Jump to content
We are aware of the intermittent site speed issues at the moment. Please be patient and don't repeatedly click things as that compounds the issue.

Recommended Posts

Using the technique @Jack P utilised on his own Birdcage repaint, I stripped the glazing out of the carriages and used some white spirit on cotton buds, gently buffing the lettering and numbers away until the surface paint was exposed. I need some more primer anyway, so these will go into grey before I use Halfords Vauxhall Brazil Brown which I think is what I used for my Cavill van.

 

A set of buffers for the set is around £25 from Markits, so they will be ordered next month, I should expect, then I'll spray the chassis entirely in matte black. Not quite right for the livery I don't think, but once they're weathered it should come together alright. 

 

I'm aware that the ventilators are too modern, but I don't think they're too noticeable an error? 

 

I have another coach project in the pipeline, that will be posted once I've got more parts to get that in motion. 

 

I'd like to get my Brighton J tank build finished fairly soon, I've let that lapse, as I was trying to write that up for the Brighton Circle Modeller's Digest, as with my B2 for the SECRSoc Modeller's Gazette. Need to get back on the wagon with those projects.

 

I'm conscious of budgeting recently - I'm saving for driving lessons and a car (I live opposite a driving school now!), so being sensible with outgoings is something to consider. 

 

That's all for now really, nothing much else to update with. 

IMG_20200906_170140.jpg

  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking good Alex, The most time consuming part (by far) are the window surrounds. I find that a toothpick offers the best way of keeping the painting neat.

 

I've found when fitting sprung buffers you need to make a  few holes in the chassis - I'll take some photos later to show what I mean.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some photos

 

50313958352_dc8e2033fa_h.jpg

 

I drilled 3 holes with a 3mm drill bit, and then used a knife to open the holes into the slot you can see

 

50313958297_75d3161836_h.jpg

 

'Scuse fingers. You can see that the holes are a bit longer than they need to be. I found that when screwing the securing 'nut' onto the back of the buffer, the romford/markits screwdriver was easier to use with the larger hole.

 

For what it's worth, I found the bachman couplings are ok on the ends of the sets, but internally they kept coming undone as they aren't particularly free moving or heavy. Roxey couplings sorted this issue out for me.

 

Hope this helps!

Edited by Jack P
English bad
  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

It isn't. If this is referring to the video posted a few pages back, I thought this got established - what appears to be a junction is actually Folkestone Harbour station (as it was in the 1900s). Apart from anything else the two R class locos on the front of the train are the big indicator.

 

Here is a plan of the Harbour station from 1905 (credit to https://kentrail.org.uk/folkestone_harbour.htm for the image).

 

Note where the lower ends of the platforms are. The junction is actually the tracks leading to the carriage berthing sidings. The train was filmed from the foot of the right hand platform (the one numbered 5 in the diagram), looking across to the signal box (numbered 3 in the diagram) on the other platform. The footbridge in the background is the one that linked the station to the pier.

 

image.png.4a784aa40f0caaa71704d1a5f98b166d.png

Edited by SD85
  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 07/09/2020 at 15:31, AVS1998 said:

Coming back to the discussion from some weeks ago regarding the LNWR train at Folkestone and the strange junction no-one could agree upon, might I suggest Swanley? 

 

 

unnamed (8).jpg

This is definitely the old station at Swanley Junction (before the 1930s rebuild).  The same photo appears on Disused Stations - http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/s/swanley_junction/index.shtml

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
3 hours ago, Tom Burnham said:

This is definitely the old station at Swanley Junction (before the 1930s rebuild).  The same photo appears on Disused Stations - http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/s/swanley_junction/index.shtml

As I linked to a couple of weeks ago:

On 07/09/2020 at 21:13, Regularity said:

Looking at the Disused stations website, Sandling had a different footbridge.

 

It is Swanley.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is something that may prove interesting;

 

 In 1904 the LNWR and L&YR held a joint conference in Hastings, but protested when asked whether any services were planned to the town that no, the directors just thought the town was 'convenient' and 'a nice place to visit'. It's a pain to get to, how can it possibly be a 'convenient' conference venue?!

 

It's food for thought, though - through L&YR carriages with the LNWR, perhaps? Maybe there would be through ticketing from L&Y stations (I know this existed for some Southern destinations) on LNWR southbound trains, using  NW stock? 

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you think Hastings is a pain to get to, I would advise looking at places which were only served by a slow and infrequent train service to the nearest small junction station by only one company, rather than a place with a substantial station, relatively quick and frequent services to London from two competing companies and a good number of connections to other nearby towns.

 

I'd say it's fairly convenient, particularly if travelling from London as I expect (but don't know) many of the directors of both companies would've been, regardless of the areas served by the companies.

  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Good evening everyone, and happy holidays to you all!

 

I've not been too idle with projects lately - I've been preoccupied with writing and 'real' work, granted, but I haven't entirely given up on modelling!

 

My Birdcage set is looking ever closer to completion. I sprayed the bodies in a dark grey primer, then painted the ends in a matte black and the sides in Precision SECR Lake (I've outgrown my dislike of the shade, I think);

 

image.png.7ae4d114653296384cbae216da93fd0d.png

 

And to accompany this longer set, I've acquired the first of a shorter trio, a kit by Mallard I believe, which will have a companion in due course. This kit came with far more than I expected, I suspect the seller may have forgotten some pieces were in there. I've got wheels that are suitable. The paint recommendation baffled me -  Sovereign Purple Lake. Google it. It's not just me that thinks it looks very, very purple? There is a company called Sovereign Hobbies, so I wonder if it's a colour they previously carried? Otherwise, Winsor and Newton do a very nice purple lake...

 

 It's how I've always imagined SE(C)R Lake, at least in its earlier iteration, but compared to the Phoenix and Bachmann colour, it's so purple as to look odd. But we've been here before. Once I've got the other brake end, I'll probably paint the whole set into this redder Lake and just enjoy having some variation;

 

image.png.80ea04016d9375d6d3d3e644fb69d903.png

 

The King Arthur has received a coal load, deliberately intended to look dwindled. A new frame extension still needs to be made, and transfers/plates bought and fitted. That's a small job that can be done anytime, though I am anxious to actually get the beast weathered eventually;

 

image.png.06636cf33c5b172561a74e3b3a6d395c.png

 

image.png.2209ccec5da83fb39eb186f47106e10c.png

 

Two Maunsell sets, one Eastbourne/Kent Coast R1 and one Hastings R0, are slowly being worked on. These need new etched sides. I think Bill Bedford still makes the ones I need, but I'll put in a bulk order for those when I'm ready, or I'll go with Roxey (They sell coach sides seperately, don't they?).

 

 I'm keeping the Hornby carriages for the Hornby set and the Kirk ones for the other, so that there's some standardisation there. Even the Kirks have had their wheels replaced for Hornby 14mm sets and their ride height adjusted to match throughout, and have had Kadees inside the sets, with buffers glued in the retracted position. Brake ends will have screw links and sprung buffers (Kirks with their usual moulded buffers).

 

An E4 I bought from @Skinnylinny, which was set to become 477 Blackstone, unfortunately had a reaction with the spray varnish after I repainted it, so that will be stripped and fully repainted (I was never a fan of Bachmann's strange green). @Javier L's E4 safety valves and chimney make the model more appropriate to its prototype; 

 

image.png.bddf0771e29c8b44f988ed0cc0f43853.png

 

 

image.png.a9593e29edf81b6ff52816dd2a31aac7.png

 

 

The two wooden wagon kits are closer to painting, too. 

 

I finally printed out the track plan that @BlueLightning and @Corbs helped me out with (read: I gave them the requirements, they drew it up... One day, AnyRail, I will learn how to use you. One day. But for now, you scare me.) and I'll be piecing that together in the new year. I'm really going to push to at least get the boards done, I've sat on the Blackstone project soon enough and I'm annoyed at myself for not acting on it. Even if the boards sit in the attic (ooh, there's an idea - there's space after all) it's still something achieved. Also means my layout thread won't be sat idle much longer, with any luck. 

 

So, that's it for now. Not an enormous amount, but it's kept me busy.

 

Have a very merry few days and I'll chime in again soon!

 

- Alex 

 

 

image.png

image.png

  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alex.

 

Seasons greetings.

 

Looking at the coach kit parts laid out, I see the horrible vacu-formed coach rooves. Did you use them on your coaches ?

 

I have found them very difficult to cut accurately and also I think that they deteriorate over a period of time and become quite brittle due to the heated shaping process.

 

I have a number of similar etched brass kits and am also looking at cutting and shutting various plastic kit parts to make S.E. & C.R. derived EMUs, and have seen Mr Isinglass at a couple of exhibitions printing pairs of coach rooves back to back on his 3D printing machine. Fairly basic and will need some careful rubbing down to get them smooth, although a little bit of texture would not look unrealistic. I discussed the possibility of getting suitable ones done to the S.E. & C.R. profile, but they will also need some extra bits done for the birdcage extensions. At the moment I have not committed to getting any done though.

 

All the best

 

Ray

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ray, 

 

I confess I've never built an etched kit before and I wasn't too keen on the look of those roofs. I'm tempted to try a sheet of plastic card instead although those printed alternatives sound highly intriguing - something to investigate. 

 

The vacuum roofs deteriorating doesn't surprise me, they are very thin indeed. Thankfully on this kit the birdcage roof comes with a little etch of its own so it's just the main coach that needs a hat, so to speak! 

 

Ideally I need some bending bars to bend the brass flaps cleanly, too... Or I need to make friends with a local modeller. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, AVS1998 said:

Ideally I need some bending bars to bend the brass flaps cleanly, too... Or I need to make friends with a local modeller. 

You should invest in a 'hold and fold'.  Not cheap, but I wouldn't be without mine, especially when one side of the bend is narrow.

 

Jim

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Another brass SE(C)R kit arrived yesterday, a Bill Bedford/Mousa 1889 33' six-wheel second;

 

image.png.a49d5b4fdece910d6e8a4d88134248b1.png

 

Sprung axles and sprung buffers were both surprise features to me, but I look forward to getting them to work. My birthday is near the end of the month, so I may treat myself to some soldering iron tips (I've currently only got a pointed tip on my temperature controlled iron) in order to make building this and the other brass kit. It'll use up the last of my Mansells though - I'll have to order more eventually. 

 

Luckily, the vacuum roof from the Mallard kit fits this perfectly, too, and there's enough length for both carriages.

 

I'm glad this kit looks a lot easier than the Mallard - the brass is thicker and doesn't distort when bent. All I need to do now is find out more details on the prototypes... 

 

 - Alex

  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alex.

 

I have a set of those etchings put by from some time ago. I did not realise that Bill now did 3D printed fixtures and fittings for them. I will have to have a look at his website to see if these are available separately and if he does similar ones for his other kits which included an early S.E.R. four wheeled guards break (different to the Branchlines one) and a couple of ex-L.B. & S.C.R. Isle of Wight bogie coaches. He only did a few Southern kits/sets of etchings when I bought mine, so hopefully not too much outlay required. 

 

All the best

Ray

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Good evening all,

@Skinnylinny and I were re-reading Weddell earlier tonight, comparing notes we'd found in other books on pre-grouping coaching stock, and we noticed that the D. 131 and D. 410 ex-LSWR BCKs, which we already knew of, had been dual-braked for working the aforementioned service. In addition to this, while discussing the merits of a 4mm representation of the clerestory dining saloons in their main iterations, it became apparent that these had also been used (or at least intended for use) on long-distance journeys from Bournemouth. It's because of this that I was pondering on their (highly unlikely) use on such trains from Dover.

This service had existed since at least 1911, with GWR, SECR, GCR and Midland portions (the train divided at Tonbridge, with the Midland continuing up to Metroland) and, as I've just learned, possibly an LSWR arm, too; 

[on the LSWR clerestory dining cars]: ''The first two, nos 78 and 79 which were built in mid-1910, were described in Volume One of Railway and Travel Monthly as intended for the Bournemouth to Birkenhead and Sheffield through service via Basingstoke and the Great Western Railway'' (Weddell, V. 2, p. 118). 

Now, I'm wondering if, since the BCKs were transferred to Kent and we know that in later years these through services used Maunsell dining saloons, as well as having the relevant foreign company provide (to a certain date) catering, too, whether these LSWR clerestories might have seen service - albeit brief - in Kent during the 1920s, or whether travellers would have to make do until the LSWR/other portion of the train was attached at Reading/Banbury? 

 

It appears the GWR and GCR both provided catering on some level, but I'm unclear on the particulars.

I hope that question makes sense!

  • Like 4
  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, AVS1998 said:

It appears the GWR and GCR both provided catering on some level, but I'm unclear on the particulars.

The GCR built two six car trains in 1911 for the Bournemouth - Manchester and Bournemouth -Newcastle services. The sets were made up of: BCK, CK, RTO, RCK, CGK, BCK. The Newcastle service was shared on alternate days with a LSWR set, I presume that the Manchester service was originally the same, but I have no information about it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 26/12/2020 at 16:21, Caley Jim said:

You should invest in a 'hold and fold'.  Not cheap, but I wouldn't be without mine, especially when one side of the bend is narrow.

 

Jim

 

What sort of tool do you use?  There seem to be various types.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...