Jump to content

Recommended Posts

 

Ooohh! Goody, looks promising, loads of luck and best wishes with the outcome! Where's the pyramid/s?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooohh! Goody, looks promising, loads of luck and best wishes with the outcome! Where's the pyramid/s?

I thought they'd all been sold and delivered to Castle Aching, where they are now presumably in the middle of a war zone. :jester:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Mr Northroader, Sir, what this is telling you is that I'm close to notching-up enough DIY-credits to allow planning (if not actuall work quite yet) to remove Broom Cupboard Hill.

 

And, yes, I should have marked The Metropolitan Pyramid Company's siding as such on the plan. They continue to prosper (well, get by); while battles rage across the plains of West Norfolk, their latest installations remain, thus far, unscathed.

 

Kevin

post-26817-0-99602100-1488121859_thumb.png

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, this should be interesting, and no plastic.  How about Bakerlite?  I will look forward to the town being built.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This reprobate, captured on film by my Grandfather, may or may not have been involved in the removal of ancient artifacts - viz  pyramids - on behalf the Metropolitan Pyramid Company.

post-14351-0-21440500-1488128433_thumb.jpg

His accomplice may be this man seen with a sizeable chunk, of something that could be pyramid, hidden in this load of vegetation, in close proximity to the railway station. The appropriate goods terminal for this traffic should surely have been the Bricklayers Arms.

post-14351-0-12034000-1488128431_thumb.jpg

Edited by phil_sutters
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Chris, what should turn up on the next train in, but a Bakelite van, courtesy of the Leeds Model Company, 1940s vintage.

 

Considering that the alternatives on the market were tinplate, or wood kits, which took massive skill to get looking good, these were very good models indeed, brake-gear aside.

 

I think LMC might have been the first to produce mounded plastic model railway vehicles in GB, starting just before WW2.

 

K

post-26817-0-38291000-1488130102_thumb.jpg

post-26817-0-09217700-1488130983_thumb.png

Edited by Nearholmer
  • Like 15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Chris, what should turn up on the next train in, but a Bakelite van, courtesy of the Leeds Model Company, 1940s vintage.

 

Considering that the alternatives on the market were tinplate, or wood kits, which took massive skill to get looking good, these were very good models indeed, brake-gear aside.

 

K

I am sure you know that there is a Bakelite museum. I only know because I watch Salvage Hunters.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure you know that there is a Bakelite museum. I only know because I watch Salvage Hunters.

I used to live a few miles away, but never got round to visiting. Maybe I will one day, as a grockle rather than a local resident!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright, then, before we get to Tintin and Poirot, what about Paul Delvaux? Who? Google and go to images, (please do, just make sure there's no one around to say "perving again, eh, grandad?") Artist, who painted trains and nudes, i.e. a proper artist. He has featured on RMweb in the proper place:http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/76860-a-discussion-on-railway-art/page-3#ipboard_body

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright, then, before we get to Tintin and Poirot, what about Paul Delvaux? Who? Google and go to images, (please do, just make sure there's no one around to say "perving again, eh, grandad?") Artist, who painted trains and nudes, i.e. a proper artist. He has featured on RMweb in the proper place:http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/76860-a-discussion-on-railway-art/page-3#ipboard_body

I found great inspiration in Belgian art - this was a birthday card I created, I was going to say knocked up, but realised it had at least one other meaning, for my brother-in-law who had chauffeured us on a trip to Bruges.

post-14351-0-02007600-1488225187_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought two of those bakelite LMS corridor coaches from Tydsley & Holbrook on Deansgate, Manchester around 1957. They must have been inexpensive because I only earned a few quid weekends cleaning cars. Within 12 months I was into wine, women & song and goodbye 0 gauge for nearly 60 years.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about Leo Tindemanns?  Belgian PM.

 

I was told that either Gosciny or Udezo, of Asterix fame was Belgian but it is not true I have just found.

 

Eddie Merckx, 5 time winner of the Tour de France,

 

and of course his son who was called by the obvious name of a champion on two wheels, Axel Merckx.

 

Sorry, played this before but the names above are new to me as being Belgian.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Kev, good to see your layout with all that nice track and pointery  but how do you manage to switch them all manually when trains are thundering around?  While I revel in old Hornby track, (nothing younger than me), I do like those that are on your layout which is about the same size as mine. Which brand is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian,

 

The track is Maldon, which is effectively a replica of maerklin or Hornby solid rail track from the 1930s, but with NS, rather than steel, rail, and ABS, rather than steel, sleepers. I had bad experience of tinplate track when I was a small boy, which put me off for life!

 

Phil and Chris

 

I think it is probably larger than 0 gauge, though.

post-26817-0-50746300-1488228736.jpg

Edited by Nearholmer
  • Like 7
  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mantelpiece is bigger than yours

- print found in a house in north Somerset passed to my father, who identified the photographer as A.H.Malan. This was confirmed when it and two similar prints were offered to NRM. They forwarded them to The National Archive where the main body of Malan's archive is held.

post-14351-0-39467900-1488235748_thumb.jpg

Edited by phil_sutters
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can have it in concrete as well

 

post-26540-0-12551100-1488294396_thumb.jpg

Edited by Northroader
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.