Job.

 

I like the last group of pictures, which have given a lovely perspective to where the more detailed ones fit into the overall layout.  There is a whole load of work displayed there and it looks really good, too.  {But then, your layouts do have a habit of being like that.}

 

Julian

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