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I've bought a GBL C class, I'm trying to decide if I'd rather motorise it with an RTR chassis (the Hornby 4f seems okay, or the Bachmann 3f) or if I'd prefer to attempt a chassis kit. Allegedly the SECR R1 and C shared their wheelbases so in theory I could use SE Finecast's R1 chassis, which is £32 without wheels or motor. Hmm. I'd probably go cheaper as it's easier to replace. If the tender is any good and matches SECR standard tenders (such as those used on the D, E etc) I may well try and cast it in resin for future models. From what I've seen on the GBL C class, the paintwork is rather good, it's just the lining which lets it down however given the era I am modelling, it would require a repaint anyway, into simplified Wainwright, austerity grey or plain black with Maunsell lettering... Not sure which I'd prefer, as of yet. Maybe grey. It's easy to do.

 

Watch out for the Finecast R1 chassis. It's one of the generic ones designed to go under their older body kits instead of a Hornby-Dublo chassis, so the wheelbase is wrong for the R1 (and by more than a few millimeters). I ended up replacing the one that came with my R1 with the Branchlines chassis from their O1, which they sell separately. 

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You may find a rtr chassis cheaper once you factor in wheels etc. for the tender Alan Gibson does a whole range of frames for the wheelbase to be placed inside tender of your choice, increasing by 6 scale inches at a time. One must surely be close.

Richard

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Watch out for the Finecast R1 chassis. It's one of the generic ones designed to go under their older body kits instead of a Hornby-Dublo chassis, so the wheelbase is wrong for the R1 (and by more than a few millimeters). I ended up replacing the one that came with my R1 with the Branchlines chassis from their O1, which they sell separately. 

 

 

You may find a rtr chassis cheaper once you factor in wheels etc. for the tender Alan Gibson does a whole range of frames for the wheelbase to be placed inside tender of your choice, increasing by 6 scale inches at a time. One must surely be close.

Richard

 

Looking at the GBL thread, it seems that the Bachmann Pannier tank or their 3f chassis are most suited to the task, and also have the benefit of running well. I'll keep my eyes open for second hand or damaged body examples. As for the tender, I've had a quick look at Alan Gibson's range (to be honest, I hadn't thought about the possibility he might offer tender frames) and I've come up trumps with a fine example and the correct size and spoke wheels, too, which is most surprising.

 

I'll place an order as soon as I can, then that will hopefully be the B1 tender nearing completion.

 

- Alex

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Hello everyone,

 

the C class arrived today and my first impressions of it were very much surprised. Asides a messy paint-job, I'm really really impressed. Minimal moulding lines, no loose parts, and it was so easy to remove from the plinth!

 

Here it is resting on the plinth (along with a delightful shot of my legs)- I really do like this emerald livery. Shame it has to go.

 

IMG_20170623_142407_zpsrtvtncsw.jpg

 

As I'd said I would, I've looked at the tender and compared it with the SECR standard tender diagram in my copy of 'Historic Locomotive Drawings' by FJ. Roche, and the tender is indeed the same dimensions (although I believe the C class tender had a slightly smaller coal and water capacity due to its internal layout). This makes an attempt in resin all the more tempting.

 

310e8fbe-601c-4a95-a12b-7bb3ff32cd15_zps

 

All detail from both units have been removed, any mould linings sanded down (and the additional erroneous divider in the tender cut away) and stored for safety. I still need to buy a new pin vice drill.. thing and some new bits, the last one I had was hopeless. A Dremmel would also be useful- I'll have a look in the local hardware store in a little bit. I need some glue as it is, so I may as well. Then I'll get on with handrails and piping before painting the body. Just got to source a chassis and some wheels now. Still undecided as to whether I'd rather leave it in wartime grey or Southern lined green Both can look lovely, although the laziness in me is leaning towards grey, I think the prototype fanatic in me would prefer green. I've yet to decide a number, too, which doesn't exactly help matters. 

 

- Alex

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UPDATE:

 

I've had a quick peruse of eBay and the general t'interwebs, it turns out the LSWR standard six wheel tender also shared a 6' 6' wheelbase, so the keeper plate from the new 700 class tender has been ordered (around £1.90 plus postage) and it also looks like the screw holes will meet up near enough perfectly with those on the C class chassis. If not then it doesn't matter too much, I'll glue it all together but how ideal is that!

 

Not sure if I'll keep the brake rigging parts on though, I may cut them off the keeper plate as they have a tendency to fall off anyway and I may as well just drill holes in the brake shoes of the C class chassis and insert rodding to represent brake gear.

 

- Alex

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Hello everyone,

 

the C class arrived today and my first impressions of it were very much surprised. Asides a messy paint-job, I'm really really impressed. Minimal moulding lines, no loose parts, and it was so easy to remove from the plinth!

 

Here it is resting on the plinth (along with a delightful shot of my legs)- I really do like this emerald livery. Shame it has to go.

 

IMG_20170623_142407_zpsrtvtncsw.jpg

 

As I'd said I would, I've looked at the tender and compared it with the SECR standard tender diagram in my copy of 'Historic Locomotive Drawings' by FJ. Roche, and the tender is indeed the same dimensions (although I believe the C class tender had a slightly smaller coal and water capacity due to its internal layout). This makes an attempt in resin all the more tempting.

 

310e8fbe-601c-4a95-a12b-7bb3ff32cd15_zps

 

All detail from both units have been removed, any mould linings sanded down (and the additional erroneous divider in the tender cut away) and stored for safety. I still need to buy a new pin vice drill.. thing and some new bits, the last one I had was hopeless. A Dremmel would also be useful- I'll have a look in the local hardware store in a little bit. I need some glue as it is, so I may as well. Then I'll get on with handrails and piping before painting the body. Just got to source a chassis and some wheels now. Still undecided as to whether I'd rather leave it in wartime grey or Southern lined green Both can look lovely, although the laziness in me is leaning towards grey, I think the prototype fanatic in me would prefer green. I've yet to decide a number, too, which doesn't exactly help matters. 

 

- Alex

 

A resin cast of this would be great

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Alex,

 

I have to agree with Edwardian that a resin cast of this would be a good idea, I would certainly be willing to buy a few if you did this!! In fact I kind of wish I knew how to resin cast myself!!

 

It may be a bit late now but my GBL C Class sits on an Airfix 4f tender drive chassis and the wheels line up great for both the loco and tender!

 

Gary

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A resin cast of this would be great

 

 

Alex,

 

I have to agree with Edwardian that a resin cast of this would be a good idea, I would certainly be willing to buy a few if you did this!! In fact I kind of wish I knew how to resin cast myself!!

 

It may be a bit late now but my GBL C Class sits on an Airfix 4f tender drive chassis and the wheels line up great for both the loco and tender!

 

Gary

 

Hello both of you!

 

I'll look into resin casting and I'll get to work as soon as I can (funds permitting, of course!) I've looked at the Airfix 4F and although I wouldn't normally object to a tender drive unit, it just seems quite clunky and they're expensive for what you get.

 

I was just working on a Hastings line Pullman car, one of the first class parlours... Hacking about a coach body to shorten the length in different areas isn't as easy as you'd think. Still, it wasn't expensive and I got it a while ago so it isn't too much of a loss. It was a 'abuse as you must' sort of item, I suppose. Just means I've got to buy some more Pullmans now, and possibly look into 3D printing a Hastings line car instead (probably far easier, to be fair.)

 

Ah well.

 

- Alex

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Hello both of you!

 

Hacking about a coach body to shorten the length in different areas isn't as easy as you'd think.

 

As I have found.  Purchase of a whole suite of abrasive equipment followed by many days of filling and sanding!

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Rather than 3D printing, pullman cars (with their flat sides) are an ideal introduction to doing something with a Silhouette cutter. You don't need the cutter to draw the sides (and their are enough of us with cutters who will do cut it out for you), you just need the drawing, and a computer program to do the drawing. Most use Inkscape, but I don't get on with it, so I use silhouette studio (which you can download for free from the silhouette site).

 

Give it a go, its worth the effort and you will end up using it for all sorts of things.....

 

Andy G

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As I have found.  Purchase of a whole suite of abrasive equipment followed by many days of filling and sanding!

 

What he said. That and lots of practise!!!!!

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I've got an array of sandpaper, emery boards and the like, and I've got some Polyfilla, but it's more the ruin of the body that I'm concerned about.

 

The trouble was that I had to cut the body at different points along its length, and then also cut the roof to come back over- a sort of vertical and longitudinal cut-and-shut, if you will.

 

07c78f5f-9614-4c00-bdd5-5577e12b428a_zps

 

This has resulted in the body being in about three big pieces, and then the vestibule at one end snapped off due to my not leaving enough material, and the chassis is in a bit of a state. Still, it's an education at the end of the day. I might attempt to resurrect it, but for now I'll try and focus on my locomotives.

 

- Alex

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I've looked at the Airfix 4F and although I wouldn't normally object to a tender drive unit, it just seems quite clunky and they're expensive for what you get.

 

 

I too also have a tendency to avoid tender drive mechanisms, if your looking to motorise the C Class I found that a Jinty chassis works just fine, nearly a straight drop in fit.

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/75169-nelsons-workbench-rolling-stock-from-ulster/?p=1785392

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I too also have a tendency to avoid tender drive mechanisms, if your looking to motorise the C Class I found that a Jinty chassis works just fine, nearly a straight drop in fit.

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/75169-nelsons-workbench-rolling-stock-from-ulster/?p=1785392

Hello there!

 

I've looked at your thread a few times, and I've always been so envious of your use of plasticard- anything I attempt in that medium just becomes a soggy, stringy sad mess.

 

The 3f chassis I've heard good things about, is it the Hornby or the Bachmann? It looks like the latter. The Hornby one is an okay runner, from previous experience, but is a pain to fit into the boiler of the C class. Just got to keep my eyes peeled for a damaged Bachmann example I suppose!

 

Keep on making me jealous, it's motivation to get my modelling standards up!

 

- Alex

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Try using Lemonene as the solvent, its much more gentle, and you don't get a stringy mess.....

 

Andy G

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Evening everyone,

 

I spent some time today scaling out a couple of maps of Hastings station. One was taken from Google maps, and is the station as is today. I know that the stations don't match up in terms of track layout or platforms, but the length from Hastings (sometimes known as Summerfield) Tunnel and South Terrace road bridge, and an older map, a plan of Hastings station and yards circa 1923. I'd assume that the station hadn't changed much, if at all, during the lapse from 1920-23 and thus would work from this plan/map...

 

.. If scaling didn't make it so damn awkward!

 

The map from Google showed me that the distance between the two points worked out at 2500 feet, or 10 metres in 4mm scale. Ah.

 

And the depth taken from the old plan indicated that, from the cliff behind the station to the foremost yards (including those which were on the site currently occupied by Sussex Coast College) worked out at a scale 7.5 feet approximately. Clearly, I've got some trimming to do.

 

In case it is of any interest I have just uploaded a map, in six over-lapping sections of Hastings in circa 1884, into my gallery at http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/gallery/album/4270-map-of-hastings/ I have a fair number of photos of Hastings commercial and residential buildings taken in the past 15 or so years. Let me know if you have any need of any of them. They are mainly of the eastern end and central Hastings, but some could be used with modeller's license elsewhere.

Edited by phil_sutters

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In case it is of any interest I have just uploaded a map, in six over-lapping sections of Hastings in circa 1884, into my gallery at http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/gallery/album/4270-map-of-hastings/ I have a fair number of photos of Hastings buildings taken in the past 15 or so years. Let me know if you have any need of any of them. They are mainly of the eastern end and central Hastings, but some could be used with modeller's license elsewhere.

hi there,

 

unfortunately the most recent guises of Hastings station date from 2014 and prior to that, 1930/31 so the architecture is quite far out. however, if you've got any photos of the goods yards and as you say, the eastern end, I'd very much appreciate them!

 

 

I'll take a look at that map when I get home (I'm on my phone atm), it should give some suggestions to dimensions etc but otherwise will be a bit too early for my period.

 

modelling this decade is much harder than I'd imagined!

 

-alex

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hi there,

 

unfortunately the most recent guises of Hastings station date from 2014 and prior to that, 1930/31 so the architecture is quite far out. however, if you've got any photos of the goods yards and as you say, the eastern end, I'd very much appreciate them!

 

 

I'll take a look at that map when I get home (I'm on my phone atm), it should give some suggestions to dimensions etc but otherwise will be a bit too early for my period.

 

modelling this decade is much harder than I'd imagined!

 

-alex

I should have made myself a little clearer. The photos I have of buildings are of non-railway subjects, which might be of use in the scenery department. The map's scale is 4 inches to the mile. Each square is a quarter of a mile square.

Finding photos and other details that fit your period and location can be hard work. I have been fortunate that I have a book from which I can get almost all the information I need. Without it I wouldn't have started my current project - a diorama of a much condensed version of the Somerset & Dorset Joint Railway's Highbridge Wharf, in the late 1920s. I lived a few hundred yards from it in my teens, when it was on its last legs. I did take a handful of photos at the time. I am not going for a working model layout as I don't want to update all my 50-year-old locos and stock.

Best wishes with your project. Can I suggest that you don't just look to railway sources for your information and photos. Local history libraries and county archives often have a wealth of pictures. Sometimes they come as donations from family or local business collections, showing Uncle Bob working as a yard foreman or the offices of the coal merchants in the goods yards. I worked briefly in one in Southwark and know that they had photos of railway scenes in among their files. Very often they do not have the resources to digitize them and put them on line, sometimes not even to catalogue them. So it's a case of finding time - pretty well impossible if you are studying, I guess - to visit the library, archive or records office and look through what they have got.

Edited by phil_sutters

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is it the Hornby or the Bachmann?

Thank you for your kind works but honestly, anyone can do what I do and even better with just patience haha. The chassis is indeed a Bachmann one, took me a fair while to get it mind you on eBay for a price that i was prepared to pay.

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Hi Alex,

 

I've just come across this interesting thread, and must make the time to read through it.  

 

One immediate comment, don't rely TOO heavily on the old Roche drawings, they are not always exact.

 

All the best,

Dave.

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Hi Alex,

 

I'm not sure what your reference material is, but a really good resource is "A Pictorial Record of of Southern Locos"  by JH Russell.

Not cheap but lots of secondhand copies around, one here on Amazon  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pictorial-Record-Southern-Locomotives-Russell/dp/0860934438

 

An excellent online resource is the Southern E-group, their gallery index is here:  http://www.semgonline.com/photoind.html

 

Apologies if you know all this!

 

Cheers, Dave.

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Hello there!

 

I've looked at your thread a few times, and I've always been so envious of your use of plasticard- anything I attempt in that medium just becomes a soggy, stringy sad mess.

 

The 3f chassis I've heard good things about, is it the Hornby or the Bachmann? It looks like the latter. The Hornby one is an okay runner, from previous experience, but is a pain to fit into the boiler of the C class. Just got to keep my eyes peeled for a damaged Bachmann example I suppose!

 

Keep on making me jealous, it's motivation to get my modelling standards up!

 

- Alex

 

Alex as Andy G points out you may be using a solvent that is too aggressive and I agree Limonene is good stuff.  The other problem is that you may be applying too much solvent.  I have a bottle of Tamiya Thin Cement on the go at the moment.  It comes with a brush built into the lid.  Now the brush is fine (actually no it is very coarse) for sticking big bits of Tamiya kits together, but for sticking fine pieces it is very very difficult to use without making a real mess.  For many years I used an old 000 paint brush.  It had seen its life out painting and had lost at least half the bristles before it was promoted to solvent application.  When I finally chucked it it had 3 bristles left and it was superb for attaching those very fine details.

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Hi Alex,

 

I'm not sure what your reference material is, but a really good resource is "A Pictorial Record of of Southern Locos"  by JH Russell.

Not cheap but lots of secondhand copies around, one here on Amazon  https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pictorial-Record-Southern-Locomotives-Russell/dp/0860934438

 

An excellent online resource is the Southern E-group, their gallery index is here:  http://www.semgonline.com/photoind.html

 

Apologies if you know all this!

 

Cheers, Dave.

 

I agree.  it has an outline drawing at 4mm scale of just about everything that lasted until Grouping.  If you combine it with the detailed notes from the relevant RCTS volume, you pretty much have what you need in most cases.

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Hello everyone,

 

I'd like to start by just saying I don't know what's happening with Photobucket, all I know is that apparently they don't allow photo sharing anymore on forums and so I'll have to host my photos elsewhere or I'll have to upgrade my membership (or work out how to share photos direct from my laptop. Should be fun.)

 

Secondly, it turns out that the 700 and C class tenders didn't share their wheelbase- the wheelbase from the 700 subframe was out by at least six scale inches when under the C tender, so I'll have to turn to another route for that. I know someone on the forum has created a 3D print for a sub-chassis; I'm waiting for them to send me the PDF of this design, and then I'll look at having it printed up (I wouldn't have thought it too expensive for such a little thing).

 

I'm also still waiting for a suitable locomotive chassis to turn up, but I can bide my time with that. In the meantime, I think I'm going to try my hand at designing some sides for the Hastings restriction Pullman cars- in theory, all one needs to do is cut away the underframe from a Hornby Pullman, cut out the overlength 6'4'' (2.5cm) and cut out the sides as one would with a Comet overlay. Then the roof detail would need to be amended and the underframe detail reinstated, but asides from this, it seems straightforward (but as I am learning, modelling is anything BUT.)

 

I believe the sides could also be used for the SECR parlour cars, such as Topaz (I have a list of names of other cars built to its specification- if anyone would like to see this, please PM me.) I'm considering scale drawing the proposed sides on graph paper, then scanning them into my laptop and possibly trying to work something out with a CAD programme (and here is where she gives away the fact she knows b*gger all about computers and graphic design...)

 

Over on Bluelightening's threads, I see he's working on some Brighton six wheel clerestory saloons- I believe I also have some of these patterns from Railway Constructor. Some plasticard and a six wheel chassis are in order, methinks. One day, just one day, I WILL finish the projects I start before moving onto something else. And even better, when I find somewhere to live, I'll even build a layout! Even if it's a board with a circle on it I'll be happy.

 

Many thanks,

 

Alex

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In a purely selfish way (I log on in work and the spambot doesn't allow pictures to show from any of the online hosting sites) can you upload your pictures direct to here please?

 

Scan the drawings and then load them into something like silhouette studio (free download) and trace over them. It took me about a four hours to learn the basics and then you can email the drawings to me and I'll cut them for you. Simples!

 

Andy G

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