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KNP

Little Muddle

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2 hours ago, westerner said:

On working boats tyres were often used as fenders.


Agree but not sure if they would be used in the late 30’s was my only concern

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1 minute ago, KNP said:

 

B5061FC4-84A4-495B-A0EE-3707903F28AA.jpeg.fb45663d6149d1022f1d2eead03cf13a.jpeg

 

 

 

Splendid! Absolutely splendid.

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I believe her Port Of Registry was Ilfracombe, but the National Archive may be able to help with this; not on line, sadly, though!

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Looking at some old photos of fishing boats they appear to have used sausage shaped rope fenders.

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29 minutes ago, The Johnster said:

I believe her Port Of Registry was Ilfracombe, but the National Archive may be able to help with this; not on line, sadly, though!

Thanks.

Using Rule 1 I was planning to say she was registered in Newport...

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15 minutes ago, westerner said:

Looking at some old photos of fishing boats they appear to have used sausage shaped rope fenders.

Thanks.

Just need to work out how to model them as my rope weaving skills in this scale is a bit limited!!!!

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3D Printing? That moves the problem of rope weaving into the computer - but I'm not sure it would be any easier there!

Maybe someone has already done the hard work?

 

Edited by Harlequin
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23 minutes ago, colin penfold said:

 

I have a feeling I have seen these and they are quite large.

The tyres look good but again over large as the smallest one would be over 6 feet in dia.!! - Never seen tractors tyres used before!!!

 

Thanks for looking

Edited by KNP
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1 hour ago, KNP said:

Thanks.

Just need to work out how to model them as my rope weaving skills in this scale is a bit limited!!!!

Knitting...

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Always Hobbies smallest fender seems to be 12mm, 12 feet in 4mm scale, way too big.  Offer it as a challenge to your local sailing club!  Or, given the knitting suggestion, the jam & Jerusalem girls at the W.I....  

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Hi,

 

have you tried one of the special model boat suppliers?  Some-one like Cornwall Model Boats may be able to help with the fenders?  They are also a good source of different sorts of wood strip.

 

Roja

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Looks so at home Kevin, excellent.

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On 28/01/2020 at 06:20, The Johnster said:

Always Hobbies smallest fender seems to be 12mm, 12 feet in 4mm scale, way too big.  Offer it as a challenge to your local sailing club!  Or, given the knitting suggestion, the jam & Jerusalem girls at the W.I....  

Wouldn't that be 3 feet at 4mm scale and not 12 feet?

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The fender would be five feet by three, fairly large to be moved about for mooring. If it were for a permanent use, ie for a ferry docking , it would probably be ideal. Might be best to roll up a piece of plasticine that size and see what it looks like in situ?
Rich

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Morning Skipper....

Bit of a hurry I see from that wake and smoke?

 

SF7.jpg.603e80960b4eaf400b1ed706842b6b44.jpg

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4 hours ago, Ianlind said:

Wouldn't that be 3 feet at 4mm scale and not 12 feet?

Um, yes it would, making it more feasible for Kevin's Snowflake.

 

29 minutes ago, KNP said:

Snowflake charging up the channel at speed!

Trying to beat the tides to get in the estuary leading to Little Muddle harbour.....

It'll tight as slack water is nearly over!!!

 

SF6.jpg.bad514a9c872e29c265d64265f6495c9.jpg

 

Skipper at the wheel - decided to use the Dart Casting one as I had it...

Navigation lights needed, waiting for the missing one to arrive from Cornwall Model Boats.

Anchor to fit and the steam winch to built once I've worked out how to build it as I have no drawings, photos or idea at the moment....

I believe Puffers could manage 6 knots, which is hardly 'speed', but the bow wave and wake effects you have managed look about right for it, Kevin.  6 knots is not enough to 'hold ground' against a Bristol Channel tidal current, and she normally went with the tide and anchored when it was against her.  You would want to get to a harbour entrance during the slack water at the high tide's turning point so that you could negotiate the entrance without having to deal with a current, but a river or creek would need to be reached a little earlier while the tidal flow was still in the upstream direction.  

 

Leaving an up channel port such as yours is done shortly after the high point so that the ebbing tide can assist your passage to your down channel destination, Ilfracombe.  But when you get to 'Combe, the tide is out and the harbour dry, so you have to anchor to wait for the tide to rise again.  Leaving 'Combe. to come up channel, you want to be away as soon as the rising tide provides enough water to float you, and get as far up channel as you can before it turns and you have to anchor and wait 6 hours for the ebb to finish before continuing your passage, timing your anchor raising to enable a slack water entrance to whichever harbour or lock you were aiming for.  Get there too early and you have a very good chance of the tide carrying you past your entrance, in which case you've got to anchor again and wait for the ebb to position yourself for another go.  

 

Imagine driving a car with supermarket trolley wheels, steered from the rear and with no brakes, on a varying slope (representing wind) and a surface which is itself moving (tidal current), and further imagine that you have insufficient power to control it properly and you start to get the idea.  

 

Add a bit of weather to slow her down and/or poor visibility and you are beginning to see why she had a reputation for always being in trouble and wanting a tow.  She must have been an utter pig to steer in a following sea, most of the time running up channel, and not a lot of fun heading down channel on the ebb, with the current kicking up short, steep, waves against the prevailing wind, either.  The general opinion, probably with some justification, was that she requested tows in order to save money and make passages in the time expected by her customers as much as because of the need to be assisted out of trouble.  In rough weather if she hadn't found shelter she probably spent most of her time broached and being blown about sideways, not always in the general direction she wanted to go!

 

She's coming to life under your expert hand, Kevin!

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Sort of freelance modelling....

Had all these bits but no sketch, plan, instructions or photos of how it went together.

Got ideas from internet so here is the end result....


CE6C7493-E1B7-4C02-8C65-167F0E2B83BD.jpeg.437ecbce79e605f908ac2d4201afd3b4.jpeg

 

10CD5129-1559-4AD6-8109-759C445B63E4.jpeg.142a10a702e8f4babd124ed1b7ec76fd.jpeg

 

Only one pulley but I will need more!

The tops of some milk churns might work.

 

Edited by KNP
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Hi to Kevin, and the 250+ followers of this thread,

 

Having enjoyed reading this thread over the last year or so and thrown in the occasional thought, I decided I should let you know that I have set up a thread called "Lower Thames Yard" for my upcoming Western Region layout.

There is no layout yet, just plans, and while I can't promise this thread's level of modelling action (particularly on the boating front as there's no water in my model plans!) or of loco pictures, I hope you will have a look and chuck in your two pennys worth telling me (politely!) what you think of my efforts. 

Hopefully we can also have a joke or two along the way?

 

In the first post I have set the scene and subsequently asked help on background from the first respondents. 

 

Next I will be telling readers how I am dealing with semaphore and colour light signals to cope with operating in two eras 30 years apart!

Soon I hope to post pics of my efforts with BR and 1990s liveries although I know they are no match for the GW efforts of those posting to this site.

 

So "Cheers" everyone, and I hope to read from you in my thread at some stage!  

 

Best regards

Paul

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Just a thought. While the windlass will normally have cable wrapped around it, the capstan will have a polished metal appearance. No  matter how decrepit, any use will cause the hawser to polish the capstan face.

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