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Just having another look at that photo it looks to me (although I could be wrong) that the ploughs are mounted to the chassis. Which prompted the thought that if the ploughs were mounted to the bogie via the NEM socket would they foul on a chassis mounted wider wire loop? Just a thought. 

Over to you Sir.

 

Andy

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In terms of snowploughs I would much prefer to hang them from the chassis rather than the bogie as Bachmann's normal ploughs work. It is not just the radius of curves but also the likelihood of damaging any detailing with a plough swinging around on a chassis. The same can be said for tension lock couplings hence my desire to find a better solution. Whilst I have seen some people modify the Bachmann ploughs and hang them from the bufferbeam, I have found that there is limited space to do this. PH Designs do a folded aluminium set of ploughs designed to hang from the bufferbeam but I have not summond up the courage to try these yet.

 

Yesterday I did a little airbrush work. I had intended to do more but in a clumsy moment I managed to drop a full tin of Humbrol enamel paint on to the carpet which meant I spent more time cleaning the carpet than I did airbrushing. Having looked this morning I seem to have done an OK job on the cleaning although the loft stinks of white spirit. The Humbrol paint was for two aluminium hoppers which needed a darker grey. Fortunately there was enough paint left over to complete a coat on them and they are now a good match for the rest of the hopper fleet. 

 

Hoppers waiting paint, I shall stick to the larger Railmatch bottles in future as they are easier to work with!

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Duly painted, there is a small imperfection on one of the wagons which I am not concerned about 

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1908369721_270520019.JPG.070ba760c9410c36ea723d490792bee8.JPG

 

Reunited with their chassis

1136292576_270520025.JPG.0b8eb3cdf81d9ed0d7ca39bb18706180.JPG

Old and the new, the hopper to the left is in the original colour applied 20 years ago and weathered, the one to the right is newly painted and unweathered. 

 

1200551252_270520026.JPG.54cf6e43cd3562fc315458f9115a8efd.JPG

 

 

   

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2 hours ago, young37215 said:

*snip*

 

Yesterday I did a little airbrush work. I had intended to do more but in a clumsy moment I managed to drop a full tin of Humbrol enamel paint on to the carpet which meant I spent more time cleaning the carpet than I did airbrushing. Having looked this morning I seem to have done an OK job on the cleaning although the loft stinks of white spirit. The Humbrol paint was for two aluminium hoppers which needed a darker grey. Fortunately there was enough paint left over to complete a coat on them and they are now a good match for the rest of the hopper fleet. 

 

*snip*   

Rob,

 

I can imagine the problems on the carpet:angry:. I'm not a fan of those Humbrol tins either:bad:. They are hard to open and the simple act of using the paint usually causes it to become clogged on the rim of the tin.

 

I watched a YouTube channel (about repairing horse drawn wagons actually) and he never shakes a tin of paint. Keep the paint off from the lid and rim if at all possible. He only stirs his paint, and has a special funnel that fits on the tin rim to keep the paint clear of it.

 

At least you successfully airbrushed the wagons, and they do look good. I haven't summoned the courage to even take my airbrush set out of its box:laugh:. It's been there for over 2-years. It's only a cheap one from Aldi, so I expect to have to buy a better airbrush in the future, but it will probably do for my early practising - whenever that occurs. Out of curiosity, which airbrush are you using?

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Posted (edited)

Ian

 

The Humbrol tin was well stirred before gravity added to my stirring! I agree that the tins are cumbersome and the collection of paint in the rim has always been an inconvenience. Dropping the tin only adds to amount of paint in the rim, I shall dispose of it and the few other Humbrol tins once I am satisfied that the hoppers are complete. What irritates me more than anything is that I invariably place newspaper under the work bench when I am painting despite having never had an accident before. The one day I did'nt put the paper down is the day I drop the paint. 

 

My airbrush is an Iwata Neo bought at Warley a couple of years ago after speaking for a few seconds with George Dent . His words of wisdom were do'nt expect a cheap airbrush to perform well, if you are going to buy one make it a decent one. I paid £200 for the brush, a compressor and some cleaning items from Eileens who had a show offer on. It took me several months to build up the confidence to use it and only after I had read Dent's book Airbrushing for Railway Modellers. I recommend that you spray some track with sleeper grime or similar to get familiar because, in my experience it is virtually impossible to get this wrong and you will quickly get the feel of how the brush delivers paint.  My only advice is to make sure your paint is well thinned before you start, like many others I find a 50/50 paint thinner mix works well.

 

I managed to get some focus yesterday and started on Fort William where I connected all remaining track and 4 of the 6 points to the power BUS. I soldered about 20 joints in total, it never fails to surprise me how many joints are required. I also managed to connect a couple of point motors albeit without doing the frog wiring. I was also able to review Wednesday nights airbrusing where I matt varnished the blue area on the sides of several of the recently cleaned coaches. There is room for improvment but overall I am quite pleased, the new coach number transfers are clearly sealed and the scratches are much less visible than before. 

 

It's a golf day today so limited modelling time and little likelihood of progress. 

 

BCK before cleaning and varnishing, scratching is clearly visible

1570801558_165020033.JPG.205bb151fb04fa7fe58aa1c313ba9d54.JPG

BCK after work, the varnish reduces the visibility of the scratching beneath the toilet window

1612661642_270520022.JPG.e23b164f4cea41209f178dc3d1e35011.JPG

SK cleaned, renumbered and varnished

 

85223004_270520027.JPG.fc791276e407bdd662668c00b676a089.JPG

1692459618_270520028.JPG.82e788a8822f28f2a4a6c36d1c585f8d.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by young37215
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3 hours ago, young37215 said:

*snip*

 

SK cleaned, renumbered and varnished

 

85223004_270520027.JPG.fc791276e407bdd662668c00b676a089.JPG

 

Rob,

 

According to my RCTS coach books your SK was M24023 from 1976 to 1980. It only made it to Scotland in 1981. Bogies are correct (B1) and is a good choice being dual heated.

 

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Posted (edited)

My reference guide for stock numbering is my 1982 Platform 5 Coaching Stock book. I use Railtech transfers where, in addition to their BR Blue Scotrail passenger code 3094 product, I had a custom set of numbers of Cowlairs allocated stock made up based on my P5. There are plenty of transfers left to allow me to clean and renumber a further 5 poorly weathered coaches.

 

I usually manage to find a left field summer project which allows me a little modelling time as and when I feel the need. This year and in addition to the ongoing weathering removal programme, I have started removing the top 3 of the 5 steps on each of the mark 1 coach ends. I am not certain when these got removed but they were history by the time of my early 1980's era. It is a simple enough task but in total it is a bit of a faff as I have 24 Mk1's which at 6 per coach totals 144 steps. These are removed using a sharp scapel balde which is then sanded flat using my cheap utility tool. A blast of paint either by airbrush or by hand to cover the work and weathering as required completes the job. So far I have removed the steps from half of the fleet so there is plenty of work left for Doug and his Dremel. 

 

The bog standard Bachmnann Mk1 coach end

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Steps removed by scalpel leaves a rough finish

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Steps area sanded flat

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Finished coach end

1495459425_270520024.JPG.4459d3a08e9ec721778fe6f26477b01c.JPG

A cheap utility tool is perfect for this job (the sweet tin full of drill bits, not chocolate)

409703255_290520001.JPG.7b316fbd2619203f5cf596fbfffaa134.JPG 

Edited by young37215
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1 hour ago, young37215 said:

I usually manage to find a left field summer project which allows me a little modelling time as and when I feel the need. This year and in addition to the ongoing weathering removal programme, I have started removing the top 3 of the 5 steps on each of the mark 1 coach ends. I am not certain when these got removed but they were history by the time of my early 1980's era. It is a simple enough task but in total it is a bit of a faff as I have 24 Mk1's which at 6 per coach totals 144 steps. These are removed using a sharp scapel balde which is then sanded flat using my cheap utility tool. A blast of paint either by airbrush or by hand to cover the work and weathering as required completes the job. So far I have removed the steps from half of the fleet so there is plenty of work left for Doug and his Dremel. 

 

The bog standard Bachmnann Mk1 coach end

 

Steps removed by scalpel leaves a rough finish

1376648634_165020030.JPG.38da999dedc4f00b79e08f89ee79d272.JPG

 

 

Rob,

 

Instead of using a scalpel knife, why not use some side-cutters (Xuron or similar) to remove the surplus steps. The side-cutters will leave a much neater, and possibly flush, cut thus reducing the painful sanding process. If space precludes Xurons, then some straight nail cutters would do the job.

 

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22 hours ago, ISW said:

Instead of using a scalpel knife, why not use some side-cutters (Xuron or similar) to remove the surplus steps. The side-cutters will leave a much neater, and possibly flush, cut thus reducing the painful sanding process. If space precludes Xurons, then some straight nail cutters would do the job.

 

Thanks Ian 

 

Good idea, I have an old pair of side cutters with damaged blades that take the steps of much quicker and more easily than the scalpel. The curvature of the coach end prevents a completly flush cut so some sanding is still required but the net effect is a much quicker process per step. Multiplied by the 72 steps that remain to be removed and it will be quite an overall time saving. 

 

Yesterday I managed to connect all of the remaining wiring at Fort William and by the time I finished, 4 of 5 point motors had been set up and were working. The 5th was being a pain in the rear, I think I misaligned the installation and so after swearing and cursing for far too long I gave up. Hopefully today I wil be able to sort this out before testing it all works prior to reinstalling the section on the layout. 

 

There are now groups of coaches dotted around in various stages of refurbishment. First the slowly shrinking pile of coaches awaiting cleaning, renumbering and step removal

1315126083_270520001.JPG.693e1c2f1389ef17ecdbc66f0dd511dc.JPG

Coaches cleaned, renumbered and waiting for a coat of matt varnish 

1840634381_270520020.JPG.1dc0c247bef54cf692266bfc8fa2a76c.JPG

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1 hour ago, young37215 said:

*snip*

 

Yesterday I managed to connect all of the remaining wiring at Fort William and by the time I finished, 4 of 5 point motors had been set up and were working. The 5th was being a pain in the rear, I think I misaligned the installation and so after swearing and cursing for far too long I gave up. Hopefully today I wil be able to sort this out before testing it all works prior to reinstalling the section on the layout. 

 

*snip*

 

Rob,

 

I usually find that when that happens to me the cause is the hole in the baseboard. I have to drill the holes before the turnout is installed, so there is a potential for a slight misalignment. A quick use of the reamer drill bit fixes that problem.

 

I find installing the servo (in the MegaPoints / B&Q aluminium 'U' channel) to be straightforward. I only install a fixing screw in the 'U' channel at the rear of the servo. Then it can be easily swung from side-to-side until it's in the right position. Then I install the other 'U' channel fixing screw at the drive end of the servo. I used to mark the centreline of the 'U' channel on the underside of the baseboard to get the location, but it was always a few mm off.

 

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Oh what fun it is aligning and wiring point motors. Using the now defunct Alurailtech brackets has proven straightforward and reliable most of the time on WHL4. With the point in situ I mark the centre point of the tie bar hole, the point is then removed and a 2mm hole drilled. The actuating wire is threaded through the baseboard from underneath and the bracket is screwed in place and then removed to allow for a larger 6mm hole to be drilled. The bracket is reattached using the same screw holes which should align the actuating wire in the correct place to pass through the tie bar. There is a little flexibility from the 0.6mm piano wire used as an actuator for less than perfect alignment and normally the job takes less time than it has for me to type out this explanation. On this occasion the problem was simply down to a poor installation.

 

After a quick resolution to the alignment problem it then took me more time than it should have to finish off the frog polarity wiring. I finally got to the stage where the 5 point motors at Fort William were all doing what they should and the directional lights were indicating the correct direction of the point on the control panel. Once again though I could have made a programme, possibly even a series, on school boy errors and how to make them.

 

I managed to run a loco around the station to test and was pleased when everything was finally up and running as I wanted. I will weather the track before returning the station to the layout and ballasting it in situ. I am still undecided about what the platform facing should be made of, Peco’s standard concrete offering is perfectly acceptable visually when weathered but it needs about 3mm of height removing to reduce it to the prototypical level. That translates to about 3 metres of cutting with a sharp craft knife which is laborious and fraught with danger both to my fingers and cutting off too much of the facing. I can’t think of an alternative and am not looking forward to the activity.

 

After dog walking duties this morning, it’s a golf day today meaning little likelihood of any serious modelling time which makes sense given how pleasant the weather continues to be. Hopefully by tomorrow I will have got a clearer picture on my head of how I will finish off the remainder of Fort William.

   

An Alurailtech bracket in situ, it is a shame that these are no longer being produced as they provide a secure base for servos

 

1842645897_Controlpanelfinished001(7).JPG.a7c342d1005c0442ca8f4ba562db2255.JPG

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Fort William has seen the track weathered and then ballasted. I am disappointed with the outcome of the ballasting because a combination of the PVA glue and dust on the ballast has left a residue on the rails and sleepers which I think will need a further covering of paint to resolve.

 

The ballast is from Geoscenics whose brown colour has been used across the rest of the layout. I used their dirty grey n guage which looks much like that I have seen in pictures and reflects the fact that Fort William Station was less than 10 years old in my early 1980’s era. Hopefully all will be well with a little more painting.

 

B741C96C-3A78-451E-AFDB-4F5C53EEF17E.jpeg.286c99553ce60a072d99ffb4686100aa.jpeg

 

8F6001AE-40D9-4282-AED9-7D12E414E52C.jpeg.f894cb85a0be8bbf3984abc8bdc5a0c0.jpeg

 

7A293527-C18E-44A2-8709-0092D1177BED.jpeg.e6ce3925301001493ed172bdb9da9776.jpeg7460D794-444C-4C4A-800C-B6BA101F3E7E.jpeg.7ba304bdf3e1d09f94ce8d7534d1a872.jpeg

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That’s a pity.

Hopefully you will be able to redeem it.

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Rob,

 

Were you, perhaps, at the bottom of the jar of ballast and that simply included all the dust particles? If so, then that's a lesson we all need to learn.

 

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13 hours ago, ISW said:

Rob,

 

Were you, perhaps, at the bottom of the jar of ballast and that simply included all the dust particles? If so, then that's a lesson we all need to learn.

 

Hi Ian 

 

Good idea but it is not the answer. Geoscenics ballast is supplied in a plastic bag which I simply pour directly into the spreader. I only used about half the bag meaning I doubt that I have got the dregs. I have not experienced this with the brown ballast, I think it is just a feature of this colour.  If I use anymore of it I will rinse it before application in the hope that water cleans the dust away. I was planning to paint the 4' darker to reflect the grot and rubbish from trains standing in the station, this will just have to be a more extensive painting session than I planned.  

 

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Posted (edited)

Less modelling at present than of late but I am still active on a couple of projects. I have removed the steps from all bar 2 coaches, 24 in total which amounts to 144 steps removed. Coach ends have all been sanded, painted and are starting to be re-formed into their rakes. The WHL timetable requires 6 rakes of stock, mine are all load 4 making them interchangeable in theory. However from the multitide of pictures that I have looked at Oban trains always appeared to have more than 1 brake coach so I have 2 in each of my Oban rakes and 1 in each of the Mallaig rakes.    

 

The last of the sanded and painted coach ends are drying

62742888_130620002.JPG.5a2c8a18227cbb0bc2634e610a3c1746.JPG

Coaches are being reformed into rakes back on the layout 

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Tail lamps have been fitted at both ends of the rake 

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The last 5 of the poorly weathered coaches to clean

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TSO duly broken down to clean the sides, I have added a few more passengers as I have plenty left over. Do'nt want to over do it though, trains were rarely busy.

1440546737_130620022.JPG.7167f1eb5d386400591c6be3950b3c15.JPG

B*!t*rd screws that secure the bogie to the chassis and the chassis to the coach body are cheap rubbish and easily damaged. I really want to find replacements so that I have a stock of spares rather than having to re-use the knackered ones. Suggestions welcomed!

1571007145_130620024.JPG.31fb4fdd9cc927fb623d93308f24f173.JPG

Bodysides of freshly cleaned coaches which will be renumbered and varnished once dry. The Replica Scotrail stickers are proving remarkably resilient and reluctant to come off.

2053276339_130620030.JPG.c4068e1b593c63d77bbbed07b49b3de5.JPG

 

Edited by young37215
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Today I managed to apply Railtect transfers to the cleaned up coaches. The coach fleet is now all numbered once more with just a handful requiring matt varnishing to seal the new numbers. That will be the end of this mini programme of work which has proved to be more of a success than I had hoped for. The cleaned up coaches are not spotless, rather they retain pockets of dirt in areas that cleaning can not easily acesss just as is the case with carriage washers on the real railway. I am delighted with the results, a big thank you to Mr Everard Junction for his discovering how to clean up the coaches. 


I am now planning a major offensive on the painting front with varnishing, wagon and coach frames, coach roof's and Fort William station rail all scheduled for work. By doing this much work in one go I feel less aggrieved about the time it takes to clean the air brush once finished. 

 

Dirt surrounds the window frames and coach ends on BCK 21269

 

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Renumbered SK 24436 waits for a coat of varnish to seal the transfers. Again the dirt around and on the windows and doors looks believable.  

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2026846518_140620004.JPG.8ffa920456b79bd0af9f275d1448652c.JPG

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Posted (edited)

Renumbering completed on 2 class 37's, what was 37022 has been cleaned and become 37085 in original condition complete with the RSH cantrail grill dividers. Detailing still required and a blast of matt varnish to finish. The current 37085 is looking for a new identity, probably as 37111 for no better reason than because I have 37111 transfers. I do'nt intend cleaning this loco, it was professionally weathered by Grimy Times. My intention is to remove as little weathering as possible to renumber and blend in the new number and data panel as best I can. 37192 has become 37175, replacement buffers, data panel transfers which I am waiting for from Railtec and detailing are still outstanding.

 

1591171002_140620013.JPG.6eb3650f0a9ca1b9081858b6038f6bfa.JPG

1518575796_140620011.JPG.490adde546b1e0bdfb1a7f4f65efa5fa.JPG

 

520935290_140620014.JPG.031d59afa5b19db8dcf9f55e192b87c1.JPG

 

 

37017 requires repairs on the headcode panel and the headlight replacing. I attempted to clean the lamp optic of the headcode because the light was barely visible even on the maximum setting but despite using a cotton bud and best efforts to be careful, I managed to destroy the glazed element. I have several potential replacement panels but none fit as well as the existing panel! I am wondering if I can find a suitable glue or similar fluid that will dry opaque yet still allow light through to repair rather than replace the headlight. Any advice gratefully received

 

1575793568_140620015.JPG.cbfd5055eed24a55d89d0b5e306e2c1d.JPG

 

 

 

Edited by young37215
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One thing to watch with doing 111 is that it has a smooth roof- I can’t make out from the pic whether yours has or not (mainly coz it’s no 1 end that’s nearest the camera!) 

 

Loving the work on the Mk1 coaches Rob, it’s inspired me to dig out mine to rework them. I’m going to have two pairs for use on Kilchoan West (the portable layout) so going to need to work out numbers for the non-Scottish ones I have. 
 

Cheers
 

 

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2 hours ago, Eddie R v2.0 said:

One thing to watch with doing 111 is that it has a smooth roof- I can’t make out from the pic whether yours has or not (mainly coz it’s no 1 end that’s nearest the camera!) 

 

 

Dam, you are correct. I had missed the roof point. My old 37085 was originally 37049 and has the rivetted roof. Choices of renumber now down to 37022 or 37037 where I have transfers to do either. 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, young37215 said:

 

Dam, you are correct. I had missed the roof point. My old 37085 was originally 37049 and has the rivetted roof. Choices of renumber now down to 37022 or 37037 where I have transfers to do either. 

 

 


Personally I’d do 037 as it seemed to be a regular on the Oban line. Don’t really remember 022 that much but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t! 
 

Really wish I’d taken more note of the locos and stock that arrived in Oban, after all, I spent most days in the summer either down at the station or out at my Granny’s in Taynuilt! 

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Re the headlight - might you be able to punch out a circle or greaseproof or tracing paper sealed in with ‘glue and glaze’ or something similar?

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23 hours ago, BoD said:

Re the headlight - might you be able to punch out a circle or greaseproof or tracing paper sealed in with ‘glue and glaze’ or something similar?

 

Glue & Glaze is on my radar for this although I am not sure how clear it drys. I have not given up on using one of the other headcode plates that I have either. Watch this space....

 

The platform height of Fort William station has been reduced by a good 3mm to achieve a more prototypical height. To ensure that I retained all 10 of my fingers and thumbs, I managed to do the work with a razor saw rather than a craft knife. The platform has been extended in length and the Peco concrete facing weathered which will get ballasted into place once I have re-painted the rails and fitted the platform lights.  I have not yet decided how best to represent the lower level platform to the side of platform 1 (the one next to the road). I have always assumed this to be for servicing of rolling stock although have never seen it in use. I need something about 8mm high to do this, I am currently thinking some dowling with a plasticard platform surface.

 

Finally the old 37085 will become 37022 and what is currently 37108 will become 37037 after it is cleaned up. 37108 is ex 37049 again and therefore has a rivetted roof. I have the number transfers for both of these so it should not take to long to complete the renumbering programme. I still fancy a version of 37111 but this will have to wait until I find a suitable body shell.

 

Original platform height

26828033_130620013.JPG.8a47631d82947a7fafc9076a7ddc564b.JPG

revised platform height

286923195_130620027.JPG.4a2490e8c8a8661477292fe85e377320.JPG

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P1 and gap for services platform

1029174755_130620028.JPG.251aea608c067fb8ca4ef7d829866437.JPG

 

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No golf today due to the rain. I renumbered 37085 to 37022 and painted over the yellow axle box covers instead. Not exactly productive but it whiled away an hour or two by the time I had fitted the MU cables and screwed the body shell back together. By masking off the body so that I only disturbed the weathering on top of the old number, the area to re-weather is modest. A little dirty wash on top of the new number and I hope to be done.

 

9DB4C994-1DE8-403D-B0FC-2A6F1D050AC1.jpeg.bcb39f369b4aa8ed693908bf7346bac2.jpeg

 

EC53AA25-6E4B-43D3-8972-3E65E236342C.jpeg.e462a543f937f9a909ebd97ecddad3ac.jpeg83490477-D4BD-4700-8D79-DCD8A67908CD.jpeg.770f8587a383736c9cf057ed1e8e26b5.jpeg

 

 

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4 hours ago, young37215 said:

*snip*

A little dirty wash on top of the new number and I hope to be done.

 

9DB4C994-1DE8-403D-B0FC-2A6F1D050AC1.jpeg.bcb39f369b4aa8ed693908bf7346bac2.jpeg

 

 

 

Clean numbers are also prototypical, and I think it looks good 'as is' without further weathering.

 

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10 hours ago, ISW said:

Clean numbers are also prototypical, and I think it looks good 'as is' without further weathering.

 

 

A fair and valid point. To maximise the longevity of the transfers I want to seal them, maybe I will settle for a splash of matt varnish rather than try and blend the weathering. 

 

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