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macgeordie

BR Diagram 1/148 HUO 24.5 ton Coal Hopper

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I started work on this project at the suggestion of Tim Shackleton who had told me that the diagram 1/148 HUO coal hopper has never been available ready to run which is surprising as there were so many of them built albeit to slightly different diagram numbers but apart from the early batches and the diagram 1/153 version the only significant differences were the types of buffers and axle boxes which were fitted.

 

These wagons were the forerunners of the 'Merry Go Round' coal hoppers.

 

The chart below shows the sequence of the builds of these wagons by the year of build. The different brake types started with a form of LNER clasp style shoes on each wheel and no ‘Tie bar’ between the axle guards with a centrally positioned V hanger for the lever. This was followed by the most common configuration which was a type with just one shoe per wheel with an offset V hanger and a tie bar between the axle guards. The final type, unique to diagram 153 had a disc type brake fitted to the Right hand wheel on each side of the wagon. This version was short lived and in most cases the brake was disconnected and the vehicle subsequently classed as unfitted, these wagons had been originally classed as ‘vacuum fitted’ whereas all the other ‘Lots’ were built as unfitted wagons. Axle boxes and buffers were often changed as the wagons aged, the list shows the types of equipment fitted ‘as built’ as much as I have been able to ascertain but I can’t guarantee this information is 100% correct. The diagram 153 and 155 wagons had 16” buffer heads, all the others had 13” buffer heads.

 

Year    Lot no.   B33xxxx no.   Qty built   Diagram   Brakes    Buffers    Axlebox   vac pipe

1954     2609     3002 - 3499       498          148       Clasp     Spindle       Oil            No

1958     3121     3500 - 3699       200          148       Single     Various     Roller         No

1959     3221     3700 - 4849      1150          148       Single  Self cont'd   Roller         No

1960     3315     5595 - 5694        100          153        disc        Oleo       Roller         Yes

1960     3314     4850 - 5594        745          148      Single      Spindle    Roller         No

1960     3374     5695 - 6234        540          148      Single   Self cont'd  Roller         No

1962     3425     6235 - 6384        150          153        disc        Oleo       Roller        Yes

1962     3426     6385 - 6932        548          154      Single   Self cont'd  Roller         No

1962     3437     6933 - 7175        243          148      Single     Various     Roller        No

1963     3466     7176 - 7753        576          155      Single   Self cont'd  Roller        No

1964     3526     8163 - 8262        100          155      Single    Hydraulic   Roller        No

1965     3525     7754 - 8162        409          155      Single    Hydraulic   Roller        No

 

Lot 3525 were built at Pressed Steel, all other production batches were built at Shildon

 

 

 

 

I've had a couple of test etches made and as usual the very first one ended up in the scrap metal box but the second one came out quite well.

 

post-6711-0-24041200-1489419450_thumb.jpg

 

I found the most difficult part was assembling and fitting the side stanchions. On the real wagon these are of pressed steel construction which isn't easy to replicate in an etch. I ended up making it from three layers which fold up to form the front face and another etch to form the foot which sits above the solebar. I have modified the etch significantly on the one I am building now but haven't quite got to that stage of the build yet.

I decided to have two etches made, one in brass and one in nickel silver and I'm currently building the nickel silver one. It is much nicer to work with than the brass version but unfortunately that puts the cost of the etch up by nearly 40% over the brass one.

 

post-6711-0-27598100-1489419716_thumb.jpg

 

Here are a few photos of the build so far.

This is the basic shell of the hopper.

post-6711-0-83013200-1489419775_thumb.jpg

 

This is the basic chassis with the ends added and a couple of small gussets which strengthen the end supports. Most of the wagons had spindle buffers when built but these were often changed to self contained types. I decided to fit the 51L models version to this wagon but found out afterwards the correct buffer should be the LMS models (Dave Franks) B018 self contained buffer so I shall have to order some of those for later.

 

post-6711-0-15469500-1489419868_thumb.jpg

 

This shows the actuator links for the hopper doors at the end of the wagon. The NEM pocket can be left off if it isn't needed and the linkage then becomes more visible. The chute covers will be the next thing to go on, they should (if I've got the dimensions correct) cover the open space which can be seen on the hopper where the chutes are situated.

 

post-6711-0-89189100-1489420076_thumb.jpg

 

So far everything has fitted together well, the challenge is the chute covers and side stanchions. I'll post a few more photos when I have got those parts assembled.

 

Ian

Edited by macgeordie
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Is this model in 4mm?

 

Whatever the scale it is mightily impressive. I started some plasticard based ones about 3 years ago which are on this thread: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/66197-br-245-ton-hopper-huo/

 

At the moment I haven't the time to trim all the supporting braces to width for mine and work out how to build the internal hopper chutes (other projects have far greater priority). Whilst an etched brass model will take me a while to build if these do become available then they will be a lot easier to finish than my scratchbuilt ones.

 

I noticed that you chose the earlier style (1/148) body. I don't know whether you have thought about the later 1/155 body where the vertical section was the same height on all four sides.

 

Regardless, I look forward to any developments regarding these wagons.

Edited by Flood

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Ks did a cast kit- unfortunately, it was based on the first wagon to be built, which was significantly different to all the others. The underframes of quite a number of these wagons were re-used to build 21t MDOs in the late 1970s/early 1980s.

This does look to be a very fine model.

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I noticed that you chose the earlier style (1/148) body. I don't know whether you have thought about the later 1/155 body where the vertical section was the same height on all four sides.

 

I am confused !!

 

The models in the photo have ".....the vertical section ... the same height on all four sides".

 

The first wagon to 1/148 - as modelled by Keysers - did not have ".....the vertical section ... the same height on all four sides", but I believe that all subsequent wagons, to all diagrams, did have ".....the vertical section ... the same height on all four sides".

 

That may not be reflected in the official BR diagrams - but that means nothing !!

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

Edited by cctransuk

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John

 

You've confused me. Ks represented the first 2 wagons with the vertical end shallower than the side. Then the common diag 148 with vertical end deeper than the sides. Followed by diag 158 which had the vertical of sides and ends all the same depths. The OP doesn't mention this fundamental difference.

 

Paul

 

http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/brhopperhuo

Edited by hmrspaul

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John

 

You've confused me. Ks represented the first 2 wagons with the vertical end shallower than the side. Then the common diag 148 with vertical end deeperr than the sides. Followed by diag 158 which had the vertical of sides and ends all the same depths. The OP doesn't mention this fundamental difference.

 

Paul

 

http://paulbartlett.zenfolio.com/brhopperhuo

 

Paul,

 

Quite right - that'll teach me to rely on (an increasingly flawed) memory !!

 

I can only plead that it must be at least thirty years since I converted a Keyser's kit into a 1/148 - and I don't think that I've had cause to check the history of the 24.5T hoppers since !

 

Regards,

John.

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And of course DJM has discussed producing these as RTR in 4mm and 2mm but no mention of which diagram

http://djmodels.co.uk/?p=470

No updates on this for a while though.

Beautiful modelling macgeordie, I'm pretty certain these beasts were used on South Wales-Avonmouth Coke flows as well as Coke hoppers in the 1970s, so very interested in the prototype and their modelling.

Neil

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Heavens mercy dancing hamsters.....

Yet more etched naughtiness Ian, I had forgotten that you might do these beasties.

A thing to remember for some is that Nickel Silver is a no no for some poor souls. The allergy is not nice, I was diagnosed the back end of last year. Nickel Silver is great to work with agreed mind, in spite of cost and allergies.

Methinks the savings jar needs digging out again......

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And of course DJM has discussed producing these as RTR in 4mm and 2mm but no mention of which diagram

http://djmodels.co.uk/?p=470

No updates on this for a while though.

Beautiful modelling macgeordie, I'm pretty certain these beasts were used on South Wales-Avonmouth Coke flows as well as Coke hoppers in the 1970s, so very interested in the prototype and their modelling.

Neil

 

 

Yes a pity that a company claimed them and then seems to have lost interest.

 

They replaced the COKES in South Wales as the latter rotted away. And some had extended lives at Onllwyn and Bolsover in their internal user fleets

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Hi Gents

 

Thanks for the positive comments. The sides of the wagon are a different height to the ends as per the BR diagram, it is a bit more obvious in this close up the corner.

 

post-6711-0-18494200-1489432597_thumb.jpg

 

Iain, if you want some of these I can get them done in brass for you instead of nickel silver. I never realised that anybody could have an allergy to it.

 

Ian

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Thanks Ian.

Let's see how things go.

We can discuss nearer your making them available.

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I got the hopper chute covers and the end stanchions fitted today, and fortunately everything fitted as it should.

 

This is the chute covers in  place.

 

post-6711-0-63279600-1489516337_thumb.jpg

 

and the end stanchions.

 

post-6711-0-55973100-1489516391_thumb.jpg

 

With a bit of luck I'll get a bit more done tomorrow.

 

Ian

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Some even made it down the Waterloo branch in Aberdeen.

 

https://flic.kr/p/5KkPMm

 

Lovely work, Ian.

Blimey, I knew they got around a bit but I didn't think they got as far as Aberdeen !!!

 

Ian

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Alas this is a XX rather than a 24.5!

 

Mark Saunders

What is an XX ?

 

Ian

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What is an XX ?

 

Ian

 

The use of Roman numerals for Hopper wagon capacity on the LNER hence XX for twenty ton hoppers (uprated to 21ton in 1939 and 21.5 tonne under metrication).

 

Mark

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I made a start on the two types of 'central position' side stanchions today and although they went together, I had to do a lot of filing and fiddling with them to get them to look right. I wouldn't be happy sending etches like that out to anybody so I'll modify the drawing and get another test etch done first. I still have the main side stanchions to assemble as well, I should be able to make a start on those tomorrow.

 

Here are a couple of photos of the two different types of side stanchion I have provided on the etch. There were one or two other variants, but not on the diagram 1/148 wagon which is the subject of this project.

There was a 'one off' with a weird square cut out type of side stanchion which I think was done to test unloading equipment at a power station for a 'Merry go Round' train, I seem to remember reading about it in David Monk Steels book about Merry Go Round trains.

 

post-6711-0-90623300-1489610620_thumb.jpg

 

post-6711-0-10987700-1489610638_thumb.jpg

 

The stanchions aren't soldered to the wagon yet, I just sat them in position for the photos.

 

Ian 

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You've really got my attention with this one, Ian! Significant wagon for Central Scotland, particularly the eastern side where they were used on the Kincardine traffic in particular.

 

 

Dave.

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There was a 'one off' with a weird square cut out type of side stanchion which I think was done to test unloading equipment at a power station for a 'Merry go Round' train, I seem to remember reading about it in David Monk Steels book about Merry Go Round trains.

 

This is the modified one, although the experiment has been removed. http://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/brhopperhuo/e10d0af83

 

Paul

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The use of Roman numerals for Hopper wagon capacity on the LNER hence XX for twenty ton hoppers (uprated to 21ton in 1939 and 21.5 tonne under metrication).

 

Mark

Thanks for the info Mark. I'm not really very well up on LNER stuff even though I am a Geordie. My main area of interest is LMS and BR stuff (principally wagons but you'd never guess from my project list !!!) up to about 1970.

 

Ian

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