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Little Muddle


KNP
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1 hour ago, KNP said:

 

I have collating the pictures taken by a group of train spotters who where present when Bradley Manor steamed into view!

They where in various locations along the line, by the derelict barn, creamery water tower and branch track.

 

I've had a chat with them all and they have agreed to supply me on an occasional basis pictures of train movements on the main line.

 

 

I'd like to know how you managed to get them all in that room. Ah! Did you only allow them in one at a time? I hope that they didn't eat all of your biscuits.

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40 minutes ago, Mick Bonwick said:

 

I'd like to know how you managed to get them all in that room. Ah! Did you only allow them in one at a time? I hope that they didn't eat all of your biscuits.

 

Sometimes you get a glimpse of what really motivates people...

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One of photography's shibboleths is the rule of thirds. Subjects placed at one third of the way across the pic, from left or from right, look 'correct', it says. If the loco were to be placed thus, i.e. half way between the two pics, would the image be even better? Discuss!

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Posted (edited)
55 minutes ago, Oldddudders said:

One of photography's shibboleths is the rule of thirds. Subjects placed at one third of the way across the pic, from left or from right, look 'correct', it says. If the loco were to be placed thus, i.e. half way between the two pics, would the image be even better? Discuss!

The rule of thirds as I know it.

My camera display can divide the displayed picture into 9 segments, 3 x 3, if I place the main item of attention at any of these intersections then I’m playing the thirds/two thirds composition game and the picture appears more balanced.

Used it many times 

Edited by KNP
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Pic 1 for me.

 

I'm amazed that both photographers have managed to capture the motion in exactly the same position.

 

Same as they did with the Manor earlier.

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12 minutes ago, Stubby47 said:

Pic 1 for me.

 

I'm amazed that both photographers have managed to capture the motion in exactly the same position.

 

Same as they did with the Manor earlier.

 

The big hand from the sky had something to do with that as I couldn't be bothered to switch the power and controller on.

Perhaps, I need to be more careful in the future.......

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First one has a greater sense of space within the image and the second has depth created by the loco passing the tree.

 

Tricky!

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I vote for image #1: ignoring the rules of composition the boiler of the loco seems to be distorted -a little elongated- on #2, so #1 appears more believable!

 

 

 

 

 

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One point that has always struck me is when photographing anything moving, or in the case of a model vehicle, potentially moving, the subject should look like it has somewhere to go. So for the two photographs of the goods train, photo 1 looks like the train is moving into the space on the right hand side, whereas in the second picture it is going to run out of track. I'd be a little worried about your photographer friends, if they become very good you could be out of a job.

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20 minutes ago, cliff park said:

One point that has always struck me is when photographing anything moving, or in the case of a model vehicle, potentially moving, the subject should look like it has somewhere to go. So for the two photographs of the goods train, photo 1 looks like the train is moving into the space on the right hand side, whereas in the second picture it is going to run out of track. I'd be a little worried about your photographer friends, if they become very good you could be out of a job.

 

My favourite was the first one for that very reason, though not always there are times when a full picture works.

I expect I will end up still doing the pictures as 'my local friends' have disappeared at the moment probably because I've run out of biscuits!!!

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51 minutes ago, Mick Bonwick said:

The brick makes a big difference to the setting. Nice touch.

 

Absolutely - I think it's those little details (along with the overall standard of the modelling, obviously!) that really set LM apart.

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Extremely nice modelling again Kevin.

 

If you had placed the public house on a layout based down here in sunny Devon it would fit in perfectly I'd say.

 

May I ask how you did your thatch please ( sorry if I missed your technique in an earlier post maybe ).

 

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14 minutes ago, bgman said:

Extremely nice modelling again Kevin.

 

If you had placed the public house on a layout based down here in sunny Devon it would fit in perfectly I'd say.

 

May I ask how you did your thatch please ( sorry if I missed your technique in an earlier post maybe ).

 

Thanks.

I haven’t posted anything yet on the thatch but will one day when I collate it all.

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