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That's very interesting as well but it's not the same model - that is a model of what was built. It looks like quite a good representation of the 1896 batch of trains with 40ft motor cars.

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A well known Colour Rail view of an excursion train with observation coach that has left the MDHB Riverside Station and is crossing the dock swing bridge on its way to Waterloo Goods and Edge Hill (BR).  The unique signal controlled both rail and shipping.   Out of view to the right would be a man walking with a red flag (a bit hard to model!)

mdhb colour rail superD obs coach.jpg

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A Continental example but a great piece of realistic, industrial modelling, especially the corrugated iron and the little details.

 

door.jpg

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Posted (edited)

DSC_3280

 

Although this design is probably heavy, I like the idea of using the fold down flaps for storage, keeping sticky fingers away, and displaying information.

Edited by Stephenwolsten
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I well remember as a nipper sitting at the front alongside the driving compartment when my Dad took me on the LOR several times as a treat. Have you seen the preserved coach in the Liverpool museum near the Albert dock Stephen?

 

Dave

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I'm still attracted to the idea of extruded foam baseboards, with a thin ply frame.   This display diorama is built on a base of 30mm thick extruded polystyrene flooring foam with a secondary lower frame, cut from the same 30mm thick foam.  This particular baseboard has an outer framework mitred up from 9mm thick MDF, and four diagonal cross braces also from 9mm MDF help to reduce torsional deflection. With acknowledgements to New Prospect Lane.

baseboard diorama.jpeg

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To me, that still looks very heavy construction.

 

On my Grindleford layout I used 50mm insulation foam - known as Celotex, Kingspan and other brand names - with 6mm ply sides and 19mm ply ends glued to it:

 

grindleford-baseboards001.jpg.a38b6853a8b4001ab4cb1a0bbb2d2bf1.jpg

 

grindleford-baseboards002.jpg.0eab1cda350f818bcf76dc158c858134.jpg

 

grindleford-baseboards003.jpg.bd9c9f85c0abd58c68b6535e62a5420b.jpg

 

I found that the 50mm foam has sufficient torsional rigidity on its own to not require further bracing.

 

The end result is much, much lighter than a conventional ply-built board, but is just as easy to model on.

 

I used a layer of 6mm ply glued on top to define the trackbed.

 

grindleford-baseboards004.jpg.9417d66af292985cb34dbfcecc9d0575.jpg

 

Hope this helps,

 

Al.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Alister_G said:

To me, that still looks very heavy construction.

 

On my Grindleford layout I used 50mm insulation foam - known as Celotex, Kingspan and other brand names - with 6mm ply sides and 19mm ply ends glued to it:

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/grindleford-baseboards001.jpg.a38b6853a8b4001ab4cb1a0bbb2d2bf1.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/grindleford-baseboards002.jpg.0eab1cda350f818bcf76dc158c858134.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/grindleford-baseboards003.jpg.bd9c9f85c0abd58c68b6535e62a5420b.jpg

 

I found that the 50mm foam has sufficient torsional rigidity on its own to not require further bracing.

 

The end result is much, much lighter than a conventional ply-built board, but is just as easy to model on.

 

I used a layer of 6mm ply glued on top to define the trackbed.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/grindleford-baseboards004.jpg.9417d66af292985cb34dbfcecc9d0575.jpg

 

Hope this helps,

 

Al.

 

 

 

Thanks very much.  It's really useful to see what other people use and how particular methods perform.

 

Stephen

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On 10/09/2019 at 16:58, Alister_G said:

To me, that still looks very heavy construction.

 

On my Grindleford layout I used 50mm insulation foam - known as Celotex, Kingspan and other brand names - with 6mm ply sides and 19mm ply ends glued to it:

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/grindleford-baseboards001.jpg.a38b6853a8b4001ab4cb1a0bbb2d2bf1.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/grindleford-baseboards002.jpg.0eab1cda350f818bcf76dc158c858134.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/grindleford-baseboards003.jpg.bd9c9f85c0abd58c68b6535e62a5420b.jpg

 

I found that the 50mm foam has sufficient torsional rigidity on its own to not require further bracing.

 

The end result is much, much lighter than a conventional ply-built board, but is just as easy to model on.

 

I used a layer of 6mm ply glued on top to define the trackbed.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/grindleford-baseboards004.jpg.9417d66af292985cb34dbfcecc9d0575.jpg

 

Hope this helps,

 

Al.

 

 

 

How deep were the sides and ends Al and what did you use to glue the Celotex? 

Steve.

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3 hours ago, sb67 said:

 

How deep were the sides and ends Al and what did you use to glue the Celotex? 

Steve.

 

Hi Steve, the sides and ends were made 100mm deep - i.e. twice the depth of the foam. I used a solvent-free building adhesive (I think it was from Screwfix) to glue them to the foam.

 

Al.

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I rather fancy this 1:43 3D model of a 1954 Bristol lorry, which comes as a simple kit but which needs extras like axles, wheels and glazing.

Bristol lorry.jpg

 

brs.jpg

brs 1957.jpg

Edited by Stephenwolsten
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A slightly different view of the scene that has inspired my layout interest, featuring the Lancastrian rail tour.  The dock police were in a good mood and let some photographers into the dock estate to photograph the special excursion train.  Photograph courtesy of Dave Rogers?.

rogers.jpg

Edited by Stephenwolsten
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The sun always shines in Liverpool.  Isn't the internet wonderful!   A photographer took this picture out of interest and years later I find it useful for modelling the distinctive MDHB lamp posts.  (Please see 16 June 2019 post too).   This view confirms the shape of the lanterns.   Now I need a  'cottage industry' manufacturer of small architectural parts to supply some complete lights with columns .............

 

#120 365 30 April 2013

 

Edited by Stephenwolsten
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I wonder what is the best way to model a few feet of a brick wall that accurately represents this view of the 13 ft high dock wall in Liverpool? 

030 Clarence Dock (Wall)

 

Edited by Stephenwolsten
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In 2001 Iain Rice asked, in his book Designs for Urban Layouts, 'why has the urban railway received such short shrift from modellers'?  Things have improved a lot since then, but there is still some truth in the question.   The idealised countryside where it never rains is still a common sight at exhibitions!  American and Continental modellers seem to have modelled urban scenes more than UK ones, but in some cases - for example Germany and Switzerland -  the results are a bit 'twee'.

 

The concept of Atlantic Dock was inspired by an actual location - East Princes Half Tide Dock in Liverpool - but it shares many of Iain Rice's thoughts.   For example, he noted that seaport cities offer rich pickings for railway modellers, with dock lines of inset track diving off into a complex riverside jungle of quays, transit sheds, warehouses and goods yards.  He identified paved track in granite sets as the signature of the urban/dock railway if ever there was one.  And he emphasised the vertical scope of urban railways.  Multi-level urban railways offer great variety where different railways meet or cross.   In the case of Atlantic Dock, the intensive rapid transit of the Liverpool Overhead Railway contrasts with the shunting of dockside goods traffic below, movements to and from the inland BR depots, and the occasional passenger train on the Riverside Branch.   

 

The Overhead is unique and instantly recognisable as Liverpool.   But Atlantic Dock will also have other "signature items" that will convey the location and period.  The elements that define the essential character of the dockside railway on the Mersey include the cobbles, the lamp posts, the high dock wall and gates, the signage on the transit sheds, massive warehouses, crossings, and of course the L&Y Pugs.

 

I also think that an eye-level viewpoint with a diorama approach involving a fairly fixed viewpoint will be very suitable for Atlantic Dock.   I want people to view the scene across the layout from the quayside, rather than from above as a seagull.  And practical considerations of space will make it essential to use buildings or part of buildings, such as transit sheds, to constrain viewing.

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This is a useful little edited clip of sound effects at Liverpool docks.   It's a pity it is so short but I can trace the longer source film easily.  

 

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