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Hello everyone,

 

I've been thinking about alternative ways to motorise my K10 and C8 projects, and I'm thinking that the Hornby 'Toy Story' locomotive might well be a good option.

 

It's effectively a 4-4-0 chassis with a clip-on bogie, but I can easily adapt this. I don't know what the wheel spacing is but as the chassis is hollow and plastic, I can also easily drill a new axle hole for the correct spacing, and fill the chassis as much as possible with lead shot. The loco body will also need shot where I can put it, although this is probably very limited.

 

I'm only really looking at this as a main alternative to the B12 chassis as it's usually cheaper and most 'spares or repair' are in fact just stripped gears on the driving wheel; the type four motor (box can) is perfectly fine. It's only a consideration at the end of the day and if it doesn't work then I can always use it for something else.

 

Opinions, please?

 

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Have a look on the SE Finecast website ( http://www.sefinecast.co.uk/Contents.htm ). There is a good selection of Southern locos on there, and the advantage is that Dave will supply you any part you want from any of his kits (that now includes the old Nu-cast ones as well). I see he has an M7 tank, so that's one soruce sorted...

 

Beware that you may well end up wanting some kits though!

 

Looking forward to looking at this thread tomorrow, when I'm not it work and the pictures will actually show!

 

Andy G

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I've looked at the catalogue a fair few times and I always leave wishing I was the sort of woman who'd just buried her third husband... Having disposable income would be nice haha.

 

Kits are something I want to eventually turn to (there's a GNR C1 body kit on eBay at the moment that I'm thinking about bidding on so I can adapt it into a Brighton H1 (possibly a H2 if I straighten out the running plate over the pistons), following Matt (Bluebell Model Railway)'s build here: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/25664-bmr-workbench/page-3 ) though for now I'd like to hone my skills on my bashes.

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Glad I'm not the only one that drools over Daves kits... (and there only really the old body kit for the Crab that would be any use to me!)

 

Kitbashes are even more fun than RTR bashes, especially when your after something that's almost like something else. I really like w/metal kits for the easy you can butcher them, and the weight that they have, which aids traction and pick-up (always add as much lead as you can!). I will admit that I don't solder them, I superglue them... (hangs head in shame)

 

Andy G

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Kitbashes are even more fun than RTR bashes.... I really like w/metal kits for the easy you can butcher them, and the weight that they have, which aids traction and pick-up (always add as much lead as you can!). I will admit that I don't solder them, I superglue them... (hangs head in shame)

 

Yeah, I've always been a basher. My only bugbear is bloody plastic not wanting to weld together! Soldering isn't much better either. I'm getting better at it though, I've got two soldering irons and now I reserve one for higher melt solder and the other for my leaded, low-melt. Doesn't mean to say I'm any good at it, but it's all about practice practice practice.

 

It's like me and my painting. I'm taking more time with it when I do paint, and I'm getting better results each time. I'm dreading painting my clerestory Pullman, although as I'm doing 'old standard' it shouldn't be too difficult, just lots of lining (though I've got a bow-pen floating around somewhere which I'll use. It's actually rather easy to use, provided you have a flat surface to rule with).

 

Soldering white metal I do find daunting but I've heard of people do it with regular low-melt solder and hence I might do the same. But, if gluing works for you, carry on with it! Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. At least you're building, at the end of the day.

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My knowledge of all things Southern is that they are, well , in the south but I'm intrigued by your use of the old Grafar corridor coaches as I recall an SR layout in the Railway Modeller back in 1977 in which the author stated that he wouldn't bother building any more PC kits for LSWR stock as the then new Grafar coaches were just as good !

Edited by CKPR
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I found the body of one of those Grafars in the bits box in my locker in work the other week. Its one of those painted up as an LMS vehicle, which it is blatantly not. I've got no use for it, so if you want it, I can shove it in the post to you.

 

The work your doing is very impressive, but I'm a tad confused by the Pup photos... Is the second, fully lined vehicle yours?

 

Somewhere I happen to have a lot of drawings of 'Southern' (I say it that way as I can't remember which company that became Southern the drawings are for) Pullmans, and other stuff too.

 

Andy G

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I found the body of one of those Grafars in the bits box in my locker in work the other week. Its one of those painted up as an LMS vehicle, which it is blatantly not. I've got no use for it, so if you want it, I can shove it in the post to you.

 

The work your doing is very impressive, but I'm a tad confused by the Pup photos... Is the second, fully lined vehicle yours?

 

Somewhere I happen to have a lot of drawings of 'Southern' (I say it that way as I can't remember which company that became Southern the drawings are for) Pullmans, and other stuff too.

 

Andy G

 

Hi Andy,

 

I wish I could say the second fully painted picture was mine, but sadly it isn't. It's a photo I found online- if I can I'll find the source of the model (I know there is a very small company produces them) edit:  http://www.marcmodels.co.uk/SR%20LB&SCR%20Pullmans.html This is the producer of the coaches; very nice, but very pricey!

 

On that note, however, I did find some printouts I did a while ago of the Brighton Pullmans right from the early days through to the early 1900s, and they are 4mm scale from the Railway Constructor, so I might follow those instead, but we'll see. If you PM me regarding those drawings I'd be interested to find out what you have, certainly- although I am trying to be careful not to be overrun with Pullmans!

 

The offer of the GraFar coach is much appreciated- I know I could use all the stock I can get- but it's entirely up to you what you do with it. I'd certainly enjoy having another coach to work on. Again, PM me and we might be able to arrange something.

 

Alex

Edited by AVS1998
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Hello everyone,

 

I've done a rough and ready table on Word using the information from this website (http://www.britishrailways.info/pullman_cars.htm) to act as a guide to names and numbers of Pullman cars that are ex SECR and LBSC, including the car type, the dimensions where I can give them, restrictions and livery. I'll try and continue this work and if anyone should like a copy I'll send it over.

 

The lengths are full-scale and in 1/76 conversions as well, for modelling purposes. The bogie type is also included so as to aid selection of bogies if one were to pursue a scratch-build of these cars. I'd recommend the Keen or Hornby Pullman Standard four wheel bogie, and the same company (Hornby) for their six wheel Pullman bogie which, according to drawings I have in the book, ''Pullman Profile no 1: The Twelve Wheel Cars'', appear to be as close as is possible.

 

Furthermore, I've also separated the cars out into groups by dates (roughly 5-7 year build batches) to aid you further. When it comes to the earlier Brighton Pullmans (1880-1910) I do have PDF files of the 1980s 'Model Constructor' series as well, if these are of any use.

 

I hope someone finds this helpful- it has taken me an awfully long time.

 

- Alex

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Hello everyone,

 

Work on the C8 and K10 continues. I've braced the K10 running board as the plastic was thin and the two halves refused to marry up with glue, and so hopefully they'll manage to hold up and I'll have another body nearly completed.

 

The C8 was test fitted with a pair of Hornby 0-4-0 coupling rods which, as I'd suspected, are the correct spacing and so another pair will be ordered at some point soon.

 

IMG_20170317_022219_zpseawegexe.jpg

 

I've also ordered two Hornby 'Toy Story' locos that have shredded gears on the drive wheels; with any luck I'll be able to assess whether they're worth salvaging and if they're bashable once they arrive.

 

Here's to hoping I can get some more work done when I'm next paid again (Not my loan. Oh no. Student Finance deign only to furnish me with enough to pay my rent. Means-tested my ****)

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Hello everybody,

I've been having a little think about the 'proposed' KESR extension from Tenterden to Hastings, as an alternative route to that from Roberstbridge, and I remembered that both the KESR and the East Kent Railway had at one time an Adams Radial tank, and so I began to ponder about livery applications. While I usually would prefer a green over other colours (I fly my Southern alliance flag proudly) I do quite like the KESR navy blue, as seen here:

 hornby-kesr-a1x-terrier-3-bodiam.jpg (Credit to https://locoyard.com/2013/04/23/Hornby-lbscr-southern-terrier-a1a1x-class-review/ )

 

It's a nice enough livery and certainly looks good with Pullmans, pre-grouping livery coaches and perhaps even SR Olive (I'd have the KESR charter coaches from the SR for certain services). I think if I were to use the Rust-Oleum 'navy blue' spray paint with a matte satin varnish over the top, this would look fairly representative of the livery.

The livery colour (according to my conversion of the RGB value from Paint) is #273848 Hex, and the Rust-Oleum looks close enough.

 

It'll be a chance to use my bow-pen (when it turns up), most likely lining with 'bufferbeam red' from Humbrol.

 

I know I might be jumping the gun, thinking ahead with projects but I will aim to get my current projects completed before I embark on anything new.

 

On that note, I've also been thinking about the viability of the 'Tony Wright goalpost' coupling I've employed on my coaching stock. I feel it will be suitable for fixed rakes, which I intend on running, but on the ends of rakes I might revert to NEM standard couplings for ease of changing haulage, and I'll probably use Kadee couplings or similar. I realise this may be expensive but I'd prefer it for ease of operation.


That's all for now,

Alex

Edited by AVS1998
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I have to say that I personally hate Kadee's, they are fine on buckeyed stock (like the grisly Gresleys, and BR southern region EMU's), but I find them more abhorrent on other stock than the old triang couplings!

 

For inter-carriage rakes you could adapt Tonys coupling to include representations of the vacuum and steam heating pipes...

 

I'm tempted with the Sayer-Chaplin coupling, which looks to have possibilities.

 

Andy G

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I have to say that I personally hate Kadee's, they are fine on buckeyed stock (like the grisly Gresleys, and BR southern region EMU's), but I find them more abhorrent on other stock than the old triang couplings!

 

For inter-carriage rakes you could adapt Tonys coupling to include representations of the vacuum and steam heating pipes...

 

I'm tempted with the Sayer-Chaplin coupling, which looks to have possibilities.

 

Andy G

 

 

I agree they are rather incongruous with a lot of stock I'd be running, but for end rakes and loco couplings I suppose they're relatively easy to work with, especially for remote uncoupling. 

 

I'll look into the SC coupling, it sounds like it may well have potential. As for inter-rake couplings, I'm happy with the Wright coupling I've employed, though as you've suggested I may add the coach heating and brake pipes at a later date.

 

Whatever works, I suppose

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Hello everyone,

 

I received the 'Toy Story' chassis today, and here's just a quick overlook of how they fit with the C8/K10 bodies:

 

The Toy Story body, as is, is screwed onto the chassis at the front... But apparently the screws aren't very effective as I was able to pull the bodies off straight away. It looks like the spacing is identical to the 0-4-0 chassis, which is perfect as it works out as a scale 9'.

 

IMG_20170324_140708_zpsbawxluda.jpg

 

I may well save the piston fitting as it has space to suspend a bogie from it (the one supplied is a clip-in, but I think the T9 bogie may fit). Also to be saved are the cow catchers from both chassis; I'm planning on setting the layout in winter and might have a go at adapting them into snow-ploughs. The bodies are of no consequence, although I may sell them on. 

 

IMG_20170324_140735_zpsaydynw6i.jpg

 

The chassis is made from thin cast metal and has the motor (the square type, a type seven I believe) set between the frames and with a metal worm gear, making swapping the wheelset out an easier task and reducing the chance of wear. It's also quite a weighty chassis, with all the weight over the four drivers and it's well balanced. Wires are all long enough to sit in the body, which is also ideal for fitting with DCC chips.

 

IMG_20170324_140825_zps2xemnwti.jpg

 

The front extension on the chassis is quite thick and a little unecessary for my purposes, but I'll consider trying to thin it out before cutting it out altogether. At the back under the cab, around 5mm needs trimming off to make it fit into the body snugly, but I can saw this off at some point.

 

Overall, I think I've done rather well with my chassis choice- a gamble which paid off.

 

- Alex

Edited by AVS1998
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Hello everyone

 

As you may have seen on my profile, I've been considering casting in resin some Pullman cars which are unavailable. Some people have come back to me and said ''but Keen already produce resin bodies, what would you want to make your own for?''. Well, I propose casting some of the older types of Pullman car that are more suited to my future layout, such as the Brighton clerestories (including the PUPs), the Hastings kitchen car Pullmans and perhaps some of the SECR 'American'/Pullman cars, also.

 

This post will be outlining a possible path to the Hastings Pullmans, and how I'd go about creating the body.

 

As is, a Hornby Kitchen Parlour car (in this instance, Argus), is 25.5cm over the buffers, and around 3.5cm wide. The Hastings cars were 57 1 1/2 inches long,and thus around an inch has to be removed from the model's length.

 

IMG_20170321_012731_zpsvw4ghvjc.jpg

 

There is one window too many on this side, however the spacing of the windows is correct and there is also the kitchen window.

 

IMG_20170321_012817_zpsvwnietnx.jpg

 

With a window removed and some of the bodywork also trimmed down in length, the model would now sit at 23cm, the correct length.

 

I did also trial this with a print-out of the Railroad Pullman Parlour but it did not look nearly as accurate, especially given the Hastings cars were matchboard sided, and thus using a main range Pullman would avoid this problem. In terms of width, the car would have to lose around 7 scale inches, or 0.23cm. Whether this seems worth it or not, I'm not yet sure. I'd like a noticeable difference, certainly. What I'd probably do would be to remove the gangway connectors, and any roof detail I could then cut the model straight down the middle with a circular saw and then fix it back together, probably with bracing inside.

 

This project, if I do undertake it, will require more research into casting in resin and how to go about it. I did find this video -

- extremely useful for explaining the process and how to go about it, especially as my casting will be hollow.

 

If it does work, I'll be salvaging the chassis from the model and perhaps casting from that too, or constructing a new chassis from metal and recycling the underframe detail and bogies as far as possible.

 

If anyone has any advice or pointers, or even an opinion on this potential project (which will be a way off yet) please PM me.

 

- Alex

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I like the idea and the side looks good. I would not worry with the 2mm on the width, it would be harder to hide the cut and people look from the side on model railways.

Have people noticed the stove R is 2mm too wide?

No one noticed a gresley bogie was 8ft6 and it should have been 8ft on our exhibition layout. 2mm is hard to spot on a dimension as great as that.

Richard

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I like the idea and the side looks good. I would not worry with the 2mm on the width, it would be harder to hide the cut and people look from the side on model railways.

Have people noticed the stove R is 2mm too wide?

No one noticed a gresley bogie was 8ft6 and it should have been 8ft on our exhibition layout. 2mm is hard to spot on a dimension as great as that.

Richard

 

That's a very fair point- I suppose if it was more of a slab-sided coach, such as a Maunsell or a MK1 then it would be far more apparent and judicious to make the cut. But as you say, when viewed from the side it isn't so much of an issue.

 

I'll try and buy a matchboard KP car (most likely eBay or Hatton's) and assess it in the flesh. It may be a case of borrowing a disc cutter from my Granddad when I'm next up in York and doing it there, and making the cut at odd places to make the length and layout fit.

 

-

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Hello everyone,

 

I've been doing a bit more research into the K10 and C8 classes, and annoyingly it seems I did get some of my research wrong when it came to the K10's wheelbase...

 

I'd thought it was 8' but according to a scale diagram, apparently not. It's 9'. From my research the C8 is still an 8' wheelbase so I shall still continue the build on this, but it just means I now have two tenders with which to run it.

 

Drummonds204-4-0s201_zpsozgstog7.jpg

 

(Original credit to W. Osborne for the sketch in Model Railway Constructor).

 

However, this does mean I now have a spare chassis and half-constructed body... What to do with it...

 

Well, if I manage to fix up or if I replace the running board, and add some splashers, a cab... I can create...

 

 

LBSCR%20Gladstone%201_zps3tokxekj.jpg

 

The spacing of the wheels is 2mm shorter than that on the 'Toy Story' chassis but for the sake of an unnoticeable 2mm, I don't think I'll be too concerned. Yes, I know it's half a foot technically but while I enjoy accuracy I don't want to spend forever trying to find yet another chassis with suitable spacing.

 

Following BlueLightening's thread on their LBSC layout, and their 'Gladstone' build, I think I shall follow a similar pattern... I'll try and find an old M7 body for the splashers and smokebox, however for the tender I am awfully tempted to look into a Caledonian Single body, as it looks to be more or less the correct outline, including the toolbox at the rear. All I'll need to do is fit an inside-bearing chassis for the wheels. I doubt I'll have to lower the height or shorten it (too much). The cab will be constructed in plasticard, as will the roof. Chimney will be sourced from Alan Gibson, most likely.

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/107470-oak-hill-lbscr-secr-1905ish/

 

I'll finish the locomotive in either Marsh Umber with a white roof and gold lining or in red lined black with a black roof. I suppose it depends what takes my fancy. In spite of number 182 'Hastings' having been scrapped in 1910, I think I'd quite like to have the name for the loco given it's the setting of the eventual layout.

 

In other news, I'm back in Leeds for a week visiting my parents and I've found a few little things I'd forgotten about which I'm taking back down to Hastings with me. Namely a trio of Hornby MK1s, the brake of which I'll roster into my Pullman excursion train for Rye Model Railway Expo on the 21st. I may well sell them afterwards- they're only basic but I've no need for them really.

 

That's all for now,

 

Alex

     

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The C8 has a 9' wheelbase, so that Hornby chassis should do the job. 

 

I got this far with mine, but have yet to tackle the chassis: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/93004-modifying-the-gbl-t9-in-to-a-lswr-c8/ 

 

The first attempt distorted, so the second go was left on the shelf for a 'month or two' to make sure this didn't happened again. That was nearly 2 years ago...... 

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The C8 has a 9' wheelbase, so that Hornby chassis should do the job. 

 

I got this far with mine, but have yet to tackle the chassis: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/93004-modifying-the-gbl-t9-in-to-a-lswr-c8/ 

 

The first attempt distorted, so the second go was left on the shelf for a 'month or two' to make sure this didn't happened again. That was nearly 2 years ago...... 

 

Hi Pete,

 

Funnily enough it was looking at that post when I first came across it and knowing that a fair few LSW 4-4-0s were trialed on the central and eastern divisions that led me to attempt the C8 and K10. I think I've gotten myself very confused with the wheel spacing now!

 

From initial research, the C8s and K10s shared the same wheelbase, frames and boiler but the K10 had smaller drivers... I think I've probably gotten confused with the class name and the wheelbase- a simple mistake but embarrassing nonetheless. Still, I think I might just stick it out with the K10 (simply remove the wingplate from the smokebox of the C8) and finish it as a narrow cab locomotive. It may not be fully prototypical but at this point, I just want to finish the project.

 

As already mentioned, I'll keep the two tenders for use with the locomotive (the six wheel tender will make more sense as the eastern section had shorter turntables).

 

Deary me, research certainly pays off doesn't it!

 

With that spare body, I'll still attempt the B1 Class, I'll just have to adapt it a bit further. One day I will finish a project..

 

Alex

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Evening everyone,

 

I spent some time today scaling out a couple of maps of Hastings station. One was taken from Google maps, and is the station as is today. I know that the stations don't match up in terms of track layout or platforms, but the length from Hastings (sometimes known as Summerfield) Tunnel and South Terrace road bridge, and an older map, a plan of Hastings station and yards circa 1923. I'd assume that the station hadn't changed much, if at all, during the lapse from 1920-23 and thus would work from this plan/map...

 

.. If scaling didn't make it so damn awkward!

 

The map from Google showed me that the distance between the two points worked out at 2500 feet, or 10 metres in 4mm scale. Ah.

 

And the depth taken from the old plan indicated that, from the cliff behind the station to the foremost yards (including those which were on the site currently occupied by Sussex Coast College) worked out at a scale 7.5 feet approximately. Clearly, I've got some trimming to do.

 

I feel like I can lose 2-4 feet from the depth, and still retain a fair representation of the sidings. The turntable (or turntables- some accounts I've read suggest that there were two of different sizes) and buildings I can also suitably reduce to fit the dimensions I'll eventually work with. In terms of length, I'd prefer not to have to run to 10m, especially as I'd also like to have a fiddle yard behind (working in a 'roundy-roundy' fashion) and be able to run reasonable length trains- say, five Maunsells or Pullmans and a locomotive. This would require the station platforms to be around 2m long- this does include space either side of the train itself.

 

 

Looking at the bridge over Linton Road, at the tunnel end (West) of the station, it bears some similarity, to me at least, of the Hornby 'triple arch viaduct' piece available. Yes, I'd have to remove the girders from the top of the moulding, some judicious repainting and weathering would be needed, not to mention the balustrade at the top of the bridge and extension of the pillars but I feel like it might work.

 

linton%20road_zpszoos5tv7.jpg

 

(taken from http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1298306 with credit to N Chadwick)

 

three%20arch_zpseqjw4ifx.jpg

 

(taken from http://www.hattons.co.uk/105633/Hornby_R180_U_01_Three_arch_viaduct_Pre_owned_poor_box/StockDetail.aspx)

 

 

Additionally, from a little digging, I've found out a few details regarding the station:

 

- the signalling and the 'boxes were almost certainly SER fare, though I'm curious as to whether Brighton crews had to learn this system solely for St Leonards and Hastings workings.

 

- there were three signal boxes at Hastings until 1930- West, East and Goods Yard. Presumably these were for controlling the line up til Bo-Peep (possibly Eastbourne) and Rye, respectively.

 

- the station building was possibly in Italianate style, similar to that seen at Rye.

 

- I had looked into the SECR steam railmotors for workings between Ashford-Rye- Hastings and Eastbourne-Hastings for market days and the like. However, they were all withdrawn in 1920, converted to two coach sets in '24 and set to work with the P class.

 

- late SECR livery was dark grey with large white numerals and text, which makes livery application a fair bit easier

 

 

 

So, with that in mind, I'm just waiting now on some feedback from inquiries. I'm in Leeds at the moment visiting my parents and I'd like to get over to York before I go to Manchester to see my partner on Wednesday, though I'm leaving it somewhat late. If I can, though, I'll go and see if I can't get some detail on the station.

 

Slightly off-topic, but it does still relate to the railmotors- I read somewhere that some ex SECR Push-Pull units were converted to articulated units and put to use in the South-West. Shame they didn't stay more local, I do love a good bit of articulation. Maybe I ought to develop one, just for the giggles.

 

Or not. Finish what's on your plate before looking ahead to the sweet course...

 

- Alex

 

EDIT:

 

I forgot to mention, the MK1 brake that I've found at home- I'm toying with the idea of repainting it into a very basic representation of Pullman livery, to run with the Rye expo Pullman rail tour rake. Or I may keep it maroon and apply some Letraset transfers to say 'NRM York'.

Edited by AVS1998
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Alex,

 

That's a lot of compressing to do!! But I'm sure it will work quite well, my Hailsham layout is compressed to roughly half the scale size, possibly a bit smaller!

 

With regard to the signalling yes it would have all been SE&CR however I don't think the LB&SCR system was much different.

 

The coast line becomes ex-LB&SCR from Bo-Peep junction and I believe until the Southern re-signalled the system in the 1930's every was still operated much as it had been before that no there wouldn't have been a link along that route between them (I could be wrong, hopefully someone will be along to correct me if I am).

 

I have a friend at club that models the SE&CR who may have some information regarding the station building. I can enquire on Monday if you would like.

 

Oh and you should make an articulated set. who needs to finish a project?? :jester: :jester:

 

Gary

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With regard to the signalling yes it would have all been SE&CR however I don't think the LB&SCR system was much different. [...]

 

I have a friend at club that models the SE&CR who may have some information regarding the station building. I can enquire on Monday if you would like.

 

Oh and you should make an articulated set. who needs to finish a project?? :jester: :jester:

 

Gary

 

Hey Gary,

 

That sounds grand! Any help or information I can get is always appreciated.

 

And as for the artics, well, we'll see :senile:

 

I may well look into them in the future.

 

- Alex

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Evening all,

 

I've done a bit of reading as regards Brighton coach liveries (online- sadly I didn't have time over my stay at my parent's to get to the NRM), and I was very interested to read a few little bits on this website;  http://www.lbscr.org/livery/index.html

 

Brighton coaching stock livery is explained as follows:

 

''On 18th February 1903, four carriages were inspected by the Directors at London Bridge. The colour schemes were:

    Olive green
    Olive green & white
    Umber and white
    Pale and middle green

 

At the board meeting the following week the decision was made to change the liveries to Umber and White.''

 

However, this befits stock running between 1903-11. As I've made quite clear, I'm operating 1920-30. However, I can't help but wonder if maybe one or two of the coaches were kept in storage during the war and came out post 1918-19 in their trial liveries... I do normally dislike anachronisms, but sometimes it's fun to go off the beaten track with history and to play pretend. After all, we are playing with miniature trains at the end of the day.

 

Locomotive livery is a bit more bland, two-tone umber with gold or yellow lettering and lining, white roofs for passenger stock, black for goods. I might well have a few black LBSC locomotives, purely because I find them quite smart (and it was a livery that survived, in theory, until it was discontinued in '21 but it would have remained for a good while after that).

 

On the B1 planning, I'm tempted to order a GBL 123 'Caledonian Single' to scale it against my drawing of 'Gladstone' and see if I can't use the running plate, boiler and smokebox, its cab (with a new roof) and tender (sans frames). I think I could make it work, especially if I followed BlueLightening's line and used an M7's splashers for those on the B1. It could all work out rather well. Hopefully it wouldn't look *too* Scottish (or Southwestern- that wouldn't do at all).

 

I've noticed whenever people model the Southern region, they always model the Southwest- is there a reason for that? Is it the standardisation, the fact that there seems to be far more stock available for this section or is it because you can invent a small, slow little town in the open Western areas far easier than the busy Southeast?

 

I don't know... Just a thought. Saying that, there's a feature I noticed in this month's 'Railway Modeller' on a layout set in Kent (which I'm always glad to see). The last one I remember was in 'Hornby Magazine' about four years ago set at Manston Airport.

 

That's all for now,

 

Alex

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