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12 hours ago, bruce palmer said:

Re the prewar BL wagons ...great as far as Im concerned . Nearholmer, I think I have a bag of those autocouplers some where  if you need some . Bruce

 

I would be interested in half a dozen.

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21 hours ago, GRASinBothell said:

Of course, Ace has produced the Met/LT coaches since then, which is possibly the source of the design/tooling for the suburban coaches, with different artwork.

 

That could be the answer! The recent "in sets" BR coaches have more one more compartment, and a shorter van section, in the brake coach than the C1 type (which have unusually large van sections), and that does indeed align with the Met coaches. I'd been trying to work out what tooling they were from.

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This is the way to do it, right?

 

image.png.0915c7a79298f1bf65f45a908eb4ca3d.png

 

Unfortunately my Schools had the bolt on the crosshead either break or ping off so is yet again, out of commision - but above shows the King Arthuer and the rake of four LBSCR coaches that the Terrier absolutely cannot shift :biggrin_mini2:

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4 hours ago, sncf231e said:

Even the music is deliberately old fashioned ;):

 

 

Regards

Fred

Looks like a cross between an LMS class 2 and a Claud to my eyes.

 

atb

 

Phil.

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3 hours ago, Lacathedrale said:

rake of four LBSCR coaches that the Terrier absolutely cannot shift


That is worth investigating further, because I reckon to get 12 axles of passenger stock hauled by an ETS Terrier.
 

It is probably a function of excessive drag somewhere, most likely the crude axle-bearings that are a bit of an issue with ‘modern tinplate’  - old tinplate tended to use ‘knife edge’ bearings, a hole in a bit of tin, which are surprisingly low-drag, but a lot of modern stuff has cast axle-boxes In which the bearing-hole is sometimes Very poorly formed. Oiling the bearing can help a lot. Also look for excessive contact pressure on any spoons or finger-contacts used for lighting.

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I’ve found that with that generation of Darstaed six-wheelers manufacturing QC was distinctly lacking, so that it is necessary to do a bit of de-burring, fettling, and fiddling to improve performance, not just on axle-bearings but on the radius-arms on the Cleminson system, and other parts too. It’s also worth oiling the bearings and greasing the radius arms. Once sorted, they present no problem down to 24” radius curves.

 

I only owned a LBSCR rake of six-wheelers very briefly, because as soon as I put them on the track there was an impressive display of sparks and flashes resulting from the wiring of the lighting being incorrect, causing a spectacular short circuit! A definite QC failing. When I took them back, I ended-up swapping them for LBSCR bogie coaches.

 

I actually prefer the Ace six-wheelers, because they have a better radius-arm design, but Ace didn’t make them in Brighton colours.

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9 hours ago, Metropolitan H said:

I thought the number series was nearer that of the ex GCR "Directors"??

 

Regards

 Chris H

I knew Directors as Clauds.Spashers are different to 2Ps or Clauds,though.

atb 

Phil

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Like all of the 1930s and earlier ‘generics’, it has small references to all sorts of different things, so that we can all see in it what we wish to see.

 

Prince Charles originated in the 1927 Duke of York design, which was specifically for low-cost, high-volume production, and was then simplified (individual splashers changed to a combined splasher) to make Prolincess Elizabeth in 1932, and got new colours to become Prince Charles post-WW2. 
 

I quite like good generics, and they were certainly optimised to work well on tight curves.

 

 

Edited by Nearholmer
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Fiddling-around working out the detail baseboard joining and track-alignment for the vest-pocket vari-layout, which isn’t entirely successful as a way of distracting me from the doom-forecast on The World at One.

 

 

F1EF5EDA-1F98-4491-898F-EA0CBD093A76.jpeg

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Back to Terriers and Darstaed six-wheelers.

 

Here is such a loco with a rake of four, happily negotiating the 27” radius corner On my ‘bar flap’ section (hence the More than usually distracting background - the orange thing is s reflection of my shoulder, I think).


442EEEB3-05C4-46A1-B447-114AA8CD0799.jpeg.cd158dab991c19ba41027478d995ed55.jpeg

 

This train always makes me think of the Hayling Branch, although that may have gone straight from four-wheelers to bogie coaches, so here Birlstone becomes the bay platform at Havant.

 

F34A13D0-2D21-4334-BE86-A28CB841B4B3.jpeg.794d74322491760c9070a6e1d29afc3a.jpeg

 

 

Edited by Nearholmer
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Love the black terrier, I have one too and it’s a very well made model. I just wish WJ Vintage/ETS put isolating switches on their locos as it makes operating ‘Old Albion’ a challenge if using them and other locos.

 

Speaking of WJV, and apologies if slightly OT, did anyone else notice the newsletter article featuring a delightful ETS made prototype of  the narrow gauge ‘Dolgoch’ of TR fame? I’ve expressed an interest as it would make a lovely set with the coaches and provide something different coarse scale wise (appreciating it was shown to run on standard 3 rail track). 
 

Greg 

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Oh yes! I have a ‘skate’ made from a piece of 1.6mm ply to slide under the spoons when isolating the mildly-frustrating ETS locos. Mind you, old BL ones are the same, so I really need to add more isolating switches/sections.

 

B636 is, of course, Fenchurch, and the plain black livery Is how she looked after coming into SR ownership when Newhaven Harbour Company was integrated into the SR (I think it was previously a wholly-owned subsidiary). She remained at Newhaven for years thereafter, so might be inappropriate elsewhere. I thought the ETS SR green ones had over-emphatic lining, even by coarse-scale standards, which is why I chose black.

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1 hour ago, Nearholmer said:

Oh yes! I have a ‘skate’ made from a piece of 1.6mm ply to slide under the spoons when isolating the mildly-frustrating ETS locos. Mind you, old BL ones are the same, so I really need to add more isolating switches/sections.

 

B636 is, of course, Fenchurch, and the plain black livery Is how she looked after coming into SR ownership when Newhaven Harbour Company was integrated into the SR (I think it was previously a wholly-owned subsidiary). She remained at Newhaven for years thereafter, so might be inappropriate elsewhere. I thought the ETS SR green ones had over-emphatic lining, even by coarse-scale standards, which is why I chose black.

I remember when 72 had "Fenchurch" on the left-hand tank side and "Newhaven Harbour Company" on the right (starboard?).

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There’s a good selection of preservation era pictures here https://preservedbritishsteamlocomotives.com/32636-lbscr-72-fenchurch-sr-b636-sr-2636-br-32636/

 

I remember NHCo livery and I think she may have been like that for the 100th birthday celebrations, although maybe with Fenchurch on both sides by then. Worrying to think that will be half a century ago come 2022! Hope to God that the plague has abated sufficiently to allow a proper 150th bash - definitely one I’d want to attend.

 

 

919C18A0-3FDD-4C11-8121-A7CB20708A7B.jpeg

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"From 1950 until withdrawal in November 1963 32636 had the distinction of being the oldest locomotive in British Railway stock."

 

Until withdrawal in November 1951, 22630, an ex-Midland Kirtley 700 Class 0-6-0 built by Dubs in March 1870, would, I believe, claim that distinction.

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I got confused about scale and gauge in that piece about an ETS tinplate Dolgoch, but it did look rather nice. Not for me though, because my problem is that I’ve ‘opened too many fronts’, rather that that I need to open more!


Lurking in cupboards I have a fair bit of 45mm gauge garden railway gubbins, some scratch-built, some adapted LGB feldbahn, a small accumulation of Hornby Dublo 2-rail, and even a SM32 ‘diesel’ loco and a string of skips. One day, not today obviously, I really need to rationalise!

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