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KNP

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I go away for a week, come back and your ALL still discussing the Canopy Nudging thing, just brilliant to see such humour and matched by equally excellent photography Kevin.

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13 minutes ago, Andrew P said:

I go away for a week, come back and your ALL still discussing the Canopy Nudging thing, just brilliant to see such humour and matched by equally excellent photography Kevin.

 

Thanks Andy.

 

Hope you had a good break and look forward to catch up with whatever layout it was you built whilst on holiday!

 

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On ‎12‎/‎07‎/‎2019 at 14:48, Andrew P said:

I go away for a week, come back and your ALL still discussing the Canopy Nudging thing, just brilliant to see such humour and matched by equally excellent photography Kevin.

I think there are still one or two canopy nudging kits left in the shops with the free book 'Nudging for Beginners ':crazy_mini:

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I was reading some old MRC magazines last night and came across this advert from 1960. It reminded me that back in those days there were no RTN (ready-to-nudge) buildings made. Everyone had to scratch-nudge and the quality of nudging wasn't so high as it is today. Buildings made from the Bilteezi sheets didn't work very well due to the cardboard and there were some unhappy crushed results when people, new to the technique, tried to nudge with too much enthusiasm.

 

Then Airfix brought out their plastic canopy kit and nudging for the average modeller took off and has never looked back.

 

Dsc04758.jpg.ce5ca269970da56c42a518885de1d97d.jpg

 

I also found this famous photo from the cover of an RM showing the Rev. Peter Denny nudging his entire Buckingham Mk.I. That was unheard of in those days, it was extremely advanced nudging and is part of the reason why Denny and Buckingham became so well known.

 

Dsc04759.jpg.9a4b66e545da4e0487a06559defb0b25.jpg

 

Of course now with Bachmann's Scalescenes and Hornby Skaledale resin buildings people can nudge cheaply in the comfort of their own homes even without expert nudging skills. The resin is very forgiving and the practice has become quite safe and much less destructive, unlike the chaotic early days.

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Yes but your in a whole new area of  nudging now this is nudging while wearing a tie:crazy_mini:

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On 11/07/2019 at 20:17, KNP said:

Then I thought….

 

what a bout a bit of 'free running' from the creamery roof.....

 

Ready, steady, go....

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_07/2139.jpg.985a837c8fc49aa257e2d4dca977dbb2.jpg

 

 

I've been meaning to ask this for some time, ever since I bought a pre-owned loco detailed with bunker coal. I thought the lumps looked totally out of scale on that and likewise here in closeup the lumps look to be sometimes 3 X head size on 4825. Is this realistic for coal loads of the time.?

 

Colin

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2 hours ago, BWsTrains said:

I've been meaning to ask this for some time, ever since I bought a pre-owned loco detailed with bunker coal. I thought the lumps looked totally out of scale on that and likewise here in closeup the lumps look to be sometimes 3 X head size on 4825. Is this realistic for coal loads of the time.?

 

Colin

 

Not unrealistic - many pics I've seen show coal in very big lumps in the tenders and bunkers. The hard working fireman was forced to smash them into bits so that they could be shovelled into the firebox and spread around to achieve the desired even burning. A fireman's job really was a filthy grimy back breaking one. 

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Thanks for some good tips in the new BRM, Kevin. Must get myself a seam roller .

 

I did find your instructions wanting as to the use of food cans, though. You do not say what brand or content. Looks like Heinz, but as a reader I really shouldn't be guessing.

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31 minutes ago, Mikkel said:

Thanks for some good tips in the new BRM, Kevin. Must get myself a seam roller .

 

I did find your instructions wanting as to the use of food cans, though. You do not say what brand or content. Looks like Heinz, but as a reader I really shouldn't be guessing.

Thanks

I have deliberately left the identity of the cans vague so the article had an international appeal whereby people reading this from all areas of the globe could use those readily available in their area...…!

Funnily, I did turn the cans around so the name was at the back so I couldn't be accused of subliminal advertising. 

 

There was an error and that description 1 was nothing to do with this model as my card does not come off a sprue nor do I have any instructions - it's all in my head.

 

Must find out what happened to the rest of the article as there was a whole section on the shop interior and the signs?

In fact I would say only half I what I wrote has appeared, the first time I see it is when it drops through the letterbox.

 

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Maybe the rest will turn up in a future issue. In some trades that's called the salami method. As a reader I was happy enough with what was there, and wouldn't mind a separate piece dedicated to shop windows etc.

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Visited one the cottages this afternoon and realised that the end one is owned by Jim Riddle, you know, the chap that is always standing at the end of Platform 2 with his hands in his pocket.

Apparently he is a railway buff and collects memorabilia which he keep's in his shed  at the bottom of the garden.

Well if I need any signs I know where to go now....!

 

gs4.jpg.50224c8cb0448ece05c6ff301e75fa98.jpg

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I bet he keeps Broad Guage memorabilia.

 

I remember that concrete coal bunker and filling our coal hod from the sliding door at the bottom .Another cameo gem!

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Heading off into the distance

 

2142.jpg.5aa85ce00baa0e80ff6a5b186be90c4e.jpg

 

2144.jpg.09bc9c8a729dafe5bde12c65f55b7c35.jpg

 

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Is that a pigeon loft next to the shed?

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3 minutes ago, wamwig said:

Is that a pigeon loft next to the shed?

 

It originally started it's life designed for pigeons but now been altered to just a humble shed.

I believe Jim gave them up a few years when his homing pigeons turned out to be anything but homing!

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7 minutes ago, KNP said:

 

It originally started it's life designed for pigeons but now been altered to just a humble shed.

I believe Jim gave them up a few years when his homing pigeons turned out to be anything but homing!

 

Sounds like my work colleague's birds! Is it scratch built as I need to model a couple sometime?

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4 minutes ago, wamwig said:

 

Sounds like my work colleague's birds! Is it scratch built as I need to model a couple sometime?

 

It is indeed from 2mm greyboard as the main structure and then clad with postcard strips etc.

Plastic corrugated roof.

Rear wall, tissue paper worked with Roket glue to give an uneven surface

 

It's sort of this size....

 

IMG_0451.jpg.533493f4975182bca731f41a477a608f.jpg

 

 

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To assist in estimating dimensions, is that a British Standard thumb in the picture? :jester:

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Thanks Kevin that's a great help and yes Chris I reckon that is a BS thumb!

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9 minutes ago, wamwig said:

Thanks Kevin that's a great help and yes Chris I reckon that is a BS thumb!

 

Well it wouldn't be a metric one in the 1930's would it!!!  :laugh_mini:

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14 minutes ago, Benbow said:

 

Well it wouldn't be a metric one in the 1930's would it!!!  https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_laugh_mini.gif

 

Oh, I don't know, when my granddad was in primary school in the 30s the 'cane' was a metre ruler.

 

I understand he was well acquainted with it.

 

And I can well believe it...

 

 

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