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8 hours ago, Stephenwolsten said:

Photo courtesy of Tony Robertson's Flickr site, photographed at a Southport Model Railway Show.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_05/br.jpg.91f620055b2f3aa8f1dc9253f1e179f8.jpg

That must have been Herculaneum Dock's first visit to Southport in 2002, long before the LOR was added to it. I had to squash Brunswick shed a bit to squeeze it into the corner of the layout and it now gives us something of an operating problem as we can't see which locos are in there.

We do also have a 7mm kit for this loco.295129120_06-09blpaintedsmall.jpg.74717019a0868c49d6843cd94d3fa141.jpg

photo by Ian Rathbone who painted this one.

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4 hours ago, Michael Edge said:

That must have been Herculaneum Dock's first visit to Southport in 2002, long before the LOR was added to it. I had to squash Brunswick shed a bit to squeeze it into the corner of the layout and it now gives us something of an operating problem as we can't see which locos are in there.

We do also have a 7mm kit for this loco.https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_05/295129120_06-09blpaintedsmall.jpg.74717019a0868c49d6843cd94d3fa141.jpg

photo by Ian Rathbone who painted this one.

Thanks for the extra information and the great photograph.  I'm going to need something like this, but a bit dirtier!

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Interesting drawing from New York, very similar construction but no decking. I don't know of any other elevated railway which was waterproof - and that's what killed the LOR, not the steam locos underneath. There are similar stretches of the Paris Metro and of course the EL in Chicago, all are open to the sky and let the rain fall through. The rain falling on the LOR was supposed to drain out through tiny holes at each side of the troughs in the deck plates (which were of course horizontal), these must have blocked up pretty quickly judging by the state of the top of the railway. Why on earth the dockers were entitled to an "umbrella" when they didn't have any protection before is beyond me.

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The dock railway is built with bullhead rail soldered to copperclad sleepers, the checkrail is slightly smaller flat bottom rail soldered on its side in the web of the bullhead. The flange forms the checkrail and is about right for 00/16.5mm. Round switch blades a vertical strip of n/s is soldered to keep the fill away from the rails, this part is concrete, done with ordinary filler, most of the rest is granite setts which are impressed into grey tile grout. There is a short section of track at the Herculaneum Dock end (not connected to the rest of the railway) which was built from drawn tram rail. This was produced experimentally by the wire mill where most rail was made but I don't think it went into production. It was very difficult to curve - which is why it was used for this short straight section.972621517_DSCF2710cropped.jpg.d5a255856bf329064d90548d5fd84fdd.jpg

This is the track leading in to the MDHB shed, all still "concrete". Southport 2014, when the LOR had been added but not weathered. A notable feature of the MDHB system was that very few sidings turned out of the adjacent track, most came from the opposite track via a diamond crossing like the shed entrance here. This does cause a few operating headaches on the layout.

804385968_DSCF1207acropped.jpg.aa14dd91c9d6202ea7b9c2d818c89024.jpg

Ganite setts around a crossover under Herculaneum Dock station.

 

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7 hours ago, Furness Wagon said:

where did you get the tramway rail?

 

Marc

 

Sorry, any model track pictures posted by me are Pinterest ones which I have pinned as 'inspiration' or examples of technique.

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3 hours ago, Michael Edge said:

The dock railway is built with bullhead rail soldered to copperclad sleepers, the checkrail is slightly smaller flat bottom rail soldered on its side in the web of the bullhead. The flange forms the checkrail and is about right for 00/16.5mm. Round switch blades a vertical strip of n/s is soldered to keep the fill away from the rails, this part is concrete, done with ordinary filler, most of the rest is granite setts which are impressed into grey tile grout. There is a short section of track at the Herculaneum Dock end (not connected to the rest of the railway) which was built from drawn tram rail. This was produced experimentally by the wire mill where most rail was made but I don't think it went into production. It was very difficult to curve - which is why it was used for this short straight section.https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_05/972621517_DSCF2710cropped.jpg.d5a255856bf329064d90548d5fd84fdd.jpg

This is the track leading in to the MDHB shed, all still "concrete". Southport 2014, when the LOR had been added but not weathered. A notable feature of the MDHB system was that very few sidings turned out of the adjacent track, most came from the opposite track via a diamond crossing like the shed entrance here. This does cause a few operating headaches on the layout.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_05/804385968_DSCF1207acropped.jpg.aa14dd91c9d6202ea7b9c2d818c89024.jpg

Ganite setts around a crossover under Herculaneum Dock station.

 

Thanks for posting these high quality images of Herculaneum Dock.

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Dockside detail including entrance to dry dock, quay walls, lamp post, and mooring bollards.

Victoria-Clock.jpg

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