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Guest Stewart_Mason

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Guest Stewart_Mason

Hi all.

I'm writing to introduce myself as a new entrant to the hobby. I have attended several model railway exhibitions this year, and the one I enjoyed most was at the 'Head of Steam' at Darlington, where some of the 2FS guys had a stand up on the footbridge. I was intrigued and came away with some magazines and the starter pack with the track section and wagon kit.

I am 43, and the last time I touched a model railway was as a teenager, which was the usual 'OO' gauge oval of track with a siding, and a little Hornby shunting loco.

I'm looking for something absorbing to while away the winter evenings and relax me after work, and I thought this would be the ideal thing. I have read a lot lately about scales and gauges, and I have no interest whatsoever in OO gauge or ready to run, but I'm drawn towards finescale, either 2, 3 or 4mm (P4). Of all of these 2mm is whetting my appetitie at the moment, largely due to the small area needed for a layout. (I prefer smaller layouts/dioramas). 

I appreciate the need at the start to convert ready to run locos and stock, but I'd rather build from kits or scratchbuild if it turns out I can do this. I'm in no rush.

I have gathered together some basic tools as suggested in the guide, and I'm ready to have a go at the wagon kit.

I will post my progress pictures here for either encouragement or derision!

 

Stewart M.

 

 

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build a little track with a turnout (easitrac is a excellent  start)  convert a diesel of your choice (drop in wheels less than ten minutes to convert) and then begin to learn while you have something that runs and will test your new builds regardless of what ever prototype you chose 

 

Nick

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build a little track with a turnout (easitrac is a excellent  start)  convert a diesel of your choice (drop in wheels less than ten minutes to convert) and then begin to learn while you have something that runs and will test your new builds regardless of what ever prototype you chose 

 

Nick

Convert a bogie diesel of your choice. You can convert an 03/04/08 if you wish, but from a modelling standpoint it's basically a steam engine and a bit trickier to convert.

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Convert a bogie diesel of your choice. You can convert an 03/04/08 if you wish, but from a modelling standpoint it's basically a steam engine and a bit trickier to convert.

you are of course correct but I assumed that mentioning drop in wheels would suggest a compatible bogie diesel as listed in the 2mm Associations shops page.....

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Welcome aboard Stewart. Id agree with everything the others have said, Convert a diesel with drop in wheels, bit of track and a couple of points and then the world is your oyster in terms of what you build. Start with a few kits but the great joy of scratchbuilding is that you can have whatever you want.

Id advocate a small layout which gives you the opportunity to try all sorts of techniques - my own 'William Smith's Wharf' which you can find on my Tucking Mill thread is only two feet long but offered plenty of modelling opportunities and is fun to play with for the odd half hour. There are plenty of other examples of compact little layouts.

 

Jerry

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Guest Stewart_Mason

Thanks guys, I'll have a go at the wagon and see how it goes. I've a feeling my bumblefingers will be a little large...but we'll see.

Unfortunately I have no interest in bogie diesels! Even though I was brought up in the Blue and Yellow era, and then worked for BR in S&T I'm a steam lover, and a fan of both broad gauge, and also electrcal, particularly the tyneside 'Harton' stystem.

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That may be. But you will still find it a boon to have a working loco for testing your layout. You can always sell it on later.

The problem with starting finescale modelling is a bit like the chicken and egg problem. Either, you build a locomotive, and have no track to test it on, or, you build some track and have no locomotive to test on it. This is where the bogie diesel comes in. It's a very quick conversion and you can use it to test your track. Once you know the track works you can then use it to test any steam locomotives (or coupled diesels) that you build.

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I  speak from experience of this it was only once I built Line No20  on which Diesels and EMU's run around quite happily it  showed up all the short falls in wagons etc which although ran on a straight test track encountered problems ( buffer lock etc) when pushed or pulled through the mini-layout, as for steamers a good slow running one still alludes me but I keep trying.  The mistake of building things without somewhere to run them and something to propel them is now obvious to me 

 

Nick

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That may be. But you will still find it a boon to have a working loco for testing your layout. You can always sell it on later.

 

 

The problem with starting finescale modelling is a bit like the chicken and egg problem. Either, you build a locomotive, and have no track to test it on, or, you build some track and have no locomotive to test on it. This is where the bogie diesel comes in. It's a very quick conversion and you can use it to test your track. Once you know the track works you can then use it to test any steam locomotives (or coupled diesels) that you build.

I  speak from experience of this it was only once I built Line No20  on which Diesels and EMU's run around quite happily it  showed up all the short falls in wagons etc which although ran on a straight test track encountered problems ( buffer lock etc) when pushed or pulled through the mini-layout, as for steamers a good slow running one still alludes me but I keep trying.  The mistake of building things without somewhere to run them and something to propel them is now obvious to me 

 

 

Nick

I would exercise care though! Whilst a Bo-Bo diesel and a rake of MkI coaches may happily negotiate the pointwork on your layout, a 6 or 8 coupled locomotive especially with bogie and pony trucks will test another layer of accuracy and fastidiousness. Especially if you are daft enough to build a layout with nary a scrap of straight rail on it. ;)

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Whilst I would tend to agree that a bogie diesel will offer a very quick 2FS loco "to be going along with" for testing purposes, if ones interests are not in that direction then I for one wouldn't (and didn't) go down that route.  The reason I say that is that I knew the sorts of models I eventually wanted and decided that if I could not produce them then the scale was simply beyond me, having a working diseasel wouldn't make the scale any more workable for me.

 

I would suggest that the Association chassis kits or the newer conversion kits might provide a relatively simple way to a running steam loco, although my own first engine took 3 attempts at the Farish pannier chassis to get a running example I was happy with!

 

What I would strongly suggest though is to try to get along to one of the Area Groups (if one is relatively near you), the help and support that fellow 2mm scale modellers can provide was for me of great benefit.

 

Ian

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Whilst I would tend to agree that a bogie diesel will offer a very quick 2FS loco "to be going along with" for testing purposes, if ones interests are not in that direction then I for one wouldn't (and didn't) go down that route.  The reason I say that is that I knew the sorts of models I eventually wanted and decided that if I could not produce them then the scale was simply beyond me, having a working diseasel wouldn't make the scale any more workable for me.

 

I would suggest that the Association chassis kits or the newer conversion kits might provide a relatively simple way to a running steam loco, although my own first engine took 3 attempts at the Farish pannier chassis to get a running example I was happy with!

 

What I would strongly suggest though is to try to get along to one of the Area Groups (if one is relatively near you), the help and support that fellow 2mm scale modellers can provide was for me of great benefit.

 

Ian

 

Yes, borrowing someone else's working loco and stock to test your track is also an excellent idea.

 

Chris

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I would exercise care though! Whilst a Bo-Bo diesel and a rake of MkI coaches may happily negotiate the pointwork on your layout, a 6 or 8 coupled locomotive especially with bogie and pony trucks will test another layer of accuracy and fastidiousness. Especially if you are daft enough to build a layout with nary a scrap of straight rail on it. ;)

Hi

 

I found the Bo-Bo derailed on one of my points yet a Co-Co didn't so you should really test with as many items as possible that you intend to use.

 

Cheers

 

Paul

Edited by PaulCheffus
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Thanks guys, I'll have a go at the wagon and see how it goes. I've a feeling my bumblefingers will be a little large...but we'll see.

Unfortunately I have no interest in bogie diesels! Even though I was brought up in the Blue and Yellow era, and then worked for BR in S&T I'm a steam lover, and a fan of both broad gauge, and also electrcal, particularly the tyneside 'Harton' stystem.

 

Broad Gauge is a whole separate kettle of fish, and puts things firmly into the "serious scratch-builder of everything" camp.   Whilst the track gauge is huge, the rest of things are tiny - 19th century locos are not big, yet somehow have to conceal a mechanism within that limited space.  Even basic things like wheels will push you into making components.  Axles are longer than standard gauge, so the 2mm loco wheels don't fit (unless you get them as castings and machine yourself), and the longest wagon axle we have is 15.2mm, which is too short for an outside axlebox wagon/coach.  There is an outside chance that the broad-gauge society has a few components; many years ago there was a brief flurry of interest in 2mm broad gauge, and I think most products ended up with them.    (Even in 4mm scale, broad gauge locos are really small, so its worth thinking whether its practical in 2mm )

 

Harton system probably do-able in 2mm, though again its surprisingly small.   I know that Michael at Judith Edge kits has shot down loco bodies, but that's only the start of the fun of building them.  Next comes identifying (or scratchbuilding) bogies, squeezing in a motor, etc..   Yes, possible, but not easy.   There are lots of NE hopper wagons around, most are really excellent etched kit bodies - not the quickest to assemble, but done carefully the results are superb - so the rolling stock should be relatively simple. 

 

I suggest a quickly re-wheeled Farish Jinty or Pannier 0-6-0T as a test loco.  If neither suits your interests, its probably possible to bash a body which looks "NE-Colliery" onto one of them, though unlikely to be dead-scale.  

 

 

- Nigel

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I thought I'd do the thing of converting a bogie diesel with drop in wheels as a test loco. The plan came a bit unstuck as the wheels for the loco I had bought were out of stock. I ended up equipping the loco with DCC and sound, building an N gauge layout to run it on instead and buying more N locos and stock to go with it.

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Harton system probably do-able in 2mm, though again its surprisingly small.   I know that Michael at Judith Edge kits has shot down loco bodies, but that's only the start of the fun of building them.  Next comes identifying (or scratchbuilding) bogies, squeezing in a motor, etc..   Yes, possible, but not easy.   There are lots of NE hopper wagons around, most are really excellent etched kit bodies - not the quickest to assemble, but done carefully the results are superb - so the rolling stock should be relatively simple.  

- Nigel

Hi

 

I have a couple of the Judith Edge Harton kits in 2mm but as you say they are very small and motorising them will be interesting. So far I have put the base of one together. The next step will be to build the body which should then give some idea of just how much room there is to squeeze a motor in.

 

To get a feel for the locos I have almost built the 4mm version of the same kit. I have just a couple of small details to add before painting.

 

Cheers

 

Paul

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Guest Stewart_Mason

Great replies guys. Very interesting. I'd love a Farish Jinty, it would go well with the north east scene. I understand the the 2FS shops have a conversion for this?

I have a baseboard ready to go, it's 4' X 1' and covered in cork, totally level and true, but I feel it may be a little large for a starter in 2FS?

I'm going to start the association wagon kit tonight...

 

Thanks once again for your replies.

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Great replies guys. Very interesting. I'd love a Farish Jinty, it would go well with the north east scene. I understand the the 2FS shops have a conversion for this?

I have a baseboard ready to go, it's 4' X 1' and covered in cork, totally level and true, but I feel it may be a little large for a starter in 2FS?

I'm going to start the association wagon kit tonight...

 

Thanks once again for your replies.

Hi

 

My current and first 2mm layout is 50" X 10" so not much different to your baseboard size.

 

Cheers

 

Paul

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Guest Stewart_Mason

I've incorporated a controller into the baseboard top, idea being to hide it with scenery or a building or some such. I will have a go at posting a photo.

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Great replies guys. Very interesting. I'd love a Farish Jinty, it would go well with the north east scene. I understand the the 2FS shops have a conversion for this?

I have a baseboard ready to go, it's 4' X 1' and covered in cork, totally level and true, but I feel it may be a little large for a starter in 2FS?

I'm going to start the association wagon kit tonight...

 

Thanks once again for your replies.

 

 

Have a look here :-  http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/82934-farish-jinty-2fs-dcc-jinty-update-4f-2fsdcc-conversion/ - post #33 on the second page - for a shot of the Jinty conversion ready to drop into a chassis.

 

This is a mini layout I built a while ago - now scrapped - with the viewable area being 33"x 6" (it used plug-in cantilevered cassettes), but 4'x1' gives you a bit more elbow room. http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/81001-signal-position-advice/

 

Some would say there is no such thing as too much room.........

 

Izzy

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Guest Stewart_Mason

Made progress on the 'plank,' it was quite easy to build, and I stuck the cork down with automotive trim tack. It's nicely square and flat, so should be OK for a 2FS layout. It's the first baseboard I've ever built. I had issues with the pictures so I have deleted them and will try again soon.

I emailed Mike Edge and he has agreed to do me a Harton electric loco body (number 2/10) in 2mm scale, so I'm sure it will be fiddly, but hopefully an interesting talking point when trundling along to the staithes and back on my layout. I need to find a motor bogie or other mechanism to put under it. I wonder if it is possible to modify a Kato tram chassis? Just a thought.

Edited by Stewart_Mason
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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Stewart_Mason

Well in the lull between Christmas and it's dreadful cousin 'New Year' I find myself with time on my hands. So to work on my Association wagon kit. Stage 3 and I find myself needing some parts, and some tools. This is good. New tools are always a pleasure.

I need top hat bearings, a reamer, and a soldering iron. I guess I need to join the association to get the bearings (crafty that!) so the form is in the post, which leaves the reamer and the soldering iron. Any suggestions on what to get? I have a 50w iron from my aeromodelling kit, but It's a tad big. I'm guessing 15 to 25w with adjustable temperature, flux and 60/40 solder?

As to the reamer, I haven't a clue. Suggestions required.

Loving it so far, very relaxing indeed. 

 

Stewart.

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Go for the best iron you can afford, preferably temperature controlled and with a variety of interchangeable bits.

 

You can buy sets of reamers from various outlets fairly cheaply which are perfectly adequate for reaming out holes in etches.

 

For soldering up etched kits i can't see beyond 188 solder paint.   Mine cost me £11.00 at a show years ago and I doubt I've used ¼ of it, so it will see me out.  If buying solder, go for cored solder, plumbers solder from DIY outlets.  Avoid lead free at all costs, it's hopeless for kit assembly( and most other things!).

 

Jim

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 If buying solder, go for cored solder, plumbers solder from DIY outlets.  

 

Did you mean to include the word "not" or "or" in there? Cored solder and plumbers solder are very different beasts and I wouldn't use either for kit building.

 

I always use something from the Carr's range, along with a suitable flux.

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