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Given the track whirligig, it reminds me more of the Elephant & Castle, which has a rail overbridge, a Leslie Green tube station and had a plethora of tram routes.

post-14351-0-13927600-1498516359_thumb.jpg

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I chose conduit, partly because it is easier, but also it is what was actually in central London. Most of the tram layouts I see, are more traditional with catenary wires, and all the problems asociated.  am approaching it as a railway modeller, showing the less common scenes. I don't plan to add any trolley bus wires, initialy, but that might change.

HO does mean a little more can be squeezed in the space, and obviously it means the track gauge is correct. Narrowness of trams does make motorization more difficult, but I showed it could be done with compromises.

I am wondering what type of tram to do for other track. I have drawings for an E1 variant, but am tempted by a Feltham, although in the period I am modelling, these were being moved up to Leeds.

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Gee Dee Models in Nottingham are selling off a collection of H0 gauge tram models and kits - but they're continental. The AHM 2-car sets at $20, a nice single decker German car 30, Bachmann PCC cars and a BEC kit of same. No British trams. Also tram book collection. Some one reading here might be interested, visit Nottingham, make an offer and ride the finest tram system in the East Midlands!

 

Dava

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At the Blackpool exhibition, I had a chance to look at what was available. looking at Continental models , just shows how small the London trams were. The Bachmann Brill tram is again available, but it is too wide for an HO version of a London tram, but just about OK for OO. I bought one, but hopefully to motorize something else. In many ways the Bachmann Trackster units are the best. I could only get hold of the smaller ones, but have used the bus version in other trains, and they run very well.Just a pity other tram models use larger motors which are above the wheels. If Kato and others can produce an  low slung N gauge bogie tram chassis, then it should be possible in OO//HO.

Edited by rue_d_etropal
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Simon, two years on so how is this layout now looking, please?   Time for an update.   Colin.   

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i have some photos somewhere, thought I had published the online, but will post something here. Layout was finished and did local exhibition in January. I have photos I took at the exhibition.

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photos as promised, taken at small exhibition in Blackburn in January. It all fitted into case under the table!

hoburn-road-pic-01-sm.jpghoburn-road-pic-02-sm.jpghoburn-road-pic-03-sm.jpghoburn-road-pic-04-sm.jpghoburn-road-pic-05-sm.jpghoburn-road-pic-06-sm.jpghoburn-road-pic-07-sm.jpg

 

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the points are meant as non working in this layout, but point blades can be fitted if working points wanted.

There is room to fit point blade(s).

I think Colin could explain how he has done his  better.

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Tim, after the demise of "West Croydon", I planned to have a replacement London layout.   It took sometime to decide on the type of line and I went from a Deptford Wharf style to a circular double track, half fiddle yard, half developed High Road style.   The point work of a crossover was commenced with short sections of rail as the blades. A pivot wire was solded to the non-blade end and a fine rod soldered to both blades to be kept in a biased position by a spring.   However, other events came up pushing the London layout back to square one.  With the development of 14mm. gauge for 3'6" operation, I have for a Black Country layout, gone for biased point work whereby all points are passed in the trailing position through the curved part but entered only on the straight part.   This means all rail is fixed with just a flange gap at the fixed blade end.   The line using Simon's paved and open track sections throughout, has a single siding for a small stabling or parcels depot.   I did not take any photos of the 16.5mm. gauge crossover as I never finished it.   I will be recording the 14mm. gauge track work on the thread on 14mm. gauge track.   Whenever I return to the London layout, it will be a double track conduit circular but the crossover will be cosmetic purely for having simple electric circuits and no overhead for running LT trams round and round!   My fleet has not had a run for years now with further cars awaiting completion.   

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I'm more interested in decnt looking working single point turnouts and junctions. A friend showed me a post on Tramfare that looks like someone is working on those. Hopefully in my lifetime . . .

 

Tim

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Tim, I can assure you that if you go back through "Tramfare" issues and books on tramway modelling you will find what you want for scratch-building all aspects of track work.   The continual problem has been to find a sustainable way and acceptable standards to ultimately produce RTR track work.   Hamo (later Conrad) and Rivarossi were first on the scene when I was living in Germany in 1958/9.   Currently "Proto87" has produced such products.   But we continually come back to wheel/track standards acceptable both to manufacturers and modellers.   In 4mm. scale of course we have further complications on true gauge - 16.5mm. continues to be the tramway compromise  for broad through standard to narrow gauge.   Chris Ward introduced his 3D print paved pieces closely followed by Simon with his much improved concept.   But to get the 'decent looking' paved tram track you either have to be good model engineer or be financially fortunate to afford the use of one.   Whilst the T&LRS has done all possible since 1965 to get methods to produce decent 4mm, scale paved track, the society has always supported any attempt to make the introduction to tramway modelling easier, by RTR and/or kits, as part of its policy to attract the younger generation.  Certainly Simon's work has gone a long way to assist with 16.5mm. gauge and now helping with 14mm. gauge which assists both 4mm. and 7mm. scales.

 

Yes, Tim you highlight a continuing 'fault' leaving the individual to go their own way.   If you go back in world tramway history you will find even the prototype had the same problems!!!

Finally, if you have not done so, have a look at John Howe's layouts in his Kingsway Models site - there is another compromise.   Please let us all know how you get on. I am always learning but do not necessarily have the skills to do it!   Colin.

 

 

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