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Hello everyone!

 

This is my first own thread on RWeb, and I hope you'll all find it interesting enough to follow. The basic gist of this thread is to outline and trace the progress of my various projects that are ongoing in terms of rolling stock. As I'm a student I haven't got my own layout (yet) though I hope this will change in the summer as I may have space available at my grandmother's, with whom I live when I am not in term time at university (I'm studying quite far from home, hence the 'second home' with her.)

 

My proposed layout is to be set roughly around Hastings and Saint Leonards circa 1920-1930 which will give me scope for plenty of liveries, and for various forms of rolling stock in different stages of semi-standardisation or modification.

 

The projects currently standing are as follows:

 

  • ex LSWR K10 4-4-0 from a GBL T9 and Hornby spares
  • ex LSWR C8 4-4-0 from a GBL T9 and Hornby spares (this locomotive and the K10 were both transferred to the Eastern section during the early days of grouping for suitability trials, as well as a couple of T9s)
  • Pullman rake made up of two pre-1928 matchboard sides and one 1928 steel car (this will most likely be modified). Also in sights is a Railroad Pullman to be hacked and modified into an SECR Pullman similar to 'Topaz'.
  • Twelve wheel Pullman clerestory, similar in design to a Brighton Pullman car, possibly to be named 'Rye Harbour' or 'Hastings'
  • Five Maunsell restriction 1 or 0 coaches, four of which are the Graham Farish models. These are to be repainted and receive new corridor ends, possibly new bogies when finances allow. The old Hornby coach will need to be lowered in ride height, also, to match the others.
  • Pullman 'Pup' baggage car, from a toy my siblings gave me a few years ago and a scratch-built six wheel chassis.
  • Ex Wisbech and Upwell tramway coach for the Kent and East Sussex fictional extension of the line from Hastings via Tenterden to Ashford

 

I will hopefully upload some photos soon of these projects; granted my pace isn't the best but I try to work on these projects when I can. Obviously being a student presents an issue financially but I very rarely buy anything brand new; I prefer to improve what I can.

 

I am not a scale modeller by any means but I do strive for accuracy where it can be achieved. For instance, in terms of Maunsell bogie stock I will try to find any examples of low-window stock I can, and if these are of the 0/1 restriction, even better.

 

Liveries will be afforded a little imagination- I doubt Maunsell settled on a livery straight away for the railway post-war and so some slight deviations from the known olive scheme will be afforded, perhaps cream and olive on a coach or two, probably an old four or six wheel coach. The locomotives will be presented in all forms of liveries, wartime grey and black, weathered olive, umber, SECR fully-lined... I like variety, what can I say?

 

The interesting aspects of these projects will most likely be the lining (I do have a bow-pen) and the painting, which I hope to do with my airbrush (which has not left it's box yet... oh.)

 

Anyway, I look forward to keeping you all informed, and I hope to update this thread soon.

 

- Alexandra

 

Edited by AVS1998
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Bravo!

 

And welcome.

 

Sounds like a great project and I look forward to seeing something of it.

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Welcome.

 

Very interesting area/era that you've chosen.

 

A Pullman car named 'Rye Harbour' would definitely challenge the over-ostentatious image of such vehicles!

 

Kevin

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Your scale's a little too 'orribly oversized for me, but I'll still be watching with interest because the period matches mine and it'll be interesting to see your modelling work. You never know what detailing may be relevant for my own modelling.

 

Peter

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Hello!

 

As promised, here are some photos of a few of the projects I mentioned.

 

The C8

 

This locomotive started as a GBL T9, which I shortened in the firebox and footplate by 4mm - the C8 is a foot shorter than a T9, hence the shortening.

 

IMG_20170120_231103_zps8dkzefzp.jpg

 

IMG_20170120_231132_zps2jrdpdn2.jpg

 

The smokebox also had to be shortened, as the C8s (and the K10, which will be discussed later) were not superheated like their T9 successors. Having removed the smokebox door and then shortened the smokebox itself, I then cut a wingplate from black plasticard, fixed it to the smokebox and then reattached the door after removing the fixing ring behind it.

 

IMG_20170120_231156_zpsktbt53go.jpg

 

Moulded handrails and piping were sanded off, and any gaps filled- I'd like to think I did a fairly good job, but we'll see once it's in primer. I don't think the C8s received external waterpipes or injectors over the boiler, and so I will probably leave these off the finished model. From all the source material I could find on this class (which seems to be very camera -shy) I decided to keep the narrow cab and splashers. The tender might remain the full-size watercart, which would certainly be better on my finances seeing as how it already has the eight-wheel chassis...

 

Still needed to be sourced is the chimney, probably a Drummond design as seen on the M7s (which, interestingly, share their boiler with the C8s, 700s and K10s- bloody good standardisation, Mr Drummond!). The chassis will most likely be an adapted Hornby/Triang 1B12 affair, as I've seen others do on various threads on this forum. I'll use the Hornby T9 wheelset, and perhaps the bogie as well, or I'll find a bogie amongst Hornby spares that's the same spacing. The connecting rods will probably be the Hornby 0-4-0 spares- I checked the measurement and they are a scale 9', but I can't be sure of their fitting until I order some.

 

Livery will be early Maunsell olive green with the black/white lining and number on the tender. This locomotive will be allocated to light passenger and freight duties.

 

The K10

 

The K10 has its origins also in the GBL T9, however for the shortening I decided to cut the footplate at different places, and the boiler at the smokebox end, cutting the smokebox off entirely and reattaching following shortening. The K10s were not superheated and did not have wingplates and so the smokebox door could be reattached straight away.

 

As the class were fitted with wider cabs, I had a dilemma- do I make my own wider cab or do I find an etch to build the part?

 

Ultimately I saw the locomotive as an exercise in skills so I decided to order a Brassmasters T9 wide cab and splashers etch, which arrived quickly.

 

I had to shorten the splasher sides, as the whole locomotive is also a foot shorter than the T9, but this is where the problems began...

 

IMG_20170204_213324_zpso4la4cky.jpg

 

Even with a bracing piece behind the splasher, the two sides became unsoldered whenever I attempted to solder the splasher top to the side.... I managed one side but the other would not cooperate.

 

IMG_20170204_213340_zpsyr4ddtjc.jpg

 

Here is what the side was supposed to look like- I've traced the side onto plasticard and created spare sides, just in case. I'll probably give the etches one last go before I write them off entirely.

 

Again, still to be sourced is the chimney- Drummond design, a chassis (B12 altered), wheels (5'7'' drivers) and T9 bogie, and the chassis for the tender (six wheel, as seen on some T9s and the 700 class).

 

I will probably have this locomotive also in olive livery, but perhaps unlined on the locomotive, number on the cab side and Southern on the tender.

 

IMG_20170206_164414_zpsd0qqe5l1.jpg

 

 

IMG_20170206_164504_zpshyluszfd.jpg

 

This is it for how far these two locomotives have come so far, I hope to do more work soon.

 

In my next post I'll be discussing some of the coaching stock, and my ideas as to where to take them.

 

Thanks for reading,

 

Alex

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Part Two- Coaching Stock

 

Operating in the period and the area (Hastings/St Leonards) were, in the early days of the Grouping, ex SECR and LBSC four and six wheel coaches, their bogie equivalents, and (perhaps) SECR Continental and 100 seat bogie coaches. I'm doubtful that Brighton Balloon stock made its way this far east, but if it did then I would be tempted to find second-hand models of the Bachmann 'Railway Children' coaches, or possibly the Hornby/Triang Caledonian stock in its Caley livery (to me this looks quite close to the Brighton livery).

 

Also operating towards the end of the 1920s would be the Hastings '0' restriction Maunsells which are, apparently, similar to Hornby's 20th century offerings.

 

IMG_20170224_155033_zps2pcgqvsh.jpg

 

I have one Hornby 'old' Maunsell, which I have looked into improving and the most straightforward way of improvement seems to be this:

 

  • fit roof vents
  • change the coach ends (these are drop-in) and fit Pullman corridor connections
  • change the bogies for Maunsell standards and lower the ride height
  • repaint the exterior into olive and lining; paint in window frames and droplights in brown
  • paint the interior and designate the compartments correctly (4x first and 3x third as opposed to the current 3x first, 4x third)
  • reglazing with SE-Finecast kits

IMG_20170224_155048_zps9utloqfz.jpg

 

Either side of the Hornby offering are two of the Graham Farish corridor coaches; these also look fairly decent for their age and are dimensionally the same as the Hornby coach, albeit with lower ride heights and hence are the reason for lowering the Hornby ride height.

 

These coaches can be improved with:

 

  • An external repaint and lining
  • Reglazing
  • Painting the interior
  • More accurate roof vents
  • Pullman corridor connections
  • Maunsell standard bogies
  • Underframe detailing

 

These five coaches (four GraFar and one Hornby) should make a nice rake for Hastings-London services. More 'local' services can be run with the older bogie stock and smaller coaches, possibly made up from Ratio Midland bogie coaches (I've read they are quite similar to the Brighton items once painted and slightly modified). The Bachmann Thomas 'red coaches' are fair representations of Brighton stock so a few of these could be acquired and repainted, also.

 

IMG_20170224_195730_zps1sq3l2iq.jpg

 

IMG_20170224_195756_zpsvkgneft0.jpg

 

I do have a Bachmann 'Henrietta', the prototype of which was the Wisbech and Upwell tram coach. I've repainted mine into dark olive green with a dark grey roof and wooden window frames; not sure if I'll line it yet. This coach will be used for line inspection and also on the proposed (but fictitious) Hastings-Tenterden-Ashford line.

 

I will write a separate post for my Pullman projects, as this is a little more detailed and I have more to say. 

 

- Alex

Edited by AVS1998
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Even with a bracing piece behind the splasher, the two sides became unsoldered whenever I attempted to solder the splasher top to the side.... I managed one side but the other would not cooperate.

 

Alex

Try using a lower melting point solder to attach the tops. If you have a temperature controlled iron, you could even try using lowmelt solder as for white metal. It's advisable to tin the surfaces with ordinary solder first, but it sounds like you'll already have done that.

 

Jim

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Love what you are doing so far. Those Locos will be really good when they are done.

 

or possibly the Hornby/Triang Caledonian stock in its Caley livery (to me this looks quite close to the Brighton livery)....

 

....More 'local' services can be run with the older bogie stock and smaller coaches, possibly made up from Ratio Midland bogie coaches (I've read they are quite similar to the Brighton items once painted and slightly modified). The Bachmann Thomas 'red coaches' are fair representations of Brighton stock so a few of these could be acquired and repainted, also.

 

By the period your modelling Brighton Carriage stock would have been in all over Umber. Some may have still been in Umber and White but would be very worn if it was. As for the Bachmann Thomas and Ratio Midland carriages, these are both good to use for Brighton carriages IMHO. I use both on my layouts, they can be seen on my Oak Hill thread here:

 

Bachmann Thomas Carriages: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/107470-oak-hill-lbscr-secr-1905ish/page-6&do=findComment&comment=2323707

 

Ratio Midland Carriages: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/107470-oak-hill-lbscr-secr-1905ish/page-22&do=findComment&comment=2608149

 

Gary

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Alex,

Welcome to this friendly corner of RMWeb.  I try not to be interested in all things Southern but I seem to be fighting a losing battle.  It is an interesting list of projects and it takes a fair amount of understanding and a good eye to look at one model and see another. I will look forward to updates as and when they appear, but be warned it can take a while to make a post.

 

Remember, have fun with your modelling.

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Excellent stuff.  I do like seeing inventive loco conversions like yours, though I am not sure how you will raise the funds necessary to ship the C8 all the way back from Mordor.

 

Looking forward to developments.

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Coaches, part two:

 

Ex W&UT Coach

 

This four wheel former Great Eastern tram coach was bought by Colonel Stephens at the onset of the Grouping as the LNER were sorting their rolling stock and found they had a coach surplus to requirements. Brought down to the KESR, it received an olive and cream livery (the cream being in the above-window paneling) with wooden window frames. It was used at off-peak times on mixed trains, and also as a line inspection vehicle due to its narrow dimensions.

 

IMG_20170224_195408_zpsqpe4rz9f.jpg

 

Taking the body off this model for painting was relatively easy; the hard part was attempting to get the glazing out. I gave up in the end and instead just covered it over with bluetak and masking tape internally for when I was priming. Humbrol Olive Green provided the body colour and the orange of the original body became the wood surrounds on the windows. I'm tempted to install a worker on one of the verandas as it is perfectly logical there might have been one there even if it was stabled. Possibly it might receive some lining out, though not much- probably only a thin gold line around the paneling and under the windows.

 

LBSCR/Pullman 'PUP' Baggage Car

 

The LBSCR, when commissioning their Pullmans in the late nineteenth century, also ordered three six wheel 'PUP' baggage cars, clerestory, which carried luggage and pets between London and Brighton. In my wonderful slightly fictionalized setting of the run-up to Grouping, I imagine that one of the cars was repainted into 'old standard' Pullman livery (off-white up to the cantrail) and ran with Pullman services to Hastings and St Leonards, as well as standard SR services. 

 

IMG_20170224_200111_zps7vlft9xz.jpg

 

The chassis is made up of two hacked-up Hornby four wheel wagon chassis, with each wheelset being 2cm apart. It is still a little rough and ready for my liking and I'm tempted to change it in due course.

 

As for the body, this has its origins in a toy my siblings gave me from a town fair which I puzzled over as to what to do with it before deciding upon the 'PUP' idea.

 

The windows will need to be all filled in, or alternatively cut out and then the sides reworked. I'll fit a Pullman standard corridor connection, as part of a 'necessary rebuild'. The roof has also been cut down in length and height in an attempt to make it less 'Wild West'.

 

Screenshot_20170121-0031582_zpsz3bq3txn.

 

This is what the 'PUP's looked like in their original state; the body looks fairly easy to work with and whilst mine may not be completely to scale it will at least be a representation of.

 

SECR Pullman twelve wheel car, to be named

 

This car has its origins in a Roundhouse H0 US Pullman car kit, and Comet etched brass sides. I bought the car on eBay and then wasn't sure how to change the windows; they were initially very American in style and I wasn't too happy with this and so I decided to introduce brass sides. The brass sides arrived quickly, and comprised of two sides and the door fittings; I also ordered corridor ends. I chose the parlour first layout for the sides as I wanted to keep the coach as 'open' inside as possible. The plastic sides were cut away and then the brass ones affixed initially with Gorilla Glue but this didn't hold and so was changed to UHU glue which seems to be holding up thus far.

 

IMG_20170116_213459_zpsm1xzmpzv.jpg

 

IMG_20170116_212735_zpsslchof22.jpg

 

IMG_20170224_195953_zpsvi3wgl3x.jpg

 

IMG_20170224_200111_zps7vlft9xz.jpg

 

The bogies that came with the kit were rather undernourished and had very small diameter wheels- these were swapped out for Hornby six axle spares which look much better. Buffer beams were the Devon Belle observation car spares, and underframe detail was also from Comet and cast in white metal.

 

I'm not sure if I'll add underframes just yet, though I might at a later date. For now my task is mostly just sanding and filling, trying to get the brass sides as straight and neat as possible before priming. This car will be turned out in 'old standard' Pullman livery. As of yet I haven't thought of a suitable name, although I do like the sound of something set in the Hastings sort of area, or even something like ''The Conqueror''. It will be marshaled in amongst other Pullman cars, namely the Hornby contemporary offerings.

 

For my birthday in January I was bought a Railroad Pullman, which is rather nice as is although the livery is a little basic. I believe the prototype car type saw use in the south, so I might jazz this up eventually with Comet parts. It did strike me, however, that the Pullman Railroad Parlous looks rather similar to the SECR Pullmans, such as Topaz, were one to take out a few centimeters along the length... Topaz is 57' 6'', a scale 23cm over the buffers. The Railroad Pullman is 26cm. Whilst the 3cm are easy to lose, I'd be concerned about the oval window on the single oval side... I suppose it could be grafted in. No clue what bogies she rides on, either- I can't find any that look remotely similar. Still, a future project in the works, methinks. Not sure about the livery, either; I like both SECR lake and Pullman Old Standard, so I'm undecided as of yet. Maybe I'll make two, one in each livery. Who knows?

 

That's all I can think of to say for now, I'll probably chime in with something else soon.

 

- Alex

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Whoa, there is a lot going on here! A serious outbreak of creativity!

 

On Pullman Pups: one of their key functions was to carry the dynamos and batteries upon which the dazzling electric lighting of the train depended.

 

K

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Whoa, there is a lot going on here! A serious outbreak of creativity!

 

On Pullman Pups: one of their key functions was to carry the dynamos and batteries upon which the dazzling electric lighting of the train depended.

 

K

 

I didn't know that! I'll remember this. You learn something new every day.

 

- Alex

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Alex,

 

The C8 and K10 classes had 8' coupled wheelbases.  You might prefer an L11 in preference to the K10; basically a T9 on 5' 7" wheels - wide cab and not superheated.

 

Bill

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Alex,

 

The C8 and K10 classes had 8' coupled wheelbases. You might prefer an L11 in preference to the K10; basically a T9 on 5' 7" wheels - wide cab and not superheated.

 

Bill

from my research I'd found the K10 and C8 classes were 9' wheelbases as opposed to the 10' T9 class.

 

I looked at the L11 class but I don't want to run the risk of too many LSW locomotives around Hastings. The SECR D and E series is another I need to pursue, possibly in kit form.

 

thank you for the information, though, I'll check my sources again but I'm sure everywhere I looked stated a 9' wheelbase for the K10 and C8s.

 

- Alex

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A relevant extract from the words of 'The Engineer', 14th December 1888, describing the new train of 'Princess', 'Prince', and 'Albert Victor' are reproduced below.

 

The lighting system was developed by a combination of Stroudley, the LBSCR Electrician (the term used to describe Electrical Engineer at that date) Mr Houghton, and staff of the Faure accumulator company, and had been tested in the car that was (later, I think) called 'Beatrice'. The basics had been patented by Stroudley and Houghton as early as 1881.

post-26817-0-26330300-1487975598_thumb.png

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Wow. This is all excellent creative stuff. Railway modellinig, as oppsed to collecting. I will be following this thread with intererst

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WARNING- Not for the faint of heart, or for those who are staunchly Southern.

 

I'm sorry to say we have a couple of Northern interlopers in amongst my Southern stock lately- but for good reason!

 

I'm a member of the Hastings and St Leonards Model Railway Club and we've been invited to the Rye exhibition in April. ''Hurrah!'' we all cried, until we realised we actually had to work on the layout, on the rolling stock... And I was asked if I'd run a Flying Scotsman Pullman railtour. Well, okay...

 

But the problem is that, ever so lovely as the gift was from my Grandmother, I don't run Northern territory anymore and the Flying Scotsman seemed redundant to me. Furthermore, it was also of the wrong prototype (an A1 as apposed to an A3, as is preserved). This had to be fixed.

 

I've always found eBay to be a veritable source of spares and wrecks for salvage, and thus ordered an A3 body with the intent of having a straight swap for the current A1 body the model came with... Only to discover the body I ordered was for a tender drive. Damn.

 

IMG_20170302_012804_zpstbsaytxf.jpg

 

No matter, it still fits!

 

IMG_20170302_012910_zpsvntcadyi.jpg

 

The under boiler was cut out with a junior saw and filed down- it's still a little tight, but the body fits onto the chassis fairly well.

 

IMG_20170302_012823_zps7ee1a4rg.jpg

 

Goodness knows why, but the boiler top is removable and has horrid raised moulding everywhere. I don't mind so much as its only a layout locomotive, and it'll be repainted once finished into an 'alternative' green to our lovely Olive or Sage (not that I dislike Apple Green, it's just deciding between Doncaster and Darlington that frustrates me...)

 

This seems to have been a fairly simple conversion thus far, and so I'll hopefully have it finished by the beginning of April. Handrails, a paint job (with my first ever transfers!) and the German smoke deflectors are all that really needs doing.

 

BUT

 

The Flying Scotsman is not the only foreigner in our midst.

 

I'm also working on a fictitious 'new build' of an original GNR A1, which will be painted out in GNR livery! So it's not entirely incongruous to this pre-grouping thread. I recognise that the chassis should really be in maroon/red but I'd like to keep everything as simple as I can and so only the A1 body and the GNR tender body will be in (fairly) accurate GNR livery. Who knows, I might just do photographic grey.

 

IMG_20170302_013130_zpssbrd7avo.jpg

 

IMG_20170302_013138_zpssvxc1zs1.jpg

 

Again, all that is needed is handrails, coal rails and a paint job with transfers. I might- might- fit smoke deflectors, of a larger design, however it appears only one of the A1 class ever carried them with the GNR tender and never in GNR livery, and I don't want to have something really anachronistic running about (she says despite the numerous inaccuracies in her existing stock).

 

Anyway, I hope I haven't shocked you all too much. It's just another project really, to keep myself busy, and it's also a deadline to work to- something I've never had before in the hobby!

 

- Alex

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I like the commitment to "model" rather than buy. I too do pre grouping, but do have forays into later modern image like the LNER at times.

Great Northern frames should be a rich chocolate colour, precision does the paint colour. The buffer was also a rectangle in GNR liver with no cutouts on the corners for platforms. If you are feeling brave the cab was taller.

Flying scotsman would be in Doncaster Green.

I hope this helps, it is my intention, i find information on my thread most useful to assist my modelling.

The start you have made is very good and shows a strong streak of "enginuity" which is useful when having to kit bash.

Keep up the good work

Richard

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I like the commitment to "model" rather than buy. I too do pre grouping, but do have forays into later modern image like the LNER at times.

Great Northern frames should be a rich chocolate colour, precision does the paint colour. The buffer was also a rectangle in GNR liver with no cutouts on the corners for platforms. If you are feeling brave the cab was taller.

Flying scotsman would be in Doncaster Green.

I hope this helps, it is my intention, i find information on my thread most useful to assist my modelling.

The start you have made is very good and shows a strong streak of "enginuity" which is useful when having to kit bash.

Keep up the good work

Richard

 

 

Hello,

 

From the research I've found, the A1 buffer beams on the locomotives were cut-out in the late days of GNR rule/early LNER due to clearance issues at Newcastle station. I'm happy to have some compromises such as the cut-outs and the black underframes- if it means having to have the loco in LNER livery rather than the livery worn at the initial build, I'm happy to have that.

 

I had a feeling it was Donny green, seeing as the locomotive seemed more often than not to have been sighted at 'the plant' rather than slightly further north for repairs.

 

 

 

 

Coming back on topic for my southern coaches, upon closer inspection of the Hornby Margate offering, its dimensions are actually far more different than I'd first thought, at least when comparing it to the GraFar coaches I also have. The Margate coach is about a scale foot taller in body, and roughly two scale feet longer. The width of the coaches seems to be shared, however. I suppose this just means I can't really mix the two types of coach. No matter, I'm happy to have a rake of both and just be careful what I run each with.

 

It occurred to me that the GraFar coaches are a lot more similar to the restriction '1' stock than the '0', at least when looking at the stock on the KESR;  http://www.preservation.kesr.org.uk/coaching-stock/southern-railway

 

Nevertheless, I believe they still reached Hastings due to their wide route availability, albeit perhaps via Ashford or Brighton.

 

Still, I should eventually have some rakes made up- and once I've got my locomotives further ahead in the game (I've spied a Brighton Atlantic kit on eBay which I rather like the look of...) I'll hopefully be able to start testing out things at the club.

 

Alex

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 (I've spied a Brighton Atlantic kit on eBay which I rather like the look of...)

 

I've seen a few of these recently. Most of them have gone for more than the Bachmann model will cost!!

 

Gary

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It's frustrating that such a model should cost so much. I'd love an Atlantic, probably in umber though it might strain credulity that it would have run in that livery so long after grouping... But then I find it looks so much prettier in umber than olive!

 

If I had the money, I'd have probably a trio of Schools class, an N15 and a T9 (How I lament having sold both of those), a 'Remembrance' (in original condition), a few D and E classes, L/L1s, perhaps a mogul or two, an R1... The list is probably endless!

 

Kits do interest me and I'd like to cut my teeth properly on one but for the time being it looks like I'll just be tinkering and bodging. Not that I mind, of course.

 

I really ought to get on with my K10, give the Brassmasters cab another go... But that'll be completed eventually. If there's one thing I've learned its not to rush projects!

My one downfall is probably impatience with painting, though I'm getting better.

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I agree with you about the cost. I can't imagine it is easy being a student and a railway modeller!! And yes Umber is the only colour for a Brighton Atlantic! (says the man who has a BR Black one pre-ordered!!)

 

As for the L1 and R1 there is alway the Tri-ang / Hornby Dublo models which can be made to be very nice, as can be seen in bigbadbadge's thread here: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/117301-Hornby-dublo-r1-locomotive-and-triang-l1-detailed/

 

And if you ever feel like giving scratch building a go I can send you some 4mm drawings for the Remembrance Tanks. Just drop me a PM.

 

Gary

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