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Show us your Pugbashes, Nellieboshes, Desmondifications, Jintysteins

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5 hours ago, SteelAndSoot said:

Say I was just wondering if someone could help me with this.

 

I have a plan for another pugbash but to do so I will need to remove the body from the chassis. I don't have a soldering iron so if the wires where to become detached from the motor it would be very inconvenient as I would then need to buy a iron.

 

So I was wondering if the body can be removed from the chassis without moving the motor as from all the diagrams I can find show the motor unable to be removed without the wires being detached.

 

have no idea if it can be removed easily or not.

 

Are we talking the Caley Pug/Smokey Joe type or the e-Dapol L&Y type?

 

On the Caley, I believe the body just comes off by releasing a couple of screws.

 

The L&Y type has a two part body - the cab unclips and I can't just remember how the forward superstructure comes off, but as the motor's in the cab I shouldn't think you'd need to remove it.

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On ‎11‎/‎07‎/‎2019 at 11:51, Martin S-C said:

Thanks. I think the general arrangement of these vehicles was broadly similar wherever they were used. The one below has dumb buffers front and rear and seems to have an open front for access to the coal. The arrangement of running board and short wheelbase makes me think more and more that a Hornby or Bachmann GW shunters truck could be a good source - of the chassis at least.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_07/post-25077-0-54385900-1545929976.jpg.4f62889e3ccd035ccef7205e1917f6c9.jpg

These tenders were generally rather shorter/older than any r-t-r open wagon, the one in the picture looks to have been built on the chassis of an ancient (1850s/60s) 4-ton or 6-ton mineral wagon. I'm guessing there's someone out there who offers kits of such things, but it's not really on my radar.

 

If you can hack locos, shortening a Slaters or Cambrian wagon kit to produce something suitable shouldn't be difficult, and has the added advantage that you don't need to take it apart first.

 

John

Edited by Dunsignalling

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While surfing about looking for pictures of turbine locomotives, I found this..

 

5724E241-28C4-4907-82BC-0C3F11E024F9.jpeg.b1a373e3e247d681cb02470e5ca021a5.jpeg

 

it appears to be an experimental loco fitted with quadruple turbines, built in Italy in 1905 and apparently incorporating the cab sides from a L&Y Pug. Here’s a challenge for someone! 

Edited by rockershovel
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2 hours ago, rockershovel said:

While surfing about looking for pictures of turbine locomotives, I found this..

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/5724E241-28C4-4907-82BC-0C3F11E024F9.jpeg.b1a373e3e247d681cb02470e5ca021a5.jpeg

 

it appears to be an experimental loco fitted with quadruple turbines, built in Italy in 1905 and apparently incorporating the cab sides from a L&Y Pug. Here’s a challenge for someone! 

Nice tee-boiler to hide a motor too...

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Could be good for the newer bodied trainset loco.

Edited by AlfaZagato

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3 hours ago, sir douglas said:

Belluzzo had a bit of a daily express/mail style later career - becoming a fascist then promoting bizarre UFO theories! The idea that the 4 turbines were independent is peculiar. Were they free to rotate on their axles? I cant see how that would work without it crabbing on the track if one side rotates differently to the other.

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32 minutes ago, brack said:

Belluzzo had a bit of a daily express/mail style later career - becoming a fascist then promoting bizarre UFO theories! The idea that the 4 turbines were independent is peculiar. Were they free to rotate on their axles? I cant see how that would work without it crabbing on the track if one side rotates differently to the other.

 

I seem to recall that Italian fascists famously “made the trains run in time” so presumably, that wasn’t a problem? 

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27 minutes ago, rockershovel said:

 

I seem to recall that Italian fascists famously “made the trains run in time” so presumably, that wasn’t a problem? 

I suspect that weird 040t might have been an exception....

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3 hours ago, rockershovel said:

 

I seem to recall that Italian fascists famously “made the trains run in time” so presumably, that wasn’t a problem? 

 

In actual fact, they made ONE train run on time - which is relatively easy to do, you just delay everything else that might get in its way!

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Oooh.. I believe that Belluzo locomotive qualifies for Bulleid's Law.*

 

 

*Bulleid's Law: The more ugly a machine appears in reality the more likely it is to be admired by a large percent of the train nerds.

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On 10/08/2019 at 16:34, Poor Old Bruce said:

 

Just to point out that the "split axle" wheelsets, as produced by some RTR manufacturers won't work with a metal chassis or etched W-irons. They create a short circuit!

Only if the chassis halves are not insulated Metal chassis halves with split axle wheels produces a very nearly friction free power collecting wagon, just make sure the chassis halves are insulated from each other.

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Here’s a build in its first stages - Dapol J94 basis, with a Hornby E2 smokebox and chimney. 

 

Not exactly based on any particular prototype, but following Jessie in general appearance.

40C245BD-D81F-486F-80C0-6B78DC78B114.jpeg

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38 minutes ago, RosiesBoss said:

Here's another project which has used the smokebox, saddle tank and backhead of a Hornby Smokey Joe:

 

Construction details are here: https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/148059-gwr-2195-cwm-mawr-project/

 

Above the running plate that really looks like NPFR/BPGV "Margaret", on display at Scolton Manor.  

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Thank you, Northmoor for your observation. I agree that the two designs are generally similar, but Margaret was built by Fox Walker and Cwm Mawr by Avonside. Margaret has no external coal bunker, whereas Cwm Mawr does. I imagine that, above the footplate, GWR "standardisation" came into play, hence the family resemblance.

 

Regards,

 

Rob

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I rather like the proportions of that bash Vanguard; makes me think of an enlarged Hunslet 48150 class, which were a precursor to the 50550s and then the Austerity/J94 designs themselves.

 

(Image courtesy of H.A. Gamble of The Industrial Railway Record)

REDBOURN_25.jpg

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Another example is Hunslet 1825 of 1938, preserved as PWD79 in the NSW Railway Museum, ThirlmerePWD79,_NSW_Railway_Museum,_29_Jan_2019_b.JPG.da7ab60d04fd521b33f34dcd58b66c8d.JPG.

 

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2 hours ago, Captain Pugbash said:

Don't mind if i just....

Be my guest :-)  I think we probably both owe John Ryan royalties. I also think Cut-Throat Jake may have our number....

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