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Oxford N7

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Don’t forget the definition of “the end” is subjective...

 

1968 was the end in the north west.. if you lived in other parts of the country the end wasn’t much earlier.

looking to the volumes of diesels churned out between 1958-1962 “the end” was 1962, the survivors is what was left.

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As one whose spotting heyday it was,I agree with that observation.1962 was indeed the year when dieselisation really kicked in.

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Going off topic as well I can remember British Railways steam it was only thirty years ago ,,or have you forgotten the vale of rheidol !     British Rail steam in rail blue with arrows doesn't matter that it was narrow gauge it was still steam on British rail.

 Back on about N7 it does surprise me that I haven't Seen pages of moaning about this and that being totally wrong, yea! Keep going in that direction Oxford very happy with my gray thing that I bought as I couldn't wait for a LNER black one

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On the other hand, apart from a few specials, steam in its closing years on BR was dirty; so dirty that locomotives which were supposed to be green looked patchy, matt dark grey. They were not well maintained; they clattered and leaked steam from joints. On the other hand, preserved steam gleams and is lovingly maintained. I like steam that way although I realise that many who experienced the end of steam like the rust, the dirt and the peeling paint.

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I didn't, and don't.  I prefer my locos to be work stained but with the livery discernible; there wasn't much of that after '62, but let's be honest, the diesels were pretty filthy on those days as well.

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On 22/07/2019 at 09:46, No Decorum said:

On the other hand, apart from a few specials, steam in its closing years on BR was dirty; so dirty that locomotives which were supposed to be green looked patchy, matt dark grey. They were not well maintained; they clattered and leaked steam from joints. On the other hand, preserved steam gleams and is lovingly maintained. I like steam that way although I realise that many who experienced the end of steam like the rust, the dirt and the peeling paint.

 

...Except where Peter Townend was involved! 

 

The Nim.

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Any news on the BR and DCC sound versions? All very quiet. 

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On 21/07/2019 at 20:58, scots region said:

Its fascinating and a more than a little upsetting, that in a few years there will be more alive people who remember steam through preservation than remember the operational period.  

sorry to say i was born 7 years after steam finished on the old GE .....im 50 this year ... .. .

 

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15 hours ago, NXEA! said:

Any news on the BR and DCC sound versions? All very quiet. 

 

No further emails from Hattons since July and checking their website today it still says delivery between July and September 2019.

 

Oxford Rail still lists the loco as “Future” with no commitment to a date.

 

All quiet on the Great Eastern Front.

 

//Simon

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15 hours ago, NXEA! said:

Any news on the BR and DCC sound versions? All very quiet. 

I was told a few days ago, "next month or 2"

 

Paul

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An update from Hattons today on my pre-order for an early BR livery round top boiler N7:

 

“Our latest information from the supplier suggests this item will arrive with us between October 2019 & December 2019

Whilst we are hopeful this information is accurate, manufacturer lead times are frequently prone to be delayed.”

 

I assume that there must be a lot of Belpaire firebox models still sitting on trader’s shelves but on the +ve side it’s edged into the Christmas present window.

 

Jag är insnöad på östfronten

 

//Simon

Edited by Stentor
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Today I finally got round to renumbering my 8011 to 7998. It still needs some light weathering, but at least it is now in the correct number group having Westinghouse (engine and train) and Vacuum ejector (train) brakes, as were 102 N7s in total. It begs the question as to why Oxford used the 8000-8011 number series? Wrong, but the model is fitted with the pipework allowing a renumber from a larger selection, without any butchery, up to February 1938, when condensing apparatus was finally removed. RCTS part 9A, pages 112, 121-123 refers.

 

Tod

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10 hours ago, SweenyTod1 said:

Today I finally got round to renumbering my 8011 to 7998. It still needs some light weathering, but at least it is now in the correct number group having Westinghouse (engine and train) and Vacuum ejector (train) brakes, as were 102 N7s in total. It begs the question as to why Oxford used the 8000-8011 number series? Wrong, but the model is fitted with the pipework allowing a renumber from a larger selection, without any butchery, up to February 1938, when condensing apparatus was finally removed. RCTS part 9A, pages 112, 121-123 refers.

 

Tod

 

N7s can be a minefield when it comes to potential renumbering.  Are the only visible differences between the batch that included 7998 and the 8000-11 batch as built, the vacuum ejector pipe along the boiler and the vacuum train pipes on the buffer beams?

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7 hours ago, 31A said:

 

N7s can be a minefield when it comes to potential renumbering.  Are the only visible differences between the batch that included 7998 and the 8000-11 batch as built, the vacuum ejector pipe along the boiler and the vacuum train pipes on the buffer beams?

 

 

In short, my answer to you, is yes. As far as I can see from photos and text in Part 9A RCTS, all N7s had the W+VE system, apart from the 8000-11 (Westinghouse only and the Beardsmore built, 2642-2661, steam brake (loco) and vacuum ejector (train). So even the VE pipe should be seen on the latter. Agreed , it is a minefield. Conversion to other brake systems, push-pull and round topped fireboxes is outside my modelling period, so not relevant here.

If there are any "experts" out there willing to put their heads above the parapet, please feel free to join in. I believe the model represents 102 out of a total of 134 N7s from 1923 up to 1938, so why Oxford chose the 12 locos that didn't have a vacuum pipe is the mystery. They obviously don't read the books that I do!!!

Perhaps they should............?

Tod

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Off the top of my head that sounds about right - there were batch differences with things like lubricator type and location that could be a trap?

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I wouldn't claim to be an expert, but I'll stick my head over the parapet nonetheless.

 

As far as I can see the Oxford model of 8011 is good for 7990-9 from the late 20s when they received two extra coal-rails on the bunker, to the early to mid 30s, when, at various times, the the wooden cab roof was replaced by steel, bunkerside footsteps were fitted and the condensing gear removed.

 

Minus the ejector pipe and vacuum brake hoses, it will also do for 8002-11.

 

8000/1 had a higher cab roof profile that they kept all their lives, and they retained the different position of the Westinghouse pump until after they lost their condensing gear.

 

All the later engines were left hand drive, and had the ejector pipe on the other side (and lower down).  In addition, N7/2 and N7/3 had taller bunkers, the cabside window further forward and long-travel valve gear, necessitating tail rod covers (visible just below the smokebox).  N7/3s also had round-topped fireboxes of course.

 

In fairness to Oxford, it is, as noted above, a minefield, and listing all the detail variations between engines, and over time, would keep you busy for a while.  The important thing, the way I see it, is that the basic model absolutely captures the look of an N7.

Edited by Darryl Tooley
wrong numbers
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3 hours ago, SweenyTod1 said:

 

 

In short, my answer to you, is yes. As far as I can see from photos and text in Part 9A RCTS, all N7s had the W+VE system, apart from the 8000-11 (Westinghouse only and the Beardsmore built, 2642-2661, steam brake (loco) and vacuum ejector (train). So even the VE pipe should be seen on the latter. Agreed , it is a minefield. Conversion to other brake systems, push-pull and round topped fireboxes is outside my modelling period, so not relevant here.

If there are any "experts" out there willing to put their heads above the parapet, please feel free to join in. I believe the model represents 102 out of a total of 134 N7s from 1923 up to 1938, so why Oxford chose the 12 locos that didn't have a vacuum pipe is the mystery. They obviously don't read the books that I do!!!

Perhaps they should............?

Tod

 

Thank you; that's interesting to know and agrees with what I thought.  I'm more interested in the BR period myself, but have been reading the RCTS and Yeadon's to see whether I any of the models released so far would be suitable to be repainted into BR livery.  It's been an interesting exercise .... 

 

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Thank you for all your comments, all very valid. We all agree that that it's a great model, certainly capturing the N7, well made, plenty of grunt to haul prototypical loads etc. If Oxford had presented it in the 7990-9 batch, perhaps this conversation may not have happened? So far, 35 pages of chat and no doubt it will continue. I have made my point about the numbering, altered my loco to suit, so I'm happy with it. There I will leave the topic and wish you all, Happy modelling and good night, sleep tight and make sure the details don't bite!!

 

Tod

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Oxford Rail has produced photo's of OR76N7004 the BR Late Crested painted sample, looks pretty good I must say. Still waiting on a round-topped LNER Lined N7, might get that out next year... I hope...

69672421_2391380527740917_948289248077807616_n.jpg

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Those couplings stick out a bit, don't they!

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1 hour ago, The Johnster said:

Those couplings stick out a bit, don't they!

A suitable candidate for some kadee's I think !

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1 hour ago, The Johnster said:

Those couplings stick out a bit, don't they!

They do. The one at the rear is awkward because the axle is right where an NEM coupler pocket needs to be. The front one has to be put down to inexperience on the part of the designer, a much superior implementation was possible. OR are new to this game and not the first to mess up in this wise.

 

But - cheekily speaking for all drysiders - we are the superior breed; both appreciative of anything that's offered suitable for our interest, and fully capable of rectifying any small shortcomings. So no complaints, we've a competent model of an N7 and all is well with our world.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Black 5 Bear said:

A suitable candidate for some kadee's I think !

Back should be OK with a #17 or #18 from the look of it, but the front one sticks out so far that even a #17 is likely to be too long.

 

That's going to be a candidate for shortening the pocket and the clip, and fixing the coupler in place with a drop of superglue.

 

Tension-lockers will need to rummage through their bits box for some shorter ones off something else.

 

John

Edited by Dunsignalling
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I’ve had my BR N7 on order for an age. 10 months? But seeing that pic has really cheered me up - what a beautiful model! Thanks for posting. Can’t wait for delivery. :D

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