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Oxford N7


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13 hours ago, Flying Pig said:

Are the cab front spectacles quite right on the round-top model?  Shouldn't the lower edge follow the curve of the firebox?  These look unchanged from the belpaire version.

 

Looking at photos I think you are right. Not sure nowadays they would go to the effort of changing the shape of a window when changing from something square to circular!

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14 hours ago, The Doc said:

Has anyone had a problem with the rear wheels derailing on their model?  Mine is okay when running bunker first, but when running forwards the trailing axle (unpowered) derails at several places on my layout....My track-laying may not be perfect, but other locos manage fine 9 times out of 10.  I've checked the back to back measurements and no problems there, but I wonder if the vertical springing on the rear axle is not strong enough...

Without being too critical, '9 out of 10' if true implies track that really isn't good enough. Spring adjustment (on both the locos mentioned) and possibly available vertical travel adjustment on the N7 (the wheelset may need to be able to fall a little further) may help, but really attention to your track is called for...

 

The 2 examples I have are completely reliable on my layout in both directions, but there's nothing more testing than a 24" rad curve in a yard location at slow speed, and other than that they are on 30" minimum radius curves/Peco medium radius and 3' radius kit built points, or larger.

 

16 minutes ago, Bucoops said:

... Not sure nowadays they would go to the effort of changing the shape of a window when changing from something square to circular!

It's a reflection of the fact that in substituting a round top for a belpaire boiler, much of the spectacle plate would necessarily be renewed to fit, and quite possibly all of it. Steam locos were handbuilt, 'bespoke' in this respect, and rather like 'Trigger's broom'; in that the assembly at end of life might contain very few of the component parts that were first erected under that build number.

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12 minutes ago, 34theletterbetweenB&D said:

Without being too critical, '9 out of 10' if true implies track that really isn't good enough. Spring adjustment (on both the locos mentioned) and possibly available vertical travel adjustment on the N7 (the wheelset may need to be able to fall a little further) may help, but really attention to your track is called for...

 

The 2 examples I have are completely reliable on my layout in both directions, but there's nothing more testing than a 24" rad curve in a yard location at slow speed, and other than that they are on 30" minimum radius curves/Peco medium radius and 3' radius kit built points, or larger.

 

It's a reflection of the fact that in substituting a round top for a belpaire boiler, much of the spectacle plate would necessarily be renewed to fit, and quite possibly all of it. Steam locos were handbuilt, 'bespoke' in this respect, and rather like 'Trigger's broom'; in that the assembly at end of life might contain very few of the component parts that were first erected under that build number.

 

Yes but it would involve new castings/fabrications for the glass to sit in. Mind you, the larger glass would mean a little more visibility so maybe that's why they went to the effort?

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1 hour ago, Bucoops said:

...Yes but it would involve new castings/fabrications for the glass to sit in. Mind you, the larger glass would mean a little more visibility so maybe that's why they went to the effort?

The traditional steam railway wasn't financially closely managed to the detail standard of more recent manufacturing industry, but largely operated on a 'custom and practise' basis. 'Since the move from round spectacle plate windows, our loco's spectacle plate window style for the inside quadrant is to follow the adjacent boiler profile'. Had all the means in plant and the trained craft skills workforce to design and make the required new components, so there was no hesitation in drawing up and making the new casting patterns for manufacture.

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The aspect of the N7 model that I am giving consideration is access to the cab interior to significantly overcoat the rather attractive cream finish with dirt. It looks very well, but it didn't last long unless the loco was a shed pet, and is more than a little eye-catching. Anyone here had the body in pieces and successfully reassembled? (I am a little hampered at present by a flare up of arthritis in the index and middle fingers of my dominant hand, which has frustrated having a go in my usual fashion, and a preview would ease the impatience.)

 

Operationally the new Swedey Mets continue to charm alongside the Big Mets, something of a little and large job. The two old kit N7s are now 'in works', and the early Wills kit version stripped and 'awaiting': thoughts/adaption/scrapping. The later one definitely to run again WIGATI.

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On 16/10/2019 at 18:23, stewartingram said:

Rails of Sheffield must have them in stock. I've just had an email stating that they have taken my payment.

 

Stewart

Picked mine up from Rails on Friday. I must say, excellent personal service. Spoken to by my Christian name (presumably from the on-line order. Asked if I wanted it tested when he got my box out, I said yes and he found the chimney loose so immediately got another box from out the back. Tested ok on the track. 

I'll be home later today (about 120 miles) to have a proper look at it. They will be getting my orders again!

 

Stewart

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On 10/10/2019 at 15:12, Chas Levin said:

Thanks Stewart; how do you ensure even pressure though? I'd be concerned that I might be applying slightly more force to one side (the side near the pliers' handles I would think) than the other and might distort the centre hole of the wheel, perhaps loosen it or put it off the perpendicular to the axle? Is it just a case of practice + confidence = success? 

 

 

I've just realised that I didn't reply to this, sorry.

Firstly, the pliers I use are Lindstrom, from work use many years ago. Other makes are of course available, as cheap as £2 each though! They are not electrical

pliers, but what we know as electronic pliers - a lot smaller. You can actually get some cheap from the likes of Boyes shops or at model exhibitions.

Being small, the blades will fit between the wheel and chassis block, either side of the axle. And you find the blades actually touch the back of the wheel all the way up. A little pressure on the handle towards the centreline of the loco and the wheel will pull outwards. Taking an older Hornby loco as example I usually go for the for the non-insulated wheel side, this pulls both the wheel and axle away from the other (insulated) wheel and keeps things straight. On some locos both wheels are plastic so you have to be a little more careful, but it is easy to do.

 

Stewart

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Regarding the front numberplate.

Way way back in an earlier incarnation of RMWeb, there was a discussion on printing your own on the PC. I did in fact play around with this but have lost the details. Does anyone have a copy, or can suggest what font & size to use?

 

Stewart

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On 26/10/2019 at 12:06, Bucoops said:

 

Yes but it would involve new castings/fabrications for the glass to sit in. Mind you, the larger glass would mean a little more visibility so maybe that's why they went to the effort?

 

Having looked at Yeadons,  RCTS "green" book and a number of photographs I have, the front spectacle plate does appear to very across the class of rebuild engines. I haven't yet found a photo of 69612 in the early 1950s livery to be that fussed to alter the loco. The arch above the access to the footplate doesn't seam as pronounced on the model as photos of rebuilt N7/GE, but again not anything I propose to alter. Another pernickety point is, I think in early 1950s the rear cab spectacle plate guard rails should only extend up 50% of the glass area. As for the chimney and dome, again there were so many variations, an early 1950s photo of the loco is required.

 

So far all I have changed is removal of the rod to the smokebox on the left hand side of the loco.

 

Overall as with the GER version, very pleased with the model and can we please have some more GER/East Anglian items (e.g. J19, F5 and a B2)

 

Paul

 

 

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10 hours ago, RAYTHEROCK said:

I second PaulG's suggestion - could a B2 be produced by combining B17 and B1 components - Hornby? For my money I'd still like a Buckjumper of some sort, as small engines appear to be in fashion.

 

I'm sure a "Buckjumper" would sell well, but for a model manufacturer it would be very difficult, with numerous variations over the J66/J67/J68/J69 class range.

 

Lyn Brooks has published a number of articles with photos and detailed drawings in the GERS Journal over the last 40 years, and even within say "Class J67" there are numerous variations.

 

Paul

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13 hours ago, RAYTHEROCK said:

I second PaulG's suggestion - could a B2 be produced by combining B17 and B1 components - Hornby?...

Strictly from the parts available, only the one B2 that retained an LNER group standard tender, LNER 2871 then  renumbered 1671, BR 61671, unless of course Hornby go on to do something NER that has a 'transferable' tender. Pretty straightforward as a DIY mash up of the two models.

 

I don't imagine Hornby will get around to a B2 any time soon, with three good LNER 4-6-0 models in the range, two of which look very much like a B2 to a casual glance. Within the LNER group, the B16 must be a more inviting subject. and if they want to introduce a new 4-6-0, tackle the Black 5 to the standard of their other more recently tooled 4-6-0s: N15, Castle, BR 4MT, 7P, 7P, B1, B17, King, S15, B12/3, LN, all of them way superior to their 'one size fits all' Black 5.

 

14 hours ago, RAYTHEROCK said:

... For my money I'd still like a Buckjumper of some sort, as small engines appear to be in fashion.

 

3 hours ago, PaulG said:

I'm sure a "Buckjumper" would sell well, but for a model manufacturer it would be very difficult, with numerous variations over the J66/J67/J68/J69 class range...

It's small, pretty enough, allocated to locations from Stratford to Scotland,  can carry very attractive GER, LNER and BR LNER and GER reference styled liveries, and only needs to be as 'difficult' as the manufacturer chooses. Research a version or two to cover properly, and there will be few complaints.

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On 27/10/2019 at 10:57, stewartingram said:

Regarding the front numberplate.

Way way back in an earlier incarnation of RMWeb, there was a discussion on printing your own on the PC. I did in fact play around with this but have lost the details. Does anyone have a copy, or can suggest what font & size to use?

 

Stewart

If you want a quick, quality and permanent solution, 247 developments have every N7 number available as an etch smokebox plate.  They are friendly and efficient, and I can recommend them as a satisfied customer, including  the smokebox plates they produce on demand, for numbers they don't already cover.

 

Tony

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It is not just the N7 I'm thinking of. I have a large number of loco plates I would like to do, banging up the cost! I'm also wanting to print bus destination blinds, so I couls actually economise on paper by filling the space available.

 

Stewart

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I started this thread on 24/01/17, now, two years and 9 months  later, my BR liveried example arrived. Like others, I am very pleased with the looks and performance of the model, and have personalised my example a little!

 N7_001.JPG.2326fb26a5a4a86dec185aa3de3c4e92.JPG

Cabside and window 'bling' removed, snifting valves, whistle and other brass brightware subdued! Condenser linkage removed, couplings shortened.

N7_002.JPG.7849622005456ad390c899052847ed02.JPG

Smokebox ring highlighted, Smokebox numberplate from Fox transfers, 38A (Colwick), shedplate!!

N7_003.JPG.cf7b93b772ac47ee66f917b53da1489d.JPG

A lovely model of a lovely prototype, I am well pleased. I have the relevant Yeadon on order, I would like to do 69621, is this model suitable?

Cheers from Oz,

Peter C.

 

 

 

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Some rather blurry shots of an N7 doing what they did, with a 'Quint' set. The set was built from a Kirk kit more years ago than I care to remember, it has been waiting for a suitable loco.

44807047_N7005(1024x768).jpg.bad1b7788221b4865ce04b50bbc83023.jpg

1912304872_N7006(1024x768).jpg.3041692aa7ef23ef6b644ac1830af52b.jpg

1916340027_N7010(1024x768).jpg.197854fad974f2813ce5d928ee87f6f9.jpg

1760352420_N7011(1024x768).jpg.723f167ee763f661da644fc3441f90b4.jpg

I will try harder next time!

Cheers from Oz,

Peter C.

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On 10/10/2019 at 20:04, RAYTHEROCK said:

Rather concerned that Chas Levin reports Oxford Rail have no repair facilities - I don't think Peter's Spares hold any spare parts for them either. Longterm this could lead to problems in keeping locos running.  (Hornby spares also seem to be in short supply).

 

Hoping to see my 69612 soon now - meantime has anyone a simple solution to those far too  long couplings?

 

 

We can only supply parts that we are offered by the supplier and as yet Oxford Rail haven't offered a list of spares. Thanks Peter 

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On 10/10/2019 at 14:00, Chas Levin said:

Hi all, my recently purchased N7 is a beautifully smooth & quiet runner but doesn't like some of the points or the diamond on my admittedly coarse track and non-prototypical layout: investigating, I found that the wheels are significantly under standard OO back-to-back.

I spend a lot of time building kits and am happy to repair older RTR stock but one decent tool I lack is a wheel-puller that could back the wheels off a tiny amount without needing full dismantling. Given how new the loco is, I asked Oxford whether they could help rectify and was told they have no servicing or repair facilities. Peters Spares didn't want to know either.

Has anyone else experienced this?

And can anyone recommend a suitable wheel-puller for this job please?

Thank you in advance, Chas :)

 

Hi there, I think 'didn't want to know' is a bit strong. We can't get parts and have never taken this new model apart so would not want to take on a job that could get worse rather than better. We were honest about this over the phone! Thanks Peter 

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6 minutes ago, PetersSpares said:

 

Hi there, I think 'didn't want to know' is a bit strong. We can't get parts and have never taken this new model apart so would not want to take on a job that could get worse rather than better. We were honest about this over the phone! Thanks Peter 

Hi Peter, apologies if my choice of words was a bit strong, but that was the feeling I got. You advertise as "Repair specialists" so I assumed that must mean that something as relatively simple as altering a B2B would be catered for and I was a little surprised by your response.

Also, with respect, we have never spoken by phone about this or anything else; I emailed you to ask if you'd look at the N7 B2B and you replied (cut and pasted from the emails):

"Hi there,

                If it’s new and wrong I would get oxford to rectify it under your guarantee."

I replied that Oxford had said they don't undertake Service work and to ask again if you'd consider having a look at it - you replied:

"Well we could try but e have no parts availability and if the wheels are scratched we would have to repaint them. Try getting it swapped where you got it from for one that may have a better back to back gauge."

I was about ready to give up but emailed one more time to ask if you could recommend a suitable wheel-puller and you replied:

"I don’t know where to get them from. Thanks Peter".

 

I have now got a G W Models wheel puller and once I've tried it out on some thing less pretty I'll tweak the N7 ;)

 

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On 27/10/2019 at 10:52, stewartingram said:

I've just realised that I didn't reply to this, sorry.

Firstly, the pliers I use are Lindstrom, from work use many years ago. Other makes are of course available, as cheap as £2 each though! They are not electrical

pliers, but what we know as electronic pliers - a lot smaller. You can actually get some cheap from the likes of Boyes shops or at model exhibitions.

Being small, the blades will fit between the wheel and chassis block, either side of the axle. And you find the blades actually touch the back of the wheel all the way up. A little pressure on the handle towards the centreline of the loco and the wheel will pull outwards. Taking an older Hornby loco as example I usually go for the for the non-insulated wheel side, this pulls both the wheel and axle away from the other (insulated) wheel and keeps things straight. On some locos both wheels are plastic so you have to be a little more careful, but it is easy to do.

 

Stewart

Thanks Stewart; I have various small / needle-nose pliers from electronics work too, so I'll investigate further; that being said, I have now got a G W Models wheel puller to try too, so there are a few items of stock I shall tweak, including the N7 :D

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Never before have I appreciated how difficult decisions must be made.

 

Months ago, just after release, I was dead keen to get this loco.  I even sold another to put the funds towards it!  But during the wait for the black liveries, I got more and more disinterested and now it's become a missed sale.

 

I guess the other problem would be releasing them all together means someone may buy their favourite one first, then not bother with the rest.

 

Hard choice.

Still admire it when I see it in videos though.

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Did someone ask about these locomotives ever operating freight trains? I have just obtained an old booklet on the Chingford branch and in there is a photo dated 6 May 1939 of LNER no. 967 on a freight train. The train itself is entirely of vans but appears to be unfitted. 

PS the loco has a Belpair firebox and a Westinghouse pump.

Edited by PhilJ W
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I had a bit of a "how?" moment when I opened up my one - how do you fit a dcc decoder in. But it seems a Zimo MX600R fits fine with black-tac holding it to the underside of the bunker and the excess cable coiled up below.

 

Simples :)

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The significantly larger Lenz Standard fits too, even with the bunker void necessarily lined with insulating tape to prevent a short, but is significantly more awkward to 'pack in'. Having used the Zimo MX600 on the second one (the good board layout makes for a very easy hardwiring job) that will be my preference for the third. Both decoders run the mechanism beautifully, although to my surprise the Zimo makes the motor 'sing' pretty audibly at dead slow. Maybe I can adjust for that, all I have done so far is get the motor response effectively linear: the motors very 'peaky' on DC test on both my examples with a fairly unusual speed curve adjustment required as a result, CV6 circa 130, CV5 circa 160, to get 30mph at speed step 14, 60mph at step 28. (Settings on the two different decoders within about 5 steps of each other for matched running.)

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