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MikeTrice

Using Inkscape to produce cutting files, a worked example

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Hi everyone

 

I have been trying to save a dxf file from Inkscape to modify in my CAD (Draftsight 2018), before passing on to a laser cutter.

 

Problem: no matter what I do the file size always seems to be 4kb and when opened in Draftsight all I get is a completely blank screen. I have tried openning the saved files in Inkscape and there are blank there as well. Therefore, I suspect that my problem is in the saving part of the process. I think that I have tried every option in the options box when saving, but .....

 

Has anyone any useful suggestions to enable me to do this 'simple' task?

 

Regards

David

 

Hi David, I don't have any experience of using Inkscape to output to a machine, but I stumbled across this site whilst looking for something else, and remembered your question:

http://www.bigbluesaw.com/saw/big-blue-saw-blog/general-updates/big-blue-saws-dxf-export-for-inkscape.html

 

Looks as if it might do the trick - the link to the download is at the end of the article,

Regards, Mike

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Hi David, I don't have any experience of using Inkscape to output to a machine, but I stumbled across this site whilst looking for something else, and remembered your question:

http://www.bigbluesaw.com/saw/big-blue-saw-blog/general-updates/big-blue-saws-dxf-export-for-inkscape.html

 

Looks as if it might do the trick - the link to the download is at the end of the article,

Regards, Mike

Hi Mike

 

That looks interesting and I will explore it as they seem to have sorted some accuracy problems.

 

I actually found my own fault/solution by mistake. The files that are exported from Inkscape seem to be a a very high zoom factor and so I could see nothing. By zooming to 'see all' in Draftsight the file becomes visible (all be it at a very low zoom factor).

 

Your link looks good and I will explore it later.

 

Regards

Dave

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post-6220-0-60996500-1536256517_thumb.jpg

0-6-0

At last I found the intended chassis, the Bachmann Billy chassis I re-wheeled ages ago. I thought it would be slim enough to make a tiny shunting loco like this Hudswell Clark but perhaps not one as small as a Manning Wadrle. I can place the bits of the body over the motor and try them for size for the first time.

 

I'll carry on showing the development work on this model back in the Scratch building or modifying sections.

Edited by relaxinghobby
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On ‎28‎/‎09‎/‎2016 at 16:14, MikeTrice said:

This is a quick proof of concept to show how I do rivets. The basic technique is to produce two layers of 10 thou, one to have the rivets embossed into, the other to act as a rivetting template. With careful thought the rivetting template can form part of the final build.

 

So taking a wagon as an example my intention here is to form the main sides from 4 laminations of 10 thou with a fifth layer of 10 thou strapping.

 

For the outside layers here I have a planked (engraved) side with the rivet positions cut out by the cutter then drilled 0.5mm. The rectangle to the left is the corner plate:

post-3717-0-53416600-1475074762_thumb.jpg

 

The corner plate has been welded in place and I have opened up the holes for one of the door straps. Note that to aid positioning when engraving the planking I also engraved an outline for the strap:

post-3717-0-24749600-1475074763_thumb.jpg

 

For the inner side one piece is engraved and the other spot marked for the rivet positions.:

post-3717-0-05867500-1475074764_thumb.jpg

 

The two inner sides are glued together then the rivets pressed out from behind using an old school compass with the work piece resting on a self sealing cutting board (I should have removed cutting burrs first, but forgot):

post-3717-0-54480600-1475074764_thumb.jpg

 

For the outer side the door strap was fixed in place using the outline as a guide and put aside for the solvent to harden. Finally the rivets were pressed in from the back again with the compass (again forgetting to de-burr):

post-3717-0-37838900-1475075206_thumb.jpg

 

I then laminated the inner and outer side together completely forgetting that I intended to have 4 layers + strapping so ended up with 3 layers + strapping.

 

A couple of images showing the side after having a quick coat of primer:

post-3717-0-19918900-1475074765_thumb.jpg

 

post-3717-0-79670100-1475074765_thumb.jpg

 

What I have done here may seem odd, fixing the strapping first with solvent rather than embossing in their own right. I have found in the past that the enbossing process can distort the strapping (typically bulging where the rivets go). This way the strapping tends not to do this.

 

I would also benefit by taking off the sharp tip of the compass against some wet and dry.

 

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Hi Mike

A very basic  question, how do you arrange the holes in the side so you can push the compass point through to make the rivets on the strapping,

I have place a guide line to keep them in line ,but cant get the circle tool to make  the holes consistent  ,& I have tried control D to duplicate ,but with no success, can you advise?

I would also like to thank You ,Jason & the other Mike  &  everybody else who has contributed on Inkscape  & the silhouette cutter, it is a marvellous body of work  & much appreciated-long may it continue 

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That is going back a bit. I do use the circle tool to mark rivet positions and they are very small circles. As ling as the cutting tool marks the styrene there is enough to start drilling the hole right through. I have not had issues with accuracy.

 

Can I suggest you PM me your file and I will have a look and see if I can advise.

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