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grahame

Scratch-built card and styrene structures (based on real buildings)

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I expect that you realize that the Southwark Local History Library and Archive is just down Borough High Street, behind the John Harvard Library. They have a mass of old photos of the borough - I know, as, for a time I worked part-time there and one of my jobs was to return photos, that had been looked at by visitors, to their files, to ensure they went back to the right slot. At the time some were on line but the majority weren't, so one had to visit and look for one's self. Only in exceptional circumstances were the staff able to do research for you, although they were helpful in guiding you through the archives. This was down to the staffing levels - which I suspect are probably worse now than in 2005 when I was there. I can't say I find their website that easy to access. Their emphasis seems to be on paintings rather than photos, but I may not have done the right search.

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This morning I've cobbled together some of the roof structures/details. I notice that in recent years the chimney stack (an open flue for a boiler?) has been removed and replaced by a long cylindrical tank (but this only appears in more recent photos) so I've gone with the stack.

 

125047.jpg

 

G.

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It's got to the stage where I feel compelled to give everything a dusting of grey primer. This helps identify where there are issues with the model that need tweaking:

 

132758.jpg

 

G.

Edited by grahame
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Next a bit of therapy with styrene strip in making up the window girder grid. It's just placed in position and not glued in position (in the pic below) as painting, and the window frames and lower panelling/doorways have to be added:

 

161137.jpg

 

G.

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The plan is to use a large sheet of clear plastic as glazing to go behind the whole grid wall and I've cut a sheet to fit. The lower sections of each rectangle need an infil panel. For that I'll probably use a coloured self adhesive strip of label paper (if I can find my supply of whole sheet labels) for each floor. The main wall for the other side will be constructed in a similar manner with five storeys but at the moment I don't know the exact height they need to be so will have to leave them ATM. 

 

220938.jpg

 

G.

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All looking most proficient and impressive Grahame :)

 

When do we get some clues about the layout upon which these fine buildings will eventually reside?

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All looking most proficient and impressive Grahame https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_smile3.gif

 

When do we get some clues about the layout upon which these fine buildings will eventually reside?

 

Thanks.

 

The clues are there, as we go through the modelling. . . . . But it's going to take a house move first.

:-)

 

G.

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Slow progress today, mainly getting some colour on the building. The concrete section seems to be a very pale grey which I've tried to replicate and the brickwork a dark maroon colour. I've got the base colour on but there is more to do with regards to the brickwork (including the windows) and weathering. The front window wall isn't yet complete and is only resting in place. But it's taking shape.

 

210556.jpg

 

G.

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My styrene and card city is starting to take shape (although none of the buildings can claim to be finished):

 

095406.jpg

 

G.

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My styrene and card city is starting to take shape (although none of the buildings can claim to be finished):

 

095406.jpg

 

G.

 

Outstanding modelling - so good to see someone take on quite an unusual approach and make such a superb job of it. To see all these building together is quite something and makes me look forward to seeing the streets, street furniture etc. Keep it up, Sir.

 

Chaz

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As well as the power box (featured earlier in this thread) but not pictured above, I've also had a bash at the old 'modern' box at the Borough Market end of the through platforms and which, I understand, became the staion announcers office. I doubt it has survived the recent 'redevelopment'. Again it's not complete:

 

123035.jpg

 

G.

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Grahame, I had missed your topic. Really good modelling as usual.

I don't know if the following pics are of use. We changed the transformer many years ago, might show bits you have not seen.

post-1373-0-06424000-1482062100.jpg

post-1373-0-86963500-1482062115.jpg

post-1373-0-62747000-1482062127.jpg

post-1373-0-19428900-1482062137.jpg

post-1373-0-33935000-1482062146.jpg

Cheers.

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Grahame, I had missed your topic. Really good modelling as usual.

I don't know if the following pics are of use. We changed the transformer many years ago, might show bits you have not seen.

 

Cheers.

Many thanks. Some interesting pics there. I've noted the NSE red (pink) lampposts, the dual coloured (black and white) doors, the cabling on the walls and the palisade security gates to prevent getting rail side.

 

G.

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Christmas preparations are eating in to precious modelling time so progress has slowed right down. However I managed to snatch a little time in which I spent fiddling with bits of styrene and starting to make some more of the wide range and large number of air-con units and associated equipment that is seen on the roofs of commercial buildings these days.

 

105536.jpg

 

G.

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Found another from the LT Museum taken in the 60s. This is how I remember it when I first started working in London. Dirty and dusty unlike Adelaide where I had just returned from! 

 

Sorry to hear Stoney Lane is gone. I love anything Southern Electric, especially N scale..

 

Gerry

 

Wow Grahame,

 

I've only just discovered this thread, and I am stunned both by the quality and the speed at which you are working. I remember waling around London Bridge and the city in the mid 80s when I was about 6. Seeing your buildings, especially the walkway, has brought back so many memories.

 

Going back to the angular red brick building which was part of the Underground entrance, I thought I'd try to add a little more history. It was opened in February 1900 as the first station on the City and South London Railway Angel extension. This was pre-escalator days, so the booking hall gave access to lifts. The original formation of the CSLR passed close to this site, but on a different level, and I believe there are still grills in the ceiling of the Northern Line platforms which open out into the old tunnels which are at this point used for ventilation. The original tunnels under the river veered slightly to the west, before coming around on a sharp 90 degree curve into the original terminus at King William Street. This was sited on an E-W axis, and was therefore unsuitable for the extension through the city. Also, the curve and gradients of the 'Arthur Street curve' at the ends of the platforms gave terrible operating problems, and I think the CSLR were glad to be rid of their city terminus!

 

I don't know when the building ceased to be used for passenger access, but I guess it would have coincided with the arrival of escalators and the new access which came up on the main concourse. It is/was a beautiful example of CSLR architecture, similar to the odd visible bits of the original Angel, and the last truncated remains of City Road. I think you have captured it really well, and I am looking forward to seeing this project progressing.

 

Charlie

Edited by L49

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Thanks for the feedback and information.

 

I've just discovered that the building (with All Bar One on the ground floor) that I've been making a representation of, is called Fielden House and is scheduled for demolition to be replaced with another tower block that will incorporate appartments and retail outlets. http://moderngov.southwark.gov.uk/ieDecisionDetails.aspx?ID=4919

 

I'm still looking for pics of it in the 70s, 80s and 90s. For example the little shop is now a coffee bar (see the second pic in post #68) but I seem to recall it being a key cutting service or tobacconists back in the 70s and 80s. And there certainly wasn't an All Bar One then.

 

In the modelling effort I've managed to get the ends on, primer and the basic colour coat on to the A/C units. Just a few details to add now:

 

144328.jpg

 

G.

Edited by grahame
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Apologies for possibly going a little off topic, but on the subject of shops; can anyone remember the camera shop which used to be on the walkway. We used to walk past it every Saturday back in the mid 90s when we were chasing EPBs all over the South Eastern, and I can't for the life of me remember what it was called.

 

I do remember that in common with lots of shops in the City, it kept odd hours, and was never open when I actually needed film!

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I remember it but not the name. It was probsbly either London Camera Exchange or Jessops.

Also in the Walk was a Richer Sounds that was in the Guinness World Records Book as being the shop with the highest turnover per square foot. It has now moved to a larger premises in Tooley Street.

One thing I remember about Tooley Street was it had a lot of pubs and there only seems to be a couple now, one of which is the Shipwrights Arms which I've made a model of. On the old closed pubs website there are about 17 pubs listed for Tooley Street - now all but a couple have gone.

 

184022.jpg  184115.jpg

G.

Edited by grahame
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I remember it but not the name. It was probsbly either London Camera Exchange or Jessops.

 

Also in the Walk was a Richer Sounds that was in the Guinness World Records Book as being the shop with the highest turnover per square foot. It has now moved to a larger premises in Tooley Street.

 

One thing I remember about Tooley Street was it had a lot of pubs and there only seems to be a couple now, one of which is the Shipwrights Arms which I've made a model of. On the old closed pubs website there are about 17 pubs listed for Tooley Street - now all but a couple have gone.

 

G.

I think it was an LCE branch. If I looked through my ancient receipts and guarantees I would probably find out, as I am sure I bought some kit there, back in the 1980s.

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A fairly recent shot of one of the units on the station approach, rather than the London Bridge Walk. I am afraid it displays my dubious sense of humour. On another site I belonged to a group which shared photos of shop fronts!

post-14351-0-26804700-1482436913_thumb.jpg

 

The others are general views of London Bridge Station & Tooley Street, from the west. The second is dated 28.6.2008.

 

post-14351-0-55974800-1482436911_thumb.jpg

post-14351-0-26801900-1482436916_thumb.jpg

Edited by phil_sutters
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One thing I remember about Tooley Street was it had a lot of pubs and there only seems to be a couple now, one of which is the Shipwrights Arms which I've made a model of. On the old closed pubs website there are about 17 pubs listed for Tooley Street - now all but a couple have gone.

 

G.

Here are a couple I photographed a couple of years ago. The Brigade is a former fire station and quite a quirky looking building from this angle.

post-14351-0-01752800-1482449259_thumb.jpg

 

post-14351-0-01833600-1482449260_thumb.jpg

 

and this is another distinctive Tooley Street building opposite the northern entrance to LB Station.

post-14351-0-05901700-1482449274_thumb.jpg

Edited by phil_sutters
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The 'Bridge Lounge' is a modern re-incarnation name for a splendid building. It was originally called the 'King of Prussia' with the address as 1 Fair Street (now 186 Tooley Street), and renamed the 'King of Belgium' at the outbreak of the first World War.

 

Other 'gone' pubs in Tooley Street include:

 

Admiral Hood #182

Antigallican #155

Britannia #154

City of Salisbury #?

Cooperage #48-50

Duke of Clarence #69

Grapes #22

Green Man #214

Horse and Cart #43

Kings Head #178

Old Kings Head #?

Platform #56-58

Queens Head #207

Roebuck #6

Royal Oak #113

Southwark Arms #151

St Johns Tavern #171

White Lion #8

 

I've only been in a couple of them but I do remember drinking in a pub on the station forecourt call the Oast House but that has now been demolished.

 

G.

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The others are general views of London Bridge Station & Tooley Street, from the west. The second is dated 28.6.2008.

 

 

What day of the week were those pics taken - Tooley Street look unusually devoid of traffic, particularly buses.

 

G.

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Christmas has curtailed any new modelling activity although I've been able to finally glaze the window cut-outs on the Hays Galleria low relief model from the start of this thread:  

 

141425.jpg

 

G.

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