Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Has anyone tried Redutex 3D self-adhesive texture sheeting please?  I have seen the earlier thread some years ago, plus this useful image of the material used on the Kingfisher Wharf layout.  This product could save days of work clay modelling.   https://www.dccsupplies.com/item-p-106939/stone-setts-square-dark-grey-redutex-043ad112.htm

Kingfisher05.JPG.ea519d08b8a33c86bf4c1887fb456e90.jpeg

Edited by Stephenwolsten
Updated.
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used the 4mm version. 

 

This is how it looks when laid;

 

 

 

I ordered directly from Redutex in spain when UK stocks were low. It needs to be cut with something very sharp and the surface on which it is laid needs to be decent, any wee blemishes show through. The nearest thing I can liken it to is laying 1 mm thick lino. 

 

I also gave the surface to which I was sticking it (thin card in the case of that bridge) a wash over with dilute pva to prepare it. 

  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 16/09/2019 at 16:08, Stephenwolsten said:

I wonder what is the best way to model a few feet of a brick wall that accurately represents this view of the 13 ft high dock wall in Liverpool? 

030 Clarence Dock (Wall)

 

I would use MS Paint, a standard, easy to use facility on your PC.  You could reproduce this photo above and be sticking it or chosen portions of it onto a plasticard backing in a couple of minutes.

 

Move the captured image (via CTRL+PRINT SCREEN) through the MS Paint programme into a blank WORD document, Print as large or small as you need (If you go to VIEW on the top of WORD toolbar and select GRIDLINES, these will show on the image but not appear on it when you print. This will allow you to size it for scale by dragging the corner of the image on the WORD doc. I find one grid square equal to about 9 scale inches in 4mm scale, so you can play around and adjust for any scale).

 

I then print whatever is required, and cut it out, using printer paper, not photo paper, to keep it matt. I then brush liquid poly onto the back of the printed image and it can dry if it chooses to. Then lay it on plasticard and re-soak the image with liquidpoly. This goes through the paper and sticks it onto plasticard. If not fully fixed, give it a minute and the add more liquidpoly. BE WARY - ENSURE GOOD VENTILATION.

 

You will now have the brickwork you had in the photo fixed to plasticard which you can trim as necessary. Align another print-out of the wall and by joining print-outs you can make it as long or as high as you need. I copy photos of signs, make my own signs in Powerpoint and copy those across, and lift bits of useful photos I find or took myself. Once you get used to MS Paint and the transfer to WORD, it is very quick and easy.

 

You would get about 18 scale feet width of brickwork from the above photo.

 

aac

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A later view, after demolition of Princes Dock LOR station.  The station was badly damaged in the 1941 blitz and never reopened.  This means I will not have to model the station and my Judith Edge kits will suffice.

Mersey Docks & Harbour Board Engine No 14 At Princes Dock Liverpool 1955

 

Edited by Stephenwolsten
Added information
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

This extract from a signalling diagram for the MDHB Riverside Branch shows the dock road (top), the dock lines, the route of the Overhead Railway (above them), a transit shed (left)  and the Princes Dock engine shed that I hope to model.   I may also include the separate MDHB workshop which was further to the right (south) - see next picture for this segment.

layout plan.jpg

Edited by Stephenwolsten
Added information
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is an example of a railway photograph without a train that yields so much modelling information - gate mechanisms, torn posters, the police hut with a bobby on duty plus telephone bells and a little porch roof, the way the pavement dips down at the gates to avoid a curb, the unusual signal with wiring kept above traffic level etc.  Photograph by the late Alec Swain and one of a series he took on a walk along the length of the Liverpool dock road.

mdhb_wall_detail_Swain_1.jpeg

Edited by Stephenwolsten
  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...